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Old 04-09-2016, 05:23 PM   #1
2 Rivet Member
1968 22' Safari
Tulsa , Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 80
Gaskets for fixed panes on late 60s models

In gutting, our 68 Safari, I知 looking closely at the windows. Sooner or later, we値l be reconditioning them. As I知 sure everyone knows, the upper (curved) panes crank outward and, for those, we have all the material and knowledge we need. I think. We値l see.

As most of you also know, the windows have lower panes that are fixed. They don稚 crank out. Their top edges are held in place with a removable shelf and my plan was to remove those, slide the panes out, clean them up, install new rubber seal (the grey stuff which we got from VTS) on all four sides, slide the glass back into place and then reinstall the top shelf. Presto, just like new, right?

Maybe not so much. I may have hit a snag. I removed one shelf, exposing the top edge of a lower pane on the curb side. I brought the shelf inside and have been trying different methods of cleaning it up. Then, for grins, I tried to remove the old rubber seal from it. After struggling for some time, something occurred to me and I said to myself: 鉄elf, I don稚 think this seal was originally installed with the idea that it would ever have to be removed. This seal is firmly glued into place.

Is that true or is there a secret way of removing the original grey rubber seal from around the fixed panes in a late 6os unit? Heat? Glue-devouring microbes? Fervent prayer?

Speak to me wise ones.

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Old 04-09-2016, 06:47 PM   #2
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1967 30' Sovereign
Los Lunas , New Mexico
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Posts: 6,333
Responding just to watch. Our 67 seems to have different seals, but i could be flat wrong, too.

WBCCI 21043
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Old 04-10-2016, 06:39 AM   #3
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1964 22' Safari
1968 26' Overlander
Beaver County , Pennsylvania
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 394
I'd love to see some photos. My first thought was, can you use a razor scraper? It would cut through the rubber and glue but not the glass.
We're working on a 68 Overlander and, it looks to me like our only leaks are from the fixed windows above the front crank-out windows. My plan was to scrape and seal them inside and out without removing them. Maybe some creeping crack cure sealant as well?

Roy and Marie
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Old 04-10-2016, 08:18 PM   #4
2 Rivet Member
1968 22' Safari
Tulsa , Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 80
Here are a couple pics. In the first, you can see the grey rubber seal in place. In the other (a different window) you can see the "groove" that it fits into and then the glass into that. I've taken the top piece of aluminum out and the rubber seal seems solidly glued into it.
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Old 04-10-2016, 08:53 PM   #5
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1968 24' Tradewind
Oxford, , Mississippi
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 1,307
You don't have remove the frame. The flat panes on a 68 are held in with the rubber gasket. Someone may have added seaant but factory panes are just held in with the gasket (which will be hard as a rock) and you do not have to take out the frame. That said, if it is glued in then the easiest way would be to just break out the old pane, clean out the frame and replace the pane and the seal. I found the correct gasket at a local ACE hardware store that replaces window panes for customers. It was very cheap. I replaced the lower flat panel on three of the windows in my 68 TW. I will say that the 3rd one went a lot faster than the first two. Getting the gasket back in is tricky until you get the hang of it.
Finally, be very careful on the curved windows. Do not pry on the glass bar parts to try and separate them to get the old glass out as they will bend very easily. Use a heat gun to soften the old sealant and gently work the two pieces apart to release the glass. PM me when you get ready to do the job, I did 4 and there are other tips I will be glad to share.
Bruce & Rachel
68 Trade Wind
2001 Toyota Tundra
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Old 04-12-2016, 06:51 AM   #6
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1968 22' Safari
Tulsa , Oklahoma
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Posts: 80
So when measuring the new glass, it should not be so wide/tall as to reach into the metal slots that form the frame, but just to the rim of the slots? Because the glass is held in place by the rubber, not the slots? Only the rubber goes into the slots?
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:51 AM   #7
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1967 28' Ambassador
1964 19' Globetrotter
1960 24' Tradewind
Edgewood , Kentucky
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 206
The rubberized seal being referred to is actually a plastic seal. Or also known as a glazing strip. They snap into place making it hard to remove them in one piece and not break the window. I peel the edge of the seal away from the window with a utility knife and then used a pair of small needle nose pliers to pull it out of its groove. I don't think I've ever managed to remove any in one piece. I suggest grabbing some RTV gasket sealant. That is the same stuff used for automobile wind screens. Clean the residue off of the metal frame. Apply RTV around the metal frame before setting the window. Then snap the plastic glazing strip in place. Practice cutting a cope cut with two pieces so your corners are tight and not left short. This project is harder to most than it would seem.... Good luck!
Artisan Airstreams
Custom restorations and renovations
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Old 04-13-2016, 06:44 AM   #8
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1968 22' Safari
Tulsa , Oklahoma
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Posts: 80
Got it. Thanks. We'll give it a go and let you know.

Jay & Lisa

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