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Old 10-05-2009, 05:58 PM   #15
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Thanks for the link 2air. That explains alot! I would expect that exposed OSB, when driving on rain puddled roads, would be dripping wet and swell up easily, wouldn't it?

Robbie,
If mine wasn't leaking (you should be able to see water spots in the wood floor against the wall if it was), I wouldn't open it up to seal it but I would keep a close eye on it. Agreeing again with 2air, sealing the bottom of the trimline bracket is something I would avoid since it would trap water and allow it to seep into the aluminum seam that is behind it. When I sealed mine, I only sealed the seam of the wall to the trunk platform. Then when I put the trimline bracket back on, it is unsealed top and bottom.
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Old 10-05-2009, 09:00 PM   #16
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What's Under a 22' AS

To set the story straight - The OSB, as unsatisfactory as it may be, is thankfully not completely exposed under the 22' trailer. The factory covered the OSB with some form of black vinyl coating that is wrapped up over the edges into the C-channel. This is supposed to provide a water-proof protective coating underneath. As you can see the picture in the post below, most of the floor underneath is actually concealed (and possibly protected) by the 3 tanks that are wrapped in their aluminum boxes.

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f476...tml#post743934

I have mixed feelings about not having a belly pan. A belly pan is not completely sealed and water can intrude from ride in rain storms, as people have reported. Without the belly pan I can inspect (and possibly paint) my frame, the visible flooring, plumbing, etc. I do lose the insulation value of the belly pan, but do I need it in Texas? I had one estimate of over $2000 to install a belly pan -- too much for me. I just don't know how much more protection a belly pan would give me. I'm still researching. Comments always appreciated.
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Old 10-05-2009, 11:08 PM   #17
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Ahh, the OSB on yours looks covered better than the one in the link 2air had. Maybe they had removed the black covering in the picts during the repair. On occassion, sicne we got our AS in March, have wished I could see the frame without pulling the bellypan and banana wraps off so I guess both have their benefits and disadvantages... and for $2000, I would buy a new fridge and stove before a belly wrap :P

Have you had a rain since the sealing?

Tadd
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Old 10-06-2009, 12:55 AM   #18
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Yes...lots of rain (plus I first put my hose on it). All has stayed dry inside. "Wish I knew then, what I know now"
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Old 10-06-2009, 06:50 AM   #19
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I don't like that black covering on the bottom of the floor AT ALL. Now WHEN water gets to the OSB, as it inevitably will, the black layer will not let it drip away as would happen with a belly pan several inches below. It will hold the water right at the OSB where it will have a hard time evaporating. This will accelerate the rot.

All Airstreams eventually leak. It may be from the rear bumper area or from a leak higher up travelling down between the walls. The more you travel with your airstream and the more it bumps down the road (vs. being permanently parked in a camp ground or other location), the more chances you will have for a leak to develop as caulk joints crack from vibration and body flex. The key is to actively watch for them and address them as soon as detected.

Also, if you caulk the rear bumper to rub strip gap, you definitely need to caulk the full length of the upper rub strip to body seam to keep water from getting in there and now being trapped behind the rub strip against the wood. And I say caulk the entire length of the upper seam, not just above the bumper, because the water can travel horizontally behind the rub strip.

One last thought, watch that rear bumper gap after the first time you pull the trailer after you caulk the gap (and every time thereafter). If the floor has already rotted, you may already have separation between the frame and body because the bolts pulled thru the soft wood. This may rip your nice caulking job apart the next time you pull it. I know, because that is exactly what happened to us on a previous trailer. There was no way to seal the gap until the body was reattached securely to the frame to keep the gap from moving.

Good Luck!
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Old 10-31-2009, 08:34 PM   #20
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Yes! It can really Leak In and here's one way.

I discovered yesterday how it is possible to break a seal and let the water in. I hit a pothole, really hard, in a tremendous rainstorm and that's when the leaks really started.

When I first discovered this problem, I was mystified as to how the water got in. Then after caulking the area and sitting through some pretty strong storms, it remained dry and I thought I had the problem fixed. But also, I wondered if this was because it just the way the trailer was made, or something the owner does to cause the problem. Now I guess I know the answer.

My lesson learned is to watch out for what rough rides or big bumps can do to cause seals to break or come loose.

I'll find out more from Jackson Center in a few days.

The story is here: http://www.airforums.com/forums/f42/...-oh-58049.html

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Old 11-02-2009, 12:02 PM   #21
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Just in the time...

This thread came just in time. I am gutting the entire interior of my newly purchased 77' Sovereign (rear twin bed). I check the floor pretty good before buying and found the subfloor to be plywood and to be in pretty good shape. The only rot is in the last 8" of the rear of the trailer. Knowing we had a rain storm coming I caulked up that rear outside of the trailer(lights, windows, ...) and was dismayed to find the area wet again yesterday. I hadn’t even thought of the water seeping in from the bumper. I will caulk that area good before the next rain.

Question # 1...if the subfloor in that rear is exposed to the bumper, when I replace the rear 8" of subfloor can I somehow slide the new piece in from the outside of the trailer under the base-rail?

Question # 2...I assume the horizontal trims that run around the back side of the trailer should NOT be caulked. Correct? The water should be allowed to flow under those? I assume at least one of those is hiding a seam between the upper and lower exterior skins AND the upper skin is lapped over the lower. Correct?

Thanks all...
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Old 11-02-2009, 02:06 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by MDSilverado View Post
[COLOR=black][FONT=Verdana]This thread came just in time. I am gutting the entire interior of my newly purchased 77' Sovereign (rear twin bed)....
hi md'

there are MANY threads on partial subfloor or COMPLETE subfloor replacement...

many of those threads have great photos and how2tricks...

basically the replaced section go in from the INSIDE, typically fit into a channel

and in SOME cases the SHELL is take OFF to do floors.

once you've removed some of the rotted ply, FRAME RUST can be evaluated.

typically there are MULTIPLE issues to address

and like an iceberg, MOST of the hazards are BELOW the surface...
_______________

FINDING the water entry point is not always simple.

yes the outer doors or trim can leak, but so can the frame/shell connection or the ROOF or WINDOWS...

and the water migrates to the back end.
_______________

so spend a LOT of time reading the resto' threads focus on 70s units and the floor/rot threads for that era...

here is a recent/partial floor replacement with some really good photos...

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f36/...oor-54952.html

but there are 100s of similar stories in the big silver city...

cheers
2air'
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Old 11-02-2009, 07:20 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDSilverado View Post
This thread came just in time. I am gutting the entire interior of my newly purchased 77' Sovereign (rear twin bed). I check the floor pretty good before buying and found the subfloor to be plywood and to be in pretty good shape. The only rot is in the last 8" of the rear of the trailer. Knowing we had a rain storm coming I caulked up that rear outside of the trailer(lights, windows, ...) and was dismayed to find the area wet again yesterday. I hadn’t even thought of the water seeping in from the bumper. I will caulk that area good before the next rain.

Question # 1...if the subfloor in that rear is exposed to the bumper, when I replace the rear 8" of subfloor can I somehow slide the new piece in from the outside of the trailer under the base-rail?

Question # 2...I assume the horizontal trims that run around the back side of the trailer should NOT be caulked. Correct? The water should be allowed to flow under those? I assume at least one of those is hiding a seam between the upper and lower exterior skins AND the upper skin is lapped over the lower. Correct?

Thanks all...
MD, The trim around the mid section of the trailer is really just cosmetic. I took mine off to make sure and found a couple of empty rivet holes from the factory. I used parbond to seal the top of that trim just to keep dirt from getting behind there. The bottom trim, rubrail, hides the seam between the shell and the banana wrap on the bottom. The upper skin is actually lapped under the banana wrap. Not good. So I removed all the trim and used a bead of vulkem where the two lapped. Then I replaced the trim and used parbond on the top of the trim to keep dirt from getting in there. Only the older, (60's and before), trailers lapped the shell over the banana wrap I believe. George.
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Old 11-02-2009, 07:30 PM   #24
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I just replaced the trunk door seal on our 2004 28' International today and have been chasing a leak that is keeping the floor wet in this area. I have been resealing seams above this area thinking that was where the water was coming from. I did not even think about water coming in at the the horizontal seam at the bumper. Guess I will be resealing that area next. Does anyone have any suggestions on drying out the subfloor under the vinyl flooring?
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Old 11-02-2009, 07:55 PM   #25
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This is a shame.

In the above post I also spoke to soon. I found a small leak and mine is exactly where everyone elses is........bumper.

MrRivet, will your vinyl flooring come up easily ?

If not, you might want to consider taking it up any way and use a fan for a few days.

If you don''t it may not ever dry well.

I have plywood and mine does not seem too bad but was wet a few inches inside the storage area.

All because water is running in at the bumper.

I removed all carpet, opened my rear hatch and let a big fan blow for several days.

I plan to caulk the whole bumper seam area and then try to figure out how to cover my whole bumper since it runs all the way across the rear and is plastic covered that is degrading a bit.

I thought about that silver tread plate stuff but don't know if the make it in sheets that long..........and then there would be the problem of sealing under the edge of it.........and how to cut a curve like that.

I just found some rubberized coating that I may try to get to paint on the rear bumper. Comes in excella blue too......

http://www.ecosafetyproducts.com/Rub...-6010-100f.htm



Robbie R.
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Old 11-04-2009, 07:21 PM   #26
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What a Difference a Day Makes

The trailer is all gutted and ready to be fixed. I'm glad we have gone this far. These Jackson Center guys really know what they are doing. Too bad I didn't stop this leak a few years back.
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Old 06-15-2010, 09:12 AM   #27
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What have others used to seal the top of the rub rail? I was thinking about using Parbond, rather than the heavier Vulkem. I've never used Parbond though so I'm not sure which would be the better choice.

Thanks,
Eric
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Old 06-15-2010, 09:34 AM   #28
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I would use Parbond on the rub rail. It has a tendency to be sucked into the joint space and will give you a finer bead. The Vulkem seems to be stiffer and leave a much larger bead. Like others, I would seal between the bumper and body with the Vulkem. Go slow with the Parbond as it is a mess! But does seem to hold up well.

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