Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-06-2010, 10:11 PM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
Emerson75's Avatar
 
1975 25' Tradewind
Hanover , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 80
Images: 23
Banana wraps layered outside of sidewall...normal?

Hello all,

I've just started to address some early rear end separation and water leak concerns. The first thing I've done so far is pull the rub rail around the rear of the trailer. What I discovered is that the banana wraps are mounted on the outside of the side wall panels. Is this normal? After some searching I found one other person who mentioned having the same issue on his AS. It would seem odd to have been designed intentionally that way. Is is possible or recommended or worth while to reverse this design, by placing the banana wraps under the side walls? I was not planning to take the banana wraps off when removing the belly pan, if possible. If this layering issue is normal for the banana wraps to be mounted on top of the side walls, is it typical to just apply a healthy bead of vulkem to the banana wrap seam underneath of the rub rail (along with sealing the top of the rub rail) to prevent the banana wraps from catching water and allowing it to seep into the belly pan?

Between the rear trunk/bumper design and the banana wrap/sidewall layering, it seems like water leakage was almost invited, kind of frustrating.

Thanks,
Eric
__________________

__________________
Eric, Stacey, Easton, Annabelle, Gretzky (boxer), & George Bailey (basset hound)
1975 Tradewind - Family owned and operated since 1975
2005 Chevy Tahoe Z71
Emerson75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2010, 10:17 PM   #2
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerson77 View Post
Hello all,

I've just started to address some early rear end separation and water leak concerns. The first thing I've done so far is pull the rub rail around the rear of the trailer. What I discovered is that the banana wraps are mounted on the outside of the side wall panels. Is this normal? After some searching I found one other person who mentioned having the same issue on his AS. It would seem odd to have been designed intentionally that way. Is is possible or recommended or worth while to reverse this design, by placing the banana wraps under the side walls? I was not planning to take the banana wraps off when removing the belly pan, if possible. If this layering issue is normal for the banana wraps to be mounted on top of the side walls, is it typical to just apply a healthy bead of vulkem to the banana wrap seam underneath of the rub rail (along with sealing the top of the rub rail) to prevent the banana wraps from catching water and allowing it to seep into the belly pan?

Between the rear trunk/bumper design and the banana wrap/sidewall layering, it seems like water leakage was almost invited, kind of frustrating.

Thanks,
Eric
Eric.

That construction method is normal.

Any water that might leak into the underbelly because of that construction, causes "zero" damage or problems, since it simply runs out the underbelly.

But, if you wish, you can seal the top side of the "rub rail" molding, which would eliminate the possible leak, and make you feel better, too.

Andy
__________________

__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2010, 11:49 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
1976 25' Caravanner
Vintage Kin Owner
Campton , New Hampshire
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,113
From reports by others , and what I have seen , it was done both ways , even in the same years , and sometimes even on the same trailer . Guess it was up to the worker-of -the-day , or maybe which direction they ran the production line that day , like odd or even days , who knows .
__________________
ticki2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2010, 12:38 AM   #4
Maniacal Engineer
 
barts's Avatar
 
1971 25' Tradewind
Menlo Park , California
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,223
Images: 1
Blog Entries: 4
Remember, you want lots of circulation of air in the belly pan. There's no way of keeping water out, esp. if you trailer in the rain, and a moist environment isn't good for either the wood floor or the steel frame.

- Bart
__________________
Bart Smaalders
Menlo Park, CA
http://tinpickle.blogspot.com
http://smaalders.net/barts
barts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2010, 10:43 AM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
adwriter73's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 352
Images: 9
I agree. This was a poor manufacturing decision. It turns this thing into a cup.
adwriter73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2010, 02:01 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
Zeppelinium's Avatar

 
1975 31' Sovereign
1973 27' Overlander
1977 23' Safari
Palmer Lake , Colorado
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,908
Send a message via Skype™ to Zeppelinium
Quote:
Originally Posted by adwriter73 View Post
I agree. This was a poor manufacturing decision. It turns this thing into a cup.
That's what I thought, at first. However, putting the banana wrap under the shell/skin would make for a maintenance issue if you needed to work on the banana wrap or the outriggers.

Sealing the top of the trim band is a good solution. In all my trailers the shell comes down far enough that it covers the floor plywood, so it stays reasonably dry, even as water runs into the belly pan. Water in the belly pan is not a big deal, as long as you don't try to seal it tight. The original design allows for good drainage and altough this looks "wrong" at first, it makes sense, too. Remember, if you start to seal things up, you better be 100% sure that there can't be a leak, or you're just creating a trap and big problem. It's better to leak a little and drain, than to leak extremely little and drain not at all.

Zep
Zeppelinium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2010, 04:49 PM   #7
4 Rivet Member
 
adwriter73's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 352
Images: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeppelinium View Post
That's what I thought, at first. However, putting the banana wrap under the shell/skin would make for a maintenance issue if you needed to work on the banana wrap or the outriggers.

Sealing the top of the trim band is a good solution. In all my trailers the shell comes down far enough that it covers the floor plywood, so it stays reasonably dry, even as water runs into the belly pan. Water in the belly pan is not a big deal, as long as you don't try to seal it tight. The original design allows for good drainage and altough this looks "wrong" at first, it makes sense, too. Remember, if you start to seal things up, you better be 100% sure that there can't be a leak, or you're just creating a trap and big problem. It's better to leak a little and drain, than to leak extremely little and drain not at all.

Zep

It seems there should be a better drain system though. Almost like foundation vents on a pier and beam house.
__________________

adwriter73 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Will plastic banana wraps fit on a 1961 Ambassador? RoverOwner Belly Pans & Banana Wraps 3 09-15-2008 09:49 PM
Painted banana wraps LI Pets Belly Pans & Banana Wraps 0 01-14-2007 05:02 PM
Reattaching banana wraps? Mike B Belly Pans & Banana Wraps 2 05-10-2004 05:44 AM
"New" banana wraps j54mark Belly Pans & Banana Wraps 10 10-28-2003 09:36 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.