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Old 10-04-2015, 08:08 AM   #43
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1963 19' Globetrotter
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Originally Posted by ALANSD View Post
what is done for the lifters that spin but do not raise the vent?
I think my issue is similar. The hinge that attaches between the lifting rod and vent cover popped off lifting rod. How does that attach to rod? Can it be re-attached? Is the rod supposed to spin where it attaches to hinge? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!!
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Old 10-04-2015, 08:21 AM   #44
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The Hehr lifter rod was "peened" into the hinged bracket that attaches to the lid. It was a friction fit after the rod end was expanded on the bracket hole. There is not supposed to be any movement between the two parts. Twisting these apart on a "frozen" or stiff lifter is a common issue. I have seen two types of repair:
1) Welding
2) Drill and tap the rod end for screws and washers. Might have to use two small screws and/or lock tite to keep the rod end from being able to spin in the bracket.

If the lifter is stiff, crud and corrosion must be carefully cleaned out from inside the spiral track. Use of a pentrating oil may help. Do not try to force the lifter to move. If it is totally frozen, it may be corroded in place and may not be able to be saved. Penetrating oil may help free it. There are other methods that have been tried with some success, including partial disassembly, freezing, and carefull tapping in a with a hammer to break up the corrosive bonds.
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Old 10-04-2015, 08:24 PM   #45
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I have drilled out a couple of them, and then put in a self-tapping machine screw. Be certain to use a lock washer and, as I did, some blue thread lock liquid. Should be fine. Yes, they need to be cleaned periodically. Any residual oil makes for flypaper/dirt trouble that will gum up eventually. I clean them and lube w a dry silicone spray. Still, periodic cleaning is a good idea. Don't force them and they will serve you well.
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Old 10-05-2015, 09:57 AM   #46
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I have drilled out a couple of them, and then put in a self-tapping machine screw. Be certain to use a lock washer and, as I did, some blue thread lock liquid. Should be fine. Yes, they need to be cleaned periodically. Any residual oil makes for flypaper/dirt trouble that will gum up eventually. I clean them and lube w a dry silicone spray. Still, periodic cleaning is a good idea. Don't force them and they will serve you well.
The old original vent cover operators, were designed to have some internal friction. The purpose of the friction was for the operator to stay in a selected open position while the coach is on the highways. The problem with them, as they aged, was the friction part, no longer existed.

When the internal friction of those operators was history, then simple vibration would further open the vent, which in turn, would blow off the trailer, when a on coming large vehicle would pass the trailer.

That was a very common occurence when I worked for Caravanner insurance company. I am sure that the same thing continues to happen today.

A redesigned vent operator is available, that replaces the original, does not depend on any friction, since it uses a threaded rod for opening and closing the vent. Therefore vibration has no effect on it.

Lubing the original operator makes it easier for it to further open, simply going down the road.

CAUTION: If the friction of the old operator is gone, then make sure the vent cover is completely closed when traveling. That will stop the cover from being blown off.

Andy
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Old 10-06-2015, 11:30 PM   #47
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Good point on the effects when the friction is gone Andy. I and others go further when travelling and use a bungee cord to keep the lifters from turning. Apply the cord from the front knob to the rear knob holding them in the full closed position.
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Old 10-11-2015, 07:55 PM   #48
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Thanks for tips. Doesn't seem to be a good original design IMHO. I went with the drilling/tapping solution. I used threaded rod with loctite and put a fender washer and lock nut on other side of hinge. So far, so good. I'm sure I'll have to be careful with them.
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Old 11-25-2016, 01:37 PM   #49
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Just an update - and thanks - for everyone's thoughts on how these Hehr / LeDeux lifters work... and more importantly, your ideas for how to repair them.

After one of ours came loose from its hinge (which is riveted to a VTS reproduction Astrodome) I found a local metal fabrication shop with a bench press and wide variety of taps.

I supplied them with small machine screws (maybe 1/4" diameter and 1.5" long, something like that) and washers; they were able to tap the solid bar in the end of the lifters, thus securing the lifters to the lid. FAR more peace of mind than the way they were "peened" in to begin with.

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Old 12-01-2016, 09:36 AM   #50
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Hehr repair manual
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