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Old 10-28-2013, 11:23 PM   #1
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water leak detector

Any advice on the name of a good, reliable water leak detector purchase. Need something I can rely on to monitor my Bambi floors. Do not see any brands names posted on forum. Thank you
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Old 10-28-2013, 11:59 PM   #2
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I use this one

Sonin 50211 Rapitest 10% to 28% Pinless Analog Wood, Concrete, Plaster, Carpet, and More Moisture Meter - Amazon.com

I like it because the two probes are on the end of a coiled cord allowing you test hard-to-reach areas. It works well. I found four damp areas by probing the interior perimeter of our Airstream, poking it through the vinyl into the plywood subfloor. This was confirmed correct when I had Airstream Service Center do a pressure leak test on the trailer, and they found the source of those leaks directly above where the test meter indicated.
The leaks were two mounting rivets on the street side lower awning mounts, a loose entrance door screw, and a loose latch on the back window.
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Old 10-29-2013, 12:01 AM   #3
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I bought a 3-pack of the Zircon alarms. They run on a 9-volt battery and, by using some double-sided tape, they can be stuck to the floor in a cupboard. I had had a leak from my water pump, and the alarm stuck next to it went off. They really do work well.

Zircon 63931 Leak Alert Electronic Water Detector Batteries Included, 3-Pack - Amazon.com
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Old 10-29-2013, 06:09 AM   #4
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Sonin also...easy to use. The probes work well as noted, also around the skylight and vents.

Bob
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Old 10-29-2013, 07:55 AM   #5
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I have 4 of these. They have alerted me several times to rear leaks. Shop around for better price.

New & Improved Water Alarm
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:41 AM   #6
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I use three of these, under the bed storage cabinet at the back and underneath the bathroom. I'll be getting two more, one for the kitchen and one for the front. I like that the water detection cables can reach inaccessible places easily.

I had a leaking washer in the bathroom plumbing, got an alert immediately before anything had a chance to get damaged. Well worth the money.
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:19 AM   #7
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Thanks to all of you for replying to my post. I am going to look into all of them. Just one more thing....Something else I cannot figure out...There is a 3" gap between the bottom of trailer and the bottom of the plywood floor which is covered with a moisture barrier. To me it seems if there was a leak, causing water to accumulate in the shell floor, would not bother anything other than create an area for moisture to form because of the barrier. And, my rotting point seems to be between the top flooring tile and the plywood. Which leads me to think it is a moisture accumulation problem. Another thing making me think along these lines is the fact that most of the screws I pull out of the inside of trailer have a rusted tip. In addition, I replaced the top tile less than a year ago and the floor seemed in very good shape. I had purposely examined for leaks before laying new floor and did not detect any problem other than a leak in my fresh water plumbing lines which I repaired prior to any damage. Also, there are no pipes or tanks anywhere close to the right front of the Bambi. Anyway, guys and gals, this is my dilemma and this probably should be posted somewhere else? I know, I know, this is what I get for thinking!!!!! Many, many, thanks for your input. Tom
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:22 AM   #8
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I can't find the thread but someone posted about an moisture alarm that had 4 metal probes on it that could be punched through flooring so that it would monitor the subfloor for moisture and it would alarm. I liked this because by the time water puddles on the floor, your subfloor may already be rotten.

Perry
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:32 AM   #9
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Ya know fellas, I just read about each product you suggested and came up with the idea of utilizing a combination of the units you mentioned. One good thing about this forum is the fact it gets me to THINKING, which can sometimes be dangerous. Thanks bunches
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:00 AM   #10
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Tom, another good but time-consuming way to find moisture around the perimeter of the plywood subfloor is to unscrew and examine the screws holding the edge trim piece. They should be shiny. If they are corroded, there has been a leak, you just don't know when.

You found some rust so it would be good to follow this with a moisture detection meter as mentioned, especially after a good soaking rain.

That sheet of material under the plywood floor is intended to be insulation, which is good, but probably traps moisture, which is bad. That's why it is important to inspect (probe) the plywood for moisture regularly, maybe quarterly depending on the climate you live in.
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:55 AM   #11
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Leak Detecting - SNIFF

I told ya'll..I am thinking again..Has anyone tried this:

1. Get burning incense and container, such as used in Catholic churches, close off everything, doors, windows, etc., turn the furnace on low to provide an intake of air and, don't laugh, give her the sniffing/smoke test on the outside. With my wife's nose, she could probably detect a leak from inside the house.

2. And--I am not finished yet--If there is such a thing...I do believe that the smoke a person uses to approach bees hives--or a smoke that I am not aware of--doesn't smell, nor would it stain anything (I don't think). Again, utilizing the intake of air from the furnace to build up pressure from the inside, smoke up the inside of trailer. The smoke would seek the path of least resistance and go out any leak holes (hopefully).

Maybe, there are some of you that know of a "smoke," that would be better to use. Just a thought, people...besides I wanted to give ya something to laugh about in case ya needed something. In addition, I am going to purchase water leak sensors that have been suggested in this forum to make sure.
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Old 10-29-2013, 12:04 PM   #12
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Believe me, I didn't mean to kiss anyone with that icon posted...I hit the wrong one and couldn't figure out how to delete it.....Oh well, Lowes. Home Depot, here I come....
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Old 10-29-2013, 12:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mocus View Post
I told ya'll..I am thinking again..Has anyone tried this:

1. Get burning incense and container, such as used in Catholic churches, close off everything, doors, windows, etc., turn the furnace on low to provide an intake of air and, don't laugh, give her the sniffing/smoke test on the outside. With my wife's nose, she could probably detect a leak from inside the house.

2. And--I am not finished yet--If there is such a thing...I do believe that the smoke a person uses to approach bees hives--or a smoke that I am not aware of--doesn't smell, nor would it stain anything (I don't think). Again, utilizing the intake of air from the furnace to build up pressure from the inside, smoke up the inside of trailer. The smoke would seek the path of least resistance and go out any leak holes (hopefully).

Maybe, there are some of you that know of a "smoke," that would be better to use. Just a thought, people...besides I wanted to give ya something to laugh about in case ya needed something. In addition, I am going to purchase water leak sensors that have been suggested in this forum to make sure.
What you are suggesting is basically an inverted twist on a residential blower-door test. A residential test uses a relatively high volume fan to create a pressure differential between inside the house and outside with the inside pressure being lower (negative differential). Your method would result in a positive differential. Given the relatively low volume fan in the furnace and the number of built-in "air leaks" that will never be a source of water leaking I doubt if you will be able to build up sufficient positive inside pressure to detect a real leak from the outside. But I see no reason that a BD test couldn't be performed on a trailer. Look for a local home energy audit company.

Just my 2c.

Good luck finding your leak(s)!

Wayne
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Old 10-29-2013, 04:35 PM   #14
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I absorbed most of what you said until you mentioned the "BD," test. I cannot figure that one out. Thanks for your response...appreciated.
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