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Old 03-08-2013, 03:03 PM   #1
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airflow in jalousie windows

I'm concerned about the air coming in through closed jalousie windows. We will be living in harsh weather conditions, really hot and snow storms. What can we do with these windows to ensure we stay warm?!
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Old 03-08-2013, 03:16 PM   #2
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If you don't care about seeing through them, you can do the sorts of things people do with skylights and vista views... stuff in an insulating "plug" that both blocks airflow and provides some insulation.

I suppose if you wanted to see through them you could devise some sort of fitted plastic replacement for the screen that you could swap back to the screen when the weather is nice enough for airflow.

I've never seen a practical way to make them actually seal when they're closed.
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Old 03-08-2013, 07:46 PM   #3
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airflow in jalousie windows

Greetings jrossingaul!

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Originally Posted by jrossingaul View Post
I'm concerned about the air coming in through closed jalousie windows. We will be living in harsh weather conditions, really hot and snow storms. What can we do with these windows to ensure we stay warm?!
If the jalousie windows that you are referring to are the ones Airstream utilized beside the entry door on beginning sometime in the 1950s and ending in 1964, there are a number of things that can be done to make them more weathertight. The first is to insure that each pane of glass is the correct size as too much or too little overlap can invite both air and water leaks. Adjusting the spring clips to more firmly hold each of the glass panes can help a bit as well. You can also add Jalousie Window Weather Seals along the ege of the glass so that the glass panes seal more fully against one another . . . see this link.

It is also possible to make an interior storm window with lexan . . . an attachment method will likely need to be devised depending upon the model of your jalousie windows. In my Overlander, mirror clips can be utilized for this purpose, but such may not work on all models.

Good luck with your investigation!

Kevin
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:21 AM   #4
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Jalousie windows

It is a 64' and we have that side window next to the door and one more on the other side. I'll definitely get the individual seals and also look into those other suggestions for the inside, thanks!
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Old 03-09-2013, 06:38 AM   #5
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A last ditch solution is to get some clear packing tape and run it across the edges of the glass to stop the drafts. It won't be pretty, but it will help.
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:27 PM   #6
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dirty jalousie windows

I have jalousie windows on the street side too, but these ones are double paned and filthy! There's moss growing in there, its pretty gross. Its about $170 to replace all of them. Is there ANY way I can get around replacing them?
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Old 03-13-2013, 05:23 PM   #7
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Just clean them and replace the weatherstripping.

Jalousie windows look cool and operate easily They're great in protected locations, in temperate climates. I have them in the bathroom on my C-11. They are sort of a hallmark of vacation home construction of the 50s and 60s, and in my mind enjoy a degree of charm for that reason alone.

They do tend to leak however even when well maintained.
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Old 03-13-2013, 06:59 PM   #8
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airflow in jalousie windows

Greetings jrossingaul!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrossingaul View Post
I have jalousie windows on the street side too, but these ones are double paned and filthy! There's moss growing in there, its pretty gross. Its about $170 to replace all of them. Is there ANY way I can get around replacing them?
You have a coach with a custom feature (streetside jalousie), and it is among a very small number of coaches with that special order feature. I have only seen such coaches from a distance but assumed that they had the same standard window glass that is found in the standard curbside window next to the entry door. I am wondering if the original glass may have been replaced with some sort of Thermo-pane glass aftermarket. Unless each pane is surrounded by a metal frame, I suspect that it would be impossible to separate the panes . . . and separation may not be possible even if there is a metal frame surrounding the panes. I suspect that the current window material could be replaced with standard glass, but it might be necessary to order a heavier glass to make up part of the thickness of the thermo-pane.

Something else that is possible. The streetside jalousie panes may be safety glass that has begun delaminating resulting in issues. Whether thermo-pane or laminated safety glass, I have a feeling that replacement of the glass may be about the only option unless it is a "framed" thermo-pane. Something that may be worth trying before giving up would be to remove one or two panes and run them through the regular cycle on your automatic dishwasher to see if that makes any difference.

Good luck with your investigation!

Kevin
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:12 AM   #9
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They are a different glass than the jalousie windows on street side. They aren't individually framed. Heard they were an older version of safety glass than the other jalousie window, which doesn't make sense to me if they were replaced. Anyway, I'll try the dishwasher and see it it works. They are really cool, thank you!
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Old 07-16-2015, 06:31 PM   #10
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Vintage trailers often didn't have pane tip seals because these trailers were built for warm weather camping. Later ones sometimes had pane tip seals that you may be able to get at Vintage Trailer Supply if your windows are the compatible. This is not always what you need though and, frankly, I think it's too much trouble/expensive. Here's what I do for my '60 Nomad canned ham. Get ordinary 5/16" thick "peel & stick" foam weatherstrip at a hardware store and apply it to the inside bottom edge of panes. This keeps out at least 95% of the drafty stuff... remember, you DO need some seepage to breathe. This lasts only about a season then I scrape it off with a single-edge razor blade in spring... I want my windows to leak in warm weather to prevent fogging during rains since I'm a bare bones, old-school camper & don't have/want AC. Cheap, easy & effective.

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