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Old 07-15-2014, 09:12 AM   #15
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This is what I used...

Scotch 1 in. x 60 in. (25,4 mm x 1,52 m) Outdoor Mounting Tape-411/DC at The Home Depot

I'm in the developmental stages of illustrating why I think people have difficulty using a sealant like silicone, vulkem, butyl... instead of the tape in '67,'68 window clamp bars. You shouldn't have to put your windows in upside-down to make them fit. I won't believe that the contour of replacement glass is the same as original until I see it. Heat temper and chemical temper and the difference in thickness has to make a difference. I'm told that the replacement glass fits the frame perfectly, and this makes me suspect, because my original corning window must flex to fit the frame.

No one in the world knows more about glass than Corning. To me, It appears that Corning had something in mind about the flexibility of the glass to make a good seal. It's possible that the reverse engineering of the replacement manufacturer missed the flexibility factor. Maybe I'll never know, but I'm currently suspect.

I used the scotch mounting tape with original Corning glass and my windows fit the seals with no more than .030" deviation from the body contour. Perhaps an anomaly, or Airstream Miracle?
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Old 07-15-2014, 09:56 AM   #16
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I agree with the "flexible" glass concept. My 66 Corning windows seem to flex when I draw them shut. They are only 1/8" thick. I do not know how the glass bar to glass fit is configured...yet.

I clearly understand the 3M tape method with your excellent diagrams. Way to go! I am following this thread with interest.

David
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Old 07-15-2014, 08:24 PM   #17
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Wow, these diagrams really help! It looks like you "cradle" the glass on three sides with the .050 foam tape. Is that a correct understanding - since this is being asked by someone that has just a fraction of your understanding of this? Also - in your original reply, you specified a 10 lb hold tape - not the 5 lb hold tape. Am I correct in making the assumption that your replies and diagrams are based on using the 10 lb maximum hold tape by 3M?
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Old 07-15-2014, 08:31 PM   #18
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Doug - I think this is close - but not "it"! In Aluminuminum's first response, he states using "Scotch 3M outdoor double sided, 1" wide, ten pound mounting tape". Your link to Amazon is fo the correct tape - but for a 5 pound version of it. I also found the 10 pound version of it at Amazon. Bases on his latest response and diagrams, I plan on getting the 10 pound hold variety just in case it has something to do with the thickness of the tape itself. Just a guess, but just in case...

Chester
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Old 07-16-2014, 12:17 AM   #19
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Hi There,


The illustrations are a bit primitive, but show the general idea.


I didn't check, but I think the ten pound tape is outdoor rated and five pound is indoor. They're right next to each other at the store, so you'll see. I recall the release film on the ten pound to be red, and five pound is maybe mostly white.


The ten pound outdoor tape is grey foam with red release film. I think it is important that the glass centers in the channel exactly as corning intended. The rack and pinion winder mechanism appears to stop at a specific point of closure and if the glass is “cocked” in the head-rail channel, it'll be a bit too open or closed more than intended by Corning. This could matter.


The 1966 head-rail is a different animal. It is a single piece extrusion. There is no clamp-bar, just a channel to which the glass is siliconed into. If your '66 windows are original, then I wouldn't attempt to reseal the glass to head-rail unless they have become loose in the channel. I don't think it possible for the window to leak there. Parallel to and above the head-rail, at the hinge, it's known to leak for sure, and water can get in at either end of the head-rail, but in order to leak through the actual glass to aluminum interface, water would have to defy gravity and penetrate an inch of silicone sealant.
Removing unbroken glass from 1966 head-rail channel is a dreadful task. It took me a week of silicone softening and digging with fifteen different bottles, cans and tubes of every toxic solvent, carcinogen, and a few silicone specific “lifters”. I used fine Japanese razors and jeweler's saws and finally got enough softened and removed to slip a violin string at one end and pulled it through to the other. I did this with the window out of the trailer upside-down with the head-rail clamped in a vise. I would never try it while on the trailer. I'd guess that Corning/Philips bedded the glass into the 1966 head-rail just the way they wanted, an it should be left alone.


We don't get hurricanes on The Great Lakes, but my resealed windows have experienced Gale driven rain on a Lake Superior beach. One of the windward side, windows dribbled a about an ounce overnight through the head-rail hinge as you would expect. There is a “shop fix” for this where you squirt tons of silicone or “clear sealant” into the seam while wagging the window up and down so the window hinge doesn't seize as the sealant cures, but I can't imagine the horror if you ever had to remove the head-rail, so I'm not going to do it, I'll just be aware. It doesn't leak in a light rain. The type 4 window would have a gasket in the hinge.


The head-rail dis-assembly images shows where there was a grey an clear sealant at the ends of the clamp-bar. The clear may be a later “shop fix” using silicone. The grey is Parbond or Acryl-R type sealant and appears to be original assembly. Can't say surely, but I question why otherwise use the two different sealants here? I dabbed the ends of my type 3 clamp-bar with silicone and have yet to detect leakage there.


Wm



Images... 1966 head-rail extrusion (it was a rough Winter for my "outdoor" vice)
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Old 07-16-2014, 05:28 AM   #20
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It has been my experience that the top 1" of the gasket is the most important part of the seal. It is very common to see some type of sealer interfering with the gasket to glass contact. I recommend to all my 66-68 customers to replace the window seals every 3-5 years as if it is annual maintenance.

no one picked up on it but the OP said he was removing the par bond with a thin cutting wheel in a dremel. Please do not do that. You are going to scar your skin when you slip and it is not going to get the par bond out. Solvent and a rag work much safer.
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Old 07-16-2014, 08:02 AM   #21
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Aluminum in UM: Thanks a bunch for the photos of a 66 "Type 1" head rail extrusion. I now have a clear picture of the top of my windows. I thought is was two pieces some how, not extruded together. I can sure see how the hinge arrangement would leak!

And I am gaining further knowledge on the two stack windows in my 66.

While in Jackson Center, I noticed most of the techs had Acryl R dispensers on their tool boxes. I purchased a dispenser while I was there. It comes with an easy to clean tip. I have found it very effective small gap sealant.

David
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:34 AM   #22
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Window gasket/seal


There is no agreement as to which type gasket/seal to use along the two vertical jams and sill. The rectangular solid foam v the hollow “D”tops the list, but other gasket types have been used with unreported results.
No one has surfaced to say, “I was there in 1966 and remember that Airstream window gaskets looked like …??” Where's a witness?? The old, apparently original gaskets that I removed from my 1968 GT looked like the square foam style replacement available today, so that's what I used. Whether it is formulated to have the same compressive resistance as the original gasket, I don't know. I also don't know if it is 1968 original.


If it is what Corning/Philips specified in the sixties, I'll trust it. Corning isn't going to put their name on something that doesn't work. Corning makes the windows for the US Space Shuttles and Space Stations. Here on Earth, Corelle plates and Pyrex. No Contest.


When the window is being pulled shut by the silly little sill winders, somewhere along the body contour, the vertical jamb gasket becomes the fulcrum for the flex of the glass. The amount of loft and resistance provided by the gasket determines how deeply the glass seats into the gasket, and how well the glass curve matches the body curve. Said before, mine have no more than .030” deviation top to bottom, visually undetectable and don't leak yet. I mop the gaskets with Aerospace 303 hoping to prolong the gasket's resilient quality.


Sorry, I have to break here as I'm being dragged off to the “Art Fair”...
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Old 07-16-2014, 03:24 PM   #23
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Maybe we are being way to scientific on 66 to 68 Airstream window leak fixes. There is a 68 Globetrotter not far from our RV park. I took particular interest in the Type 3 window leak fixes. I think this tape is readily available. Maybe it worked? Have a look:

David
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Old 07-16-2014, 03:42 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALUMINUMINUM View Post
Window gasket/seal

No one has surfaced to say, “I was there in 1966 and remember that Airstream window gaskets looked like …??” Where's a witness??
.
There should be. In 2009 I met the guy who bucked my trailer together in 1962.
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Old 07-16-2014, 03:45 PM   #25
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On a more serious note, I did notice the 68 had drip rails over the windows. See photo of the 68 Globetrotter below. My 86 has drip rails over the windows too. But my 66 does not. I think this drip rail helps a bunch to keep normal rain water out of the upper hinge. But not wind driven rain. Maybe Airstream wanted to sell smooth, slipstream exterior design with the new Corning curved glass, frameless windows. Who knows? But I believe drip rails would help reduce window leaks.

I also included a photo of the old seals I scraped off the windows. I wonder if they were original? I replaced them with the Vintage Trailer Supply 5/8" square rubber seal with 4 sealing ribs molded in. I haven't leaked tested them yet.

David
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Old 07-16-2014, 08:26 PM   #26
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Hmmmmm...Drip rails! My 68 Sovereign does not have drip rails and does not look to ever have had them. Does your 68 have drip rails just on the straight front and back windows - or also on the curved windows? In looking at my 68 Sovereign, the lettering for the word 'AIRSTREAM' are directly above the front and the rear window leaving no room for a drip rail. The side curved windows have a row of large beautiful round rivet heads directly above them again leaving no room for a drip rail. Was the one on your 68 added on afterwards?
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Old 07-16-2014, 09:54 PM   #27
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Eyebrows

My '68 Overlander came with these "eyebrows" over the windows. They are clearly commercially made. I am stuck with them as the original install method involved lots of self tapping screws and the holes they make. I'm not crazy about the look, but they do keep the water out. There is not one on the front window.

You can supposedly saturate the window hinge with silicone sealant as described above and the hinge will leak less.

Good to read about bedding tape. Makes sense. VTS recommended RTV to me.
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Old 07-16-2014, 11:08 PM   #28
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Thanks for the picture! It looks like they were installed just under that row of rivets! I don't know if I'm crazy about them either - BUT - if the bedding tape doesn't resolve the issue, I might be able to live with something like this. Sure would hate to put all those extra holes in her though!
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