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Old 05-04-2010, 04:41 PM   #1
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Now, i'm over it....

My door blew open on the highway and cracked the frame at the lock. I had the door welded. This weekend I riveted the interior/exterior skins on and rehung the door. The door seems to be racked at the top. This year model has a cast aluminum frame. Ive have tried to find a welder to help, so far no go... they seem to be an elusive bunch. The guy that welded it originally is in ft.worth...too far to tow an unregister AS without a door.


Plan B find a door frame replacement for a 1970 27' International.
Which year models are interchangeable? Any sources??
Thanks, Cynthia
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:50 PM   #2
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I saw one that is from a 68 Tradewind on the classifieds. Will it fit my 1970?
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:54 PM   #3
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Cynthia,

It's rather difficult to weld cast iron. Cast aluminum you almost never weld. I suspect that is why you're having a tough time finding someone to do it.

If anyone will do it at all, I'd recommend the TIG process. That MIGHT do it. But, to be honest, I've never heard of anyone welding cast aluminum.

Well, I say that, and I just lied to you: My grandpa had a guy try to weld a cast aluminum motor mount for him for a Saturn 4-door Sedan (an L300) that was in a wreck. The guy who welded it was a certified master welder, and he used the TIG process. He said he didn't trust it to hold. I bought the car...the weld failed. I spent the $60 and bought a new motor mount for it.

Bottom line: It's near impossible to weld cast aluminum.

Sorry to be a rain cloud...but good luck with your project.
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:15 PM   #4
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I saw one that is from a 68 Tradewind on the classifieds. Will it fit my 1970?
1969-1972, all models except Caravel (that's the narrower body).
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Old 05-04-2010, 08:29 PM   #5
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Here you go.




http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=27635

Website for Welders,

Did a search for "welding cast aluminum" Got to love the web.

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Old 05-04-2010, 10:38 PM   #6
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Had my door blow open twice now once because the lock failed and it blew open on the highway and once when we inadvertantly did not latch the door completely closed and a strong gust of Texas wind caught it and blew it open when we were parked. I replaced the door lock and replaced the door hold back that was also broken. The door is racked or bent at the top also. In reading the threads on the forum about A/S doors blowing open the bend out of shape is common. My frame is not cracked but the door will not bend back into shape. I think I discovered the reason why. After I repaired the door I also replaced the rivets that had popped that held the inner skin to the frame and added a few more new rivets. The sandwich of the inner and outer skins rivited to the frame is what makes the door stiff. I am in effect stopping the door from being bent into the correct shape by reriviting the inside skin. My plan is to remove the rivets from the inner door panel, make a jig by tracing the pattern of the door opening onto a 2X6 or 2X8. Cutting the wood along the pattern to make the jig and then clamping the door to this wooden pattern that mimics the arc of the door frame and then reriveting the inner panel to the door frame. I don't think the frame itself is the strength of the door. It is a hollow core door with two aluminum sheets attached to the frame. The frame forms the overall shape and provides a place to mount the latch and hinges but the attachment with rivets of the two skins to the frame makes the door very light weight and very strong.
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Old 05-05-2010, 06:00 AM   #7
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Had my door blow open twice now once because the lock failed and it blew open on the highway and once when we inadvertantly did not latch the door completely closed and a strong gust of Texas wind caught it and blew it open when we were parked. I replaced the door lock and replaced the door hold back that was also broken. The door is racked or bent at the top also. In reading the threads on the forum about A/S doors blowing open the bend out of shape is common. My frame is not cracked but the door will not bend back into shape. I think I discovered the reason why. After I repaired the door I also replaced the rivets that had popped that held the inner skin to the frame and added a few more new rivets. The sandwich of the inner and outer skins rivited to the frame is what makes the door stiff. I am in effect stopping the door from being bent into the correct shape by reriviting the inside skin. My plan is to remove the rivets from the inner door panel, make a jig by tracing the pattern of the door opening onto a 2X6 or 2X8. Cutting the wood along the pattern to make the jig and then clamping the door to this wooden pattern that mimics the arc of the door frame and then reriveting the inner panel to the door frame. I don't think the frame itself is the strength of the door. It is a hollow core door with two aluminum sheets attached to the frame. The frame forms the overall shape and provides a place to mount the latch and hinges but the attachment with rivets of the two skins to the frame makes the door very light weight and very strong.

Zepp did something along the same line though the vintage differs. See post #46 of http://www.airforums.com/forums/f381...?highlight=cry
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Old 05-05-2010, 07:00 AM   #8
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I think you would have to bend the top of the frame in more then is necessary, before you re rivet it because of spring back. Most times with any metal, you need to bend it more then what you want the final shape to be, as it always springs back somewhat to the shape it was before it was bent.
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:00 AM   #9
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Quote:
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1969-1972, all models except Caravel (that's the narrower body).
Thanks Terry,
SADLY, Guess that Im a year too early for this one... ,
Cynthia
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:02 AM   #10
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Wonder if I heat it up with mapp gas...would that help to reshape ?? Grabbing at straws here...
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Old 05-05-2010, 10:10 AM   #11
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Quote:
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Zepp did something along the same line though the vintage differs. See post #46 of http://www.airforums.com/forums/f381...?highlight=cry
Kevin,
Zep is the Tin King, I think. What do you think he does in his "spare" time?? Ill take a look at his thread.
Thanks for the info. Cynthia
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:02 AM   #12
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Kevin,
Zep is the Tin King, I think. What do you think he does in his "spare" time?? Ill take a look at his thread.
Thanks for the info. Cynthia

Rumor has it he pulled a gig with Garland back in the late 30's then quickly realized his future was in aluminum instead of tin.

YouTube - Wizard of Oz--Doroty Meets Tin Man
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:22 AM   #13
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Oh, I see...He has a thing for pigtails and alumninum
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:48 AM   #14
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I guess what I was trying to say is that the frame does not make up the major structural integrity of the door. If you can get the frame and outer skin back into the correct shape to fit the door opening and then rivet the inner skin in place it will hold that shape because of the "shear" strength of the rivets holding the skin to the frame all around the perimeter of the door. You could also reinforce the frame by fabricating a "mending" plate from aluminum that overlaps the crack by several inches and then attach it to the inside of the frame behind the inner skin. I would bond it to the frame with epoxy and a couple of rivets. The epoxy and rivets bonding the strip to the frame will again form a very strong shear force to stop bending at that point. To illustrate my point...if you have ever built a piece of furniture or cabinet that come broken down in a box it was pretty flimsy until you attached the backing which is generally a piece of 1/8 inch fiberboard that is pretty flimsy in itself. Once the backing is attached to the frame you could stand on it and it will not bend. One more point when I searched the Forums about bent doors another problem came up and that is if you take the door off the trailer and then reshape it the hinges may not line up when you try to reinstall it. So I'm going to do mine with the door open but mounted on the hinges on the trailer.
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