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Old 05-19-2016, 01:01 PM   #1
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1956 22' Flying Cloud
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1956 door in door question

My 1956 Flying Cloud has the door within the main entry door, and I am rehabbing both doors. The hinge originally attached to the main door with some rivets and some screws (screw holes now are empty):
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Similarly, the hinge originally attached to the door-within-a-door with some rivets and some screws (screw holes empty):
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Can anyone explain why Airstream used the combination of screws and rivets? Aluminum rivets would be better, wouldn't they, in terms of future corrosion? The original screws had corroded considerably.

I want to insulate and close up the door-within-a-door, but if I am going to use buck aluminum rivets instead of screws, I need to do that first.

Thanks for any advice.

Hank
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Old 05-19-2016, 01:18 PM   #2
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I rebuilt the door on my '59 and I used these bad boys.
Stainless Steel, 5/32" dia. These were the correct length for going though the hinge and skin.
My first order from Bay Fastening. I was impressed by their website, pricing, and order fulfillment
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Old 05-19-2016, 01:52 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markdoane View Post
I rebuilt the door on my '59 and I used these bad boys.
Stainless Steel, 5/32" dia. These were the correct length for going though the hinge and skin.
My first order from Bay Fastening. I was impressed by their website, pricing, and order fulfillment
Thanks, markdoane. I imagine that stainless would do well to hold the doors.

Did you choose those over bucked rivets? Did you have access from behind to buck rivets?

Thanks, Hank
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Old 05-19-2016, 02:06 PM   #4
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I used stainless because that was the closest to what was used originally.
The 1959 door hinges are slightly different than your 1956 model. It appeared to me that the hinges on mine were stainless steel. Your's may be aluminum or maybe Monel, I can't tell from the picture.
At any rate, mine looked like stainless so that's what I used. Took a long time to find the proper rivets.
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