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Old 10-31-2015, 07:00 PM   #15
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Two Lifeline GPL-6CT AGM batteries will give you 300 a.h. for the same footprint as the Trojans.
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Old 10-31-2015, 07:04 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acstokes View Post
Two Lifeline GPL-6CT AGM batteries will give you 300 a.h. for the same footprint as the Trojans.
And a 40% difference in price too.

And the problem I ran into here, is I called around to see if anyone had Lifeline's. And no one does. Nearest place is in Oregon and CA. Freight charges for 4 of them were $225.00. So if someone knows where I can get those without the freight charges. Seems I can order them online, but not get them in person.
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Old 10-31-2015, 08:05 PM   #17
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Bold,

PM me, I think I have a solution for you. :-))


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Old 10-31-2015, 08:14 PM   #18
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We are FAR from having to think about batteries but because our '74 Trade Wind has the battery compartment behind the curb-side axles, I'm thinking of the Trojan T-1275 as a useful upgrade to the run-of-the-mill 80 AH deep-cycle battery.

The T-1275 is spec'ed at 150 AH and only marginally larger than the 80Ah battery. I just need to see how much surgery will be required on the battery compartment.
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Old 11-01-2015, 02:16 AM   #19
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Unhappy Corrections for Inaccurate Amp-Hr Information

I've had several folks advise me relative to my improper AH information in my Quote below.
I stated that with two 6-volt 225 AH batteries I now have 450 AH total, but the correction is that for two 6-volt batteries in series we wind up with a 12-volt system with a 225 AH capacity instead of the 450 AH I thought we had.
That being said, there is a noticeable, substantial improvement with the Trojan batteries over my previous system. I am advised by the battery supplier that the Trojans also have greater longevity than what I was getting out of the previous 12-volt deep-cycle batteries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WindyJim View Post
We did a similar project almost a year ago, only on a slightly smaller scale. Our 25' Airstream had two size 24 batteries and I switched them to two Trojan 6-volts. Increased capacity from approx. 80 AH per battery to approx 225 AH per battery (now 450 AH total instead of 160 AH total). What an incredible difference as we have solar and do mostly dry camping.
Cable size will be determined in part by how large of an inverter you will be using. We do not use our inverter for the microwave or electric coffee pot, so extra large wiring not an issue. The wire we used earlier for the inverter wiring was MARINE wire.
BATTERY CONVERSION NOTES:
Converted from (2) 24-sized batteries to (2) 6-volt golf cart batteries ((2) Trojan T-105 Batteries 2*($125-$10pickup+$20core)+$21.60 tax).
Items:
1. Replace the 3/8" threaded rod (I think I went from an 8" to a 10", or a 10" to a 12", can't quite remember). Rod replacement is not easy because it is threaded through a nut which is welded on the outside bottom of the battery box, and then the rod is seal welded to the nut. You have to grind off about half of the nut in order to be able to unscrew the existing rod. (With the "undercoating" on the bottom of the battery box this was not evident, so thinking that you could unscrew the existing rod took a lot of time. I called the AS factory and the technicians went out on the floor to examine the bottom of the battery box, but still didn't know that the rod was welded. You cannot use a 3/8" rod coupler to extend the rod, as there is insufficient room for the larger gap required between batteries.
2. The size 24 batteries sit in a plastic shell at the bottom of the battery box. My local AS dealer just removes it and leaves it out, if they do the conversion. For me, I removed it, then cut out both ends of the plastic shell so that the golf batteries would sit on plastic in the bottom of the box.
3. The battery box has to be heightened. This was not a problem for my AS, but if someone has a forward storage outside door, they would have to have the box extended down, instead of up as I did it. I had some 1"X3" oak, so i just made a 2 1/2" extension on the top of the box, and moved the lid up, and it was fine. (Our local AS dealer can fabricate a 2" or 2-1/2" box extension, but opted to make my own.)
4. The two new 6-volt batteries have to be wired in series, instead of in parallel as the 12-volt batteries were.
5. I had to use a pneumatic "nibbling" tool to enlarge the propane tank cover cutout to fit the taller battery box (i.e. trim away 2 1/2" of aluminum to make the propane tank cover slip over the two propane tanks and fit properly)
6. The golf cart batteries don't use automotive type posts, so I had to cut off the ends of the battery cables, buy a heavy lug crimper (on ebay about $25), and crimp on some lugs to fit the new battery studs.

Notes: I didn't re-weld the battery hold-down rod, I just used lock nuts on the bottom outside. Also, I took advantage of having the batteries removed and scraped the corrosion out and reprimed and painted the inside of the battery box.
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Old 11-01-2015, 02:39 AM   #20
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has anyone tried the 6v interstate batteries?
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Old 11-01-2015, 07:00 AM   #21
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Bold, we purchased 2 6v Lifeline batteries (300Ah) from BD batteries in Denver last July ( the actual company is in Ca. I believe) for $394 ea. with free shipping. Arrived here in Taos in 4 days from ordering. RV & Marine Deep Cycle Batteries by Lifeline Batteries
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Old 11-01-2015, 12:08 PM   #22
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I don't understand why all that power is needed, but then again my 1958 22' Caravanner has every system (and interior configuration) different than any other Airstream ever built, modified or retrofitted. My T-105s weigh 62# each so I mounted them in the rear to mostly offset my 142# 3500 watt dual fuel electric start generator on the tongue. Might you run into a changed tongue weight issue? I obviously do not know how your 27 footer came from the factory (but for fun am going to try to locate the batteries on the floor pan). Note: My now tongue weight is the same as original at 300# and can never vary because my floor plan used the same formulas necessary for load planning any USAF cargo plane.. And yes, all interior contents use a nesting paradigm, fold, or inflate and are carried in the cargo bed of my Cadillac Escalade EXT.
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Old 11-01-2015, 04:08 PM   #23
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Your new system, when properly installed w/ venting case, exhaust piping, stronger tie downs, heavier cables, etc. will put 1,000#s on the ball with empty water/grey/black tanks and storage. Perhaps more weight on your leading axle too. 16.6 % on ball is maybe a bit too much. Trojan AGMs must have ventilation according to Trojan guidance. Do not be fooled by claims to the contrary. For a 1500 Dodge, crew, 4 x 4, load levelers for OTR must be right. Note to prior post: I use "point of use " 1# refillable propane bottles so warm propane inside stays efficient even at -20 degrees F. outside. I keep 20 full and costs $.75 each to refill from a tradeable 20#er. No 20#ers on tongue to change tongue weight empty to full or vice versa. Where the queen bed platform hinges might have to change to get easier access.
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Old 11-02-2015, 08:21 AM   #24
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Um... ok


Anyways, can someone clear this point up. The 75-50% depletion rule.

If I have two Lifelines for example at 300aH that basically means I only have 150aH available? Otherwise I risk the life of the battery discharging it further?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigButtUgly View Post
I don't understand why all that power is needed
The reason for the 4 batteries is to have the larger number of aH available. So I'm assuming 4 batteries would give me the total of 300 aH if using Lifelines and 220 aH if using Trojans. Even though the combined banks would be 600aH and 440aH.

We boondock and dry camp a lot.

----

Also of note, those 300 aH Lifelines are bigger than the Trojan T105, the comparable Lifeline is the GPL-4CT which is 220aH and the same size.
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Old 11-02-2015, 11:02 AM   #25
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We have a 1976 Overlander with useless curbside battery box mounted between the entry door and front axle. Only a group 24 battery appeared to fit this box. This spring I installed 2 x 6V batteries under my kitchen sink in a sealed box. Added a vent to the outside, note this requires drilling a 2.5" dia hole through the skin. Meausre twice and cut one was more like measure 10 times and cut once (still with a pit in my stomach in case I made a mistake). I must say the 2 volt batteries producing 235 AH in my case have been awesome. I also have a portable solar panel 85w which is wired through the battery box old leads. It has made a huge improvement.

In regards to your 2 x parallel and 2 x series this is how I have our off-grid cabin wired up. I used Crown 6 volt wet batteries for that application. Previous Trojan T-105's lasted 10 years in that application with an 85w solar trickle charge. WE only use the cabin on long weekends, and it is in a climate that sees temp from -32 to + 100 every year.

Note that numerous supplies have told me that in the last 5 years Trojan batteries have decreased their quality. I am not sure if this is the same for the AGM family, but the wet batteries Crown was highly recommended.

Good luck and happy camping "off-grid".
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Old 11-02-2015, 04:22 PM   #26
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Some really big considerations here that the wife and I need to discuss as a couple for our Airstream.

Started this thread with a firm plan in mind, but now considering the GPL-6CT, but with it's increased capacity comes increased weight. Plus the price increase. And here is the thing, it's almost half way to 300 aH of lithium. But there are some hidden costs I suspect with Lithium. I am not sure if my solar charge controller is compatible and I know my converter is not compatible.

But lithium would way significantly less. So the costs and differences are all over. We are towing with a half ton, so there is that too.

Going to review all our options and reapproach this thread again later this week.
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Old 11-02-2015, 07:50 PM   #27
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Bold,

You could DIY a lithium LiFePO4 300 AH solution for less than $2000. You can find 3.2 V, 300 AH prismatic cells for about $400. Combine that with (4) BMS cell modules from EV Power, Australia (about $19AUS each) and add a BMS control unit from the same company with a disconnect switch for $175AUS, add a fuse and your there.

Not sure why your converter isn't compatible. Is it a single-stage supply? It shouldn't overcharge the cell. When you're connected to shore power you can also disconnect the cell and let your solar charge the lithium. And what's your solar charger brand? If you can change the voltage thresholds you might be able to make it work.

The reason lithium might make sense for you is that you're willing to put the battery pack inside the AS. LiFePO4 cells don't like freezing and they degrade with high temperatures so they're not a good option if you're trying to put them in the outside box.
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Old 11-02-2015, 08:12 PM   #28
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As I understand it, lithium has a different charging profile than AGM and Lead Acid. My Powermax Boondocker is a 60 amp 4 stage converter.

The solar unit I have is a Bluesky 2512iX MPPT Charge Controller.
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