Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-28-2010, 09:56 PM   #1
1 Rivet Member
 
Stan Drury's Avatar
 
1958 22' Flying Cloud
1996 19' "B" Van Airstream 190
Grass Valley , California
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 15
Images: 52
Location of golf cart batteries

I would like to use two six volt golf cart batteries and an inverter in my 1959 Flying Cloud, but there isn't room for them. Has anyone tried mounting the batteries in a pick up bed, that has a canopy covering it? Then a heavy extension cord could run from the inverter back to the trailer when it was needed.
The batteries would be charged by a 130 amp alternator in a Toyota Tundra. I'm wondering if there would be a problem with charging them in a
covered pickup bed ever though it should get plenty of ventilation.
__________________

__________________
Stan Drury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 10:37 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
Mexray's Avatar
 
1978 28' Ambassador
Morada , California
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,583
I could work...I used a similar set up, mounting the batteries in the pickup bed when we had a truck camper - which worked out good, as the battery cables didn't have much a distance to run...

With your proposed system, I wouldn't use battery cables smaller than #2 AWG sized wire, to cut the DC resistance to a minimum...

You might check out welding cable from a welding supply company near you - this type of cable is very flexible, making it easier to roll up the cables for storage, etc...

I'd also solder all the connections if you use welding cable, and seal the connectors with heat shrink tubing for corrosion and moisture protection...

Make sure you mount the batteries in an enclosure that will secure them from moving around - it only takes a small pebble under a battery to wear a hole in the battery case if the batteries are allowed to mover or 'float' around in the back of a pickup!

I don't think ventilation would be an issue in the back of a pickup with a cover - seems like there would be lots of air circulation to get rid of any hydrogen being emitted...

Ray
__________________

__________________
Ray & Pat; Morada, CA
Mexray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 10:47 PM   #3
1 Rivet Member
 
Stan Drury's Avatar
 
1958 22' Flying Cloud
1996 19' "B" Van Airstream 190
Grass Valley , California
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 15
Images: 52
Thanks Ray, that's good advice.
__________________
Stan Drury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 11:25 PM   #4
Site Team
 
azflycaster's Avatar
 
1975 25' Tradewind
Dewey , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 12,127
Images: 62
Blog Entries: 1
I can see a couple if issues with this setup.

You would have to park your TV in front or right next to the trailer which is not always possible or have very long cables to reach.

Anytime the TV was gone from the campsite you would have to disconnect the cables and have no power to the trailer.

In the event of a break away condition while towing, you would have no power to the brakes if the pin was pulled.
__________________

Richard

Wally Byam Airstream Club 7513
azflycaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 07:27 AM   #5
Rivet Master
Commercial Member
 
lewster's Avatar
 
Vintage Kin Owner
Naples, FL , Hood River, OR
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 7,281
Another problem with your proposal is the battery charging. Your alternator is basically 'dumb', in that it has a single stage charging routine, unlike the new 3-stage chargers found on better converters and inverter/chargers. You will be doing your batteries no favors by charging them in this way, and you should expect decreased battery life without proper 3-stage charging.

Also, if you have to re-charge, you have to run your TV engine, and you will have to fast idle or run at elevated speeds to get any significant amperage from the alternator.

IIWY, I would get a small generator and a quality converter like the IOTA DQS-55 and plug the trailer into the genny whenever you needed to re-charge. Much less maintenance on a small (Honda or Yamaha) generator than your truck engine too.
__________________
Lew Farber...ABYC Certified Master Marine Electrician...RVIA Certified Master Tech ...AM Solar Authorized Installation Center...AIRSTREAM Solar & Electrical Specialist...Micro Air 'Easy Start' Sales and Installations
lewster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 01:14 PM   #6
2 Rivet Member
 
Carson City , Nevada
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 72
I have some experience with Deka AGM Golf Cart Batteries. I installed two banks in my Argosy twin - under the bunks. I installed a maxi-fuse next to each battery and ran the power back to the rear closet and installed a marine switch (1,2,BOTH, OFF) to have a common power point ahead of the fuse panel. These are pretty safe from off-gassing, recharge quickly, and provide a lot of amp hours of service.

I have had zero problems with this set-up and may use the empty battery box for an outside shower head.
__________________
Mike S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 01:52 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
mello mike's Avatar
 
1958 26' Overlander
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,742
Images: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan Drury View Post
I would like to use two six volt golf cart batteries and an inverter in my 1959 Flying Cloud, but there isn't room for them.
Hi Stan. I had the same problem with my '58 Overlander. I modified my A-Frame to support two batteries. I had to move the propane tank mounting base forward about 3 inches, but everything fits fine. I have pics of my modified A-Frame on my blog.
__________________
1958 Overlander
2011 Wolf Creek 850N TC
2011 Ford F-250 Crewcab (6.2L), 3.73RE

WBCCI #5661/AIR #5661/TAC # AZ-6
4CU 1st VP

My '58 Overlander Restoration and Travel Blog:
http://mellomikesairstreams.blogspot.com/
mello mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 02:14 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Jim Foster's Avatar
 
1965 17' Caravel
1983 27' Excella
Walnut Grove/Laguna Woods , California
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,615
Send a message via Yahoo to Jim Foster
I installed two 6v golf cart batteries in our '65 Caravel. The existing battery was located on the tongue behind the propane tanks long ways, side to side. I moved the propane tanks about three inches forward, and installed two battery boxes long ways front to back. Came out great.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P4020320.JPG
Views:	66
Size:	256.5 KB
ID:	114172   Click image for larger version

Name:	P4020327.JPG
Views:	68
Size:	255.2 KB
ID:	114173  

__________________
Past President, El Camino Real Unit WBCCI#6620
Street Rod Builder (see avatar)
Kite flier (check out links below)
http://www.youtube.com/my_videos?feature=mhee
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y1_U2XQ0bI
Jim Foster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 02:24 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
mello mike's Avatar
 
1958 26' Overlander
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,742
Images: 53
Jim,
Looks great Jim. My arrangement is very similar except my batteries are side by side lengthwise.
__________________
1958 Overlander
2011 Wolf Creek 850N TC
2011 Ford F-250 Crewcab (6.2L), 3.73RE

WBCCI #5661/AIR #5661/TAC # AZ-6
4CU 1st VP

My '58 Overlander Restoration and Travel Blog:
http://mellomikesairstreams.blogspot.com/
mello mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 02:40 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
Jim Foster's Avatar
 
1965 17' Caravel
1983 27' Excella
Walnut Grove/Laguna Woods , California
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,615
Send a message via Yahoo to Jim Foster
Quote:
Originally Posted by mello mike View Post
Jim,
Looks great Jim. My arrangement is very similar except my batteries are side by side lengthwise.
I had to turn mine due to the attaching brackets for the chains on the WD hitch. If that had not been an issue, the propane tanks could have stayed where they were. Had to move them forward to make room for the turned batteries.

I could have made a whole new battery holder high enough to clear the WD chains, but it would not have looked nice at all, and would have been lots more work then just moving the propane the three inches forward.
__________________
Past President, El Camino Real Unit WBCCI#6620
Street Rod Builder (see avatar)
Kite flier (check out links below)
http://www.youtube.com/my_videos?feature=mhee
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y1_U2XQ0bI
Jim Foster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2010, 02:50 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
mello mike's Avatar
 
1958 26' Overlander
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,742
Images: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Foster View Post
I had to turn mine due to the attaching brackets for the chains on the WD hitch. If that had not been an issue, the propane tanks could have stayed where they were. Had to move them forward to make room for the turned batteries.

I could have made a whole new battery holder high enough to clear the WD chains, but it would not have looked nice at all, and would have been lots more work then just moving the propane the three inches forward.
I know what you mean. The Equal-i-zer Hitch has much smaller brackets so I was able to mount my battery frame on top (it barely fits).
__________________
1958 Overlander
2011 Wolf Creek 850N TC
2011 Ford F-250 Crewcab (6.2L), 3.73RE

WBCCI #5661/AIR #5661/TAC # AZ-6
4CU 1st VP

My '58 Overlander Restoration and Travel Blog:
http://mellomikesairstreams.blogspot.com/
mello mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 12:23 AM   #12
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
GLENDALE , AZ
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,441
It sounds like you may have already considered this, but locate the inverter closer to the batteries to avoid long runs of heavy 12-volt battery cables. The 110 volt AC cord doesn't have to be nearly as heavy to carry the same power.

We looked at installing an inverter in our boat a few years ago, and we finally abandoned that project. Besides the idea of electrocuting someone in a reverse bathtub, the long, heavy 12-volt cables were prohibitive (you shouldn't put an inverter in the engine compartment of a boat for safely reasons).

However, plenty of ventilation should be provided, as the inverter has lots of potential for igniting hydrogen gas and battery acid. Also, in full-failure mode (arcing, sparking, flaming shorts; i.e., electrical shorts, not the Bermuda- or tidy-whitey-type, although these can also be dangerous) the inverter could cause serious damage to your TV.

If you haven't already purchased an inverter, I'd take a second look at generators. If you haven't used a generator, borrow or rent one overnight or for a weekend, and try a little boondocking. I think you may be pleasantly surprised at what an easy solution this may be. After recently getting a generator, I wonder why we fiddled around with solar and extra batteries for so long.
__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 07:58 AM   #13
Rivet Master
Commercial Member
 
lewster's Avatar
 
Vintage Kin Owner
Naples, FL , Hood River, OR
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 7,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
It sounds like you may have already considered this, but locate the inverter closer to the batteries to avoid long runs of heavy 12-volt battery cables. The 110 volt AC cord doesn't have to be nearly as heavy to carry the same power.

We looked at installing an inverter in our boat a few years ago, and we finally abandoned that project. Besides the idea of electrocuting someone in a reverse bathtub, the long, heavy 12-volt cables were prohibitive (you shouldn't put an inverter in the engine compartment of a boat for safely reasons).

However, plenty of ventilation should be provided, as the inverter has lots of potential for igniting hydrogen gas and battery acid. Also, in full-failure mode (arcing, sparking, flaming shorts; i.e., electrical shorts, not the Bermuda- or tidy-whitey-type, although these can also be dangerous) the inverter could cause serious damage to your TV.

If you haven't already purchased an inverter, I'd take a second look at generators. If you haven't used a generator, borrow or rent one overnight or for a weekend, and try a little boondocking. I think you may be pleasantly surprised at what an easy solution this may be. After recently getting a generator, I wonder why we fiddled around with solar and extra batteries for so long.
Phoenix,

I install lots of inverter/chargers and your fears of hydrogen gas are sound when dealing with liquid cell batteries but they are easily remedied by using AGM batteries. They do NOT outgas unless severely overcharged, a condition which rarely happens. Expensive, yes....worth it....DEFINITELY! They are the only battery that I will install in an RV.

As far as heavy cables, they are used every day in installations in large motor homes. It's not uncommon for me to use anywhere from 2/0 up to 4/0 cable. We use top grade welding cable which is extremely flexible and easy to work with.

And while generators will do the job of keeping your battery bank charged, many folks are moving to solar for that task, as they don't have to carry extra fuel (gasoline) or another component (generator).
__________________
Lew Farber...ABYC Certified Master Marine Electrician...RVIA Certified Master Tech ...AM Solar Authorized Installation Center...AIRSTREAM Solar & Electrical Specialist...Micro Air 'Easy Start' Sales and Installations
lewster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 02:49 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
GLENDALE , AZ
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,441
Lewster, we gave up on the inverter in the boat, because there wasn't much metal in our fiberglass boat for the safety ground. Thus, in my opinion, there was too much of a chance for electrocution, especially when people are usually wet or standing on something wet. Also, all of the warnings on the installation instructions scared me off from using it; just not worth the risk in a boat.

Regarding our Airstream, it is only 19-feet, and most of the roof is already covered with stuff. So, there isn't any room to put enough solar panels to do much. This probably isn't an issue with larger RVs.

For us, a generator is self-contained and has a pure sine-wave output that will run all our electronics without problems, rather than the inverter we were considering, which sounded like our laptop and television might have trouble with. I couldn't find any, but are there solar panels that will produce 1600 watts that will fit on a 19-foot Bambi?
__________________

__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
6 Volts Golf cart batteries marchesi Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 11 06-10-2009 05:42 PM
Charge Wizard and 6VDC golf cart batteries????? cghorgan Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 2 05-18-2009 12:14 AM
golf cart battery in a 1970 tradwind Rollerboy Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 8 02-12-2009 06:37 AM
12 Volt Golf Cart Batteries? Phantom Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 20 11-28-2007 07:29 PM
I want a Golf cart/Scooters dbradhstream Off Topic Forum 20 10-01-2006 07:02 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.