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Old 06-08-2016, 11:09 AM   #15
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Maybe it was mist the converters time to die? They don't last forever!
I use an Iota brand converter. Its specs state usable voltage range of 90-130 vac.
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Old 06-08-2016, 01:43 PM   #16
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Maybe it was mist the converters time to die? They don't last forever!
I use an Iota brand converter. Its specs state usable voltage range of 90-130 vac.
Parallax says that mine can run on 105-130 vac. But what voltage does it receive if the electric company mis-wired? I'd test that outlet.
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Old 06-08-2016, 02:04 PM   #17
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Re-read what I wrote. I specifically wrote about "insufficient current"....not voltage. Since you are familiar with Ohms Law, then you realize that current is represented by Amps. If insufficient Amps exist as I posed, then a C.B. rated at more Amps will not trip.
My point (perhaps not clearly made) was that coming from residential service, something up to 200A is potentially available unless limited by something, in this case circuit breakers or wire resistance. Breakers didn't trip so it must be wire resistance. Increased resistance in the cable, driven from a voltage source (constant voltage independent of current - a good model of the house supply because you get 120V at the outlet whether you plug in a 7W nightlight or an 1800W hair dryer) causes the voltage at the load to reduce. Reduced voltage on a motor under load draws more than rated current. I was trying to convey that I didn't think low voltage at the source was the problem. No breakers tripped, so the line current should have been less than 30 (or 50, depending on the trailer) amps which the connector should be rated for. In my mind, the only logical conclusion is that corrosion or poor connections at the connector and not the extension cord, caused the localized heating at the connector that melted it. The thermal mass is quite small; only a few 10s of watts would be sufficient to cause the damage seen.

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Old 06-08-2016, 02:32 PM   #18
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I apologize, I should have been more clear, but thank you both for you input. I have the regular power cord that came with the Airstream connected to a 30' yellow marine grade power cord. It is this cord that is plugged into the trailer. I wish I knew the exact name/model of the marine grade cord, but the fellow who sold it to me at the boating shop told me he has RVers come in all the time to buy these cords.
. . .
All electrical wire has the American Wire Gauge (AWG) number embossed on the cord. It is hard to read sometimes, but should be there. You can't talk about this issue in a meaningful way without knowing the AWG of each cord in the chain of electrical power, including the OEM cord, which is probably AWG #10, but check yours also.

Calling a cord 30 amp, 50 amp, etc. are secondary identifiers and not as accurate as the AWG specs..
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Old 06-08-2016, 02:35 PM   #19
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I think we are missing something here. With 60 ft of normal shorepower cable, marine or RV, there will not be enough voltage drop to do any damage, as a result of the cord. That assumes a good 120v source and we cannot be certain that his source was adequate.
Larry
Not sure you can conclude this without knowing the exact AWG of each cord. 60' of #10 AWG for 30 amps is really pushing it IMO. Remember, you have to count the return trip of 60' when calculating wire size impact on voltage, right?
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Old 06-08-2016, 03:57 PM   #20
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It might be that the converter was failing first, drawing a heavy current load which was causing the air conditioner to receive intermittently very poor power causing it to shut down and throw a code.

FWIW, I built a panel in my trailer that displays my AC voltage and my AC amp draw.

Right now I am running about 120 feet of 10 ga cord, with my air conditioner running I run 109 volts.


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Old 06-08-2016, 05:24 PM   #21
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. . .
Right now I am running about 120 feet of 10 ga cord, with my air conditioner running I run 109 volts.

Superat stultitia.


Are you suggesting that this is good electrical management? Wouldn't this low voltage eventually take a toll on your A/C motors? 240' of #10 wire (120x2 round trip) seems pretty light for 30 amps, but maybe you are only running a smaller A/C and your converter/charger . . .

PS -- Not to mention the wire lengths inside your house from your main electrical service, and the shorter run of 120 volt wiring inside the trailer to the A/C.
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Old 06-08-2016, 06:00 PM   #22
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Extension Cord Use & A/C

109 volts is generally considered acceptable (not ideal), especially for my old Armstrong.

The Armstrong is only 11,500 btu, but I imagine it draws about at least as much as a modern 13,500 unit.

FWIW, I am in my third season of summering in NM.

The first I was running the same length of cable, the second I was running 35' shorter.

"Good management" or not, the reality of where I am parked in relation to the sub panel that my 30 amp outlet is wired into dictates the length of the cable run.

The outlet is directly under the sub panel, and the sub panel is 140 feet away from the service entrance via 2 ga. wire.

(Technically AC does not really make a "return trip" the way that DC does.)

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Old 06-08-2016, 09:28 PM   #23
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Thanks.

Guess I would consider buying a length of #8 in those circumstances? Seems like a cost-effective tool to own . . .

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Old 06-08-2016, 10:38 PM   #24
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I have $150+ in my #10 cords. They are in their third year of service.

For me, it is so far so good. My air conditioner is being supplied with better than the accepted standard of 120 volts less 10%.

Short of where the cord lays in the sun, it isn't noticeably warmer than the ambient temperature.

I have never seen a reading of less than 109 volts.

Beyond this, back when my antique air conditioner was made, 110 volt was the standard, but even is this was not true and I had a modern unit, all that I have read says that 109 volts is acceptable.


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