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Old 11-24-2013, 02:55 PM   #15
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The easiest solution thus far. No tear up, minimal work but requires a licensed electrician. Not that expensive either.

http://www.generatorsolutions.ca/generlink/
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Old 11-24-2013, 03:09 PM   #16
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When at home, Has anyone figured out a good way to run the extension cord that's plugged into the honda 2000 through the house without leaving a sliding glass door or window cracked to feed the cord into the house?

Once inside, I plug in a couple lamps and the tv.

Any creative pass-through ideas for the cord?

Thanks
What I do several times a year and like last year for Sandy is real simple. A piece of pipe insulation in the slider jamb I canrun several heavy extensions through the bottom of the doorway. Might need a little duct tape to hold it in place. Sal
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Old 11-24-2013, 03:46 PM   #17
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It is completely within the NEC to have a completely separate wiring system within a structure.

Someone I know purchased a very old home and renovated it. During the work, an ice storm had power off in his location for several days. He had a 7500 watt generator. The cost of a complete transfer switch was more than he wanted to spend.

His electrician suggested a single circuit, with a single outlet in each of the most used rooms. The electrician installed generator inlet outside the house. It was fairly cheap, and my friend has used it once since.

If one has access from the outside the house to the main breaker box, there are some creative retrofits for meeting the interlock code. See the pic.

We have done this, and while one has to be mindful to manage total load, it is handy to have access to power throughout the house.

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Old 11-24-2013, 04:02 PM   #18
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The easiest solution thus far. No tear up, minimal work but requires a licensed electrician. Not that expensive either.
Cable hatches run ~$5-8 each depending on features. The Generlink is ~$500-800 (30 or 40 amp capacity with 7,000 watt limit) plus install by a licensed electrician. Many power providers offer a 24 month minimum lease option in the neighborhood of $17-40+ for their customers. The customer provides the generator. "Not that expensive" might apply if home power outages are a regular occurrence!
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Old 11-24-2013, 04:07 PM   #19
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A short piece of 2" rigid conduit (looks like galvanized steel pipe) through a wall will allow an extension cord plug to come into the house and keep doors and windows closed. One can put standard plumbing caps on each end when the pipe is not in use. You would need the insulator bushings on each end of the pipe when in use to keep from chafing the extension cord. Some paper towels wadded up around the extension cord will prevent air flow when in use.
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Old 11-24-2013, 04:16 PM   #20
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Getting back to the gentleman's original question: My garage doors have a flexible rubber seal running across the bottom - I run my generators outside the door and simplely run the cords under the closed door - this provides a weather tight seal around the cords. Works every winter when we loose juice to winter storms and the two or three weeks they shut of the electricity when the summer fires threaten. A lot less expensive than the solutions above - what with the cost of equipment and the labor for certified electrician to do the install - last time I heard it was about $1,500 to $2,000 to install around here.
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Old 11-24-2013, 08:33 PM   #21
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generator use at home

I have a 2000i watt Honda and a 2800 Watt Yamaha 2800I that we have used for situations as you mentioned several times. I cut a round hole big enough for the plug of the extension cord to go through the wall between the garage and the basement. I feed the extension cord through that hole and then fill in the any gap with some cloth, fiberglass wool or the like. I place the generator just outside of the garage. If it rains I place the generator just inside the garage with the exhaust facing outside and close the garage door just enough to vent the exhaust.

I used both generators for about 6 days after Hurricane Sandy last year and was able to keep the refrigerator, TV, computer freezer etc. running. I don't leave the generators going during the night.

When I get my electricity back I plug the hole with a 35 mm film canister that closes the hole perfectly.
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:08 PM   #22
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Time out.

I'm not connecting this to my house wiring. I simply want to pass it the extension cord through the exterior wall of the house when I am powering a lamp and small dorm refridge and or tv when we lose power.

I'm not looking to install a sub panel etc, I'm just looking for a little door or plug as this would probably be used just once or twice a year.
For what your talking about doing you can get a a weatherproof box with a male plug in it. You can get one at an electrical supply and it is called an inlet box. Run Romex thru the wall to a duplex outlet on the inside wall. Of course if you live somewhere where you have to deal with building codes you may need to hire this done,
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:07 AM   #23
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We just had a transfer switch installed to do this. The inlet is outside, not far from the new RV outlet he also installed, and the transfer switch is on the wall near the breaker box. That's the best solution.
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:20 AM   #24
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We just had a transfer switch installed to do this. The inlet is outside, not far from the new RV outlet he also installed, and the transfer switch is on the wall near the breaker box. That's the best solution.
For the sake of safety, one reminder, if you'll forgive me…

Before connecting a generator to house circuits, make sure you remove the utility company's main breaker at your meter. That ensures there's no way you could back-feed current into the municipal lines and shock a worker who thought the line he was working on was inert.

If you have a proper transfer switch this may be belt-and-suspenders precautions, but still…
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:04 AM   #25
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If you have a proper transfer switch this may be belt-and-suspenders precautions, but still…
I believe I mentioned the transfer switch twice.

What you describe is unnecessary as long as the transfer switch is wired correctly. It's electricity, not magic. It's not going to flow through an open switch. Also, if I switched off the master, how would I know when power has returned?

And, in fact, if I did try to backfeed, the generators would shut down immediately - my two Hondas aren't enough to even power my own house, let alone anything upstream. That would be an immediate clue to me there's something wrong.

Finally, and I know several die each year this way, but those guys working on the lines ought to be taking the proper precautions too. Or perhaps the power companies should start doing something to reduce the frequency of power outages in the first place so that we all don't feel like having a generator at home is a necessity.

I can't believe you chose MY post to pick on, one of the posts with an actual per-code solution, installed by a licensed electrician and inspected by the county, while ignoring some of the rather dubious **** that has been posted in this thread.
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Old 11-25-2013, 10:48 AM   #26
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For the sake of safety, one reminder, if you'll forgive me…

Before connecting a generator to house circuits, make sure you remove the utility company's main breaker at your meter. That ensures there's no way you could back-feed current into the municipal lines and shock a worker who thought the line he was working on was inert.

If you have a proper transfer switch this may be belt-and-suspenders precautions, but still…
"Remove the utility company's breaker"? Do you mean turn it off? Either way, a transfer switch makes this step completely unnecessary. A transfer switch will feed power from ONE SOURCE ONLY; either utility power or the generator in this case. If the transfer switch is correctly wired it would be impossible to "back-feed" generator power to the utility line.
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Old 11-25-2013, 05:42 PM   #27
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"Remove the utility company's breaker"? Do you mean turn it off? Either way, a transfer switch makes this step completely unnecessary. A transfer switch will feed power from ONE SOURCE ONLY; either utility power or the generator in this case. If the transfer switch is correctly wired it would be impossible to "back-feed" generator power to the utility line.
Here in New Orleans, there is a removable breaker built into the base of the meter. You pull it out, and reinsert it backwards, so the connectors are facing outward, before firing up the generator. If you fail to pay your bill and Entergy shuts you off, they pull the breaker and take it with them, and you don't get it back until you pay in full. I guess that's why they go with a removable breaker. In other municipalities it may be a cutoff switch at the meter, but they probably have fewer deadbeats.

You're right about the transfer switch; if you have a properly-wired manual or automatic transfer switch, you're good. No way to backfeed. But not everyone who runs a generator at home installs a transfer switch first, so it was meant as general advice.
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Old 11-25-2013, 06:49 PM   #28
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Off topic a bit here, but for those thinking a small generator set can't power anything on the utility's side, it can.

The transformer that steps down power from the distribution grid to the 220 volts supplied to a residential meter will step up any voltage supplied by a genset to the grid.

Meaning, a lineman expecting a dead primary wire will get 7200 volts or more if the genset is backfeedlng the line.

At that voltage, not much current is required to kill someone.


Regards,

JD
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