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Old 08-14-2012, 05:36 PM   #1
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Tail, Marker lights, wire loom? 1958 Traveler

Trailer is a 1958 Traveler 18'.

Can anyone provide tips on servicing the wire loom? It has weathered so much that the plastic wire casings are cracked and brittle. I would like to change it out, but not sure if I need to drop the entire belly pan just to do this.

Where (typically) do the wires run? Along the frame? Inside the walls? I am hoping that I don't have to tear the whole trailer apart to service this wiring.

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Old 08-14-2012, 07:15 PM   #2
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1955 22' Flying Cloud
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On my 55 FC the wires route directly up through the floor and C channel into the interior wall space, split up and route directly to the different lights. No fuses or anything else to clutter things up- or to keep them safer either! From the way mine were routed you might be successful on some of the runs by trying to fish new wire but I doubt you will be able to replace all of it this way. Probably gonna hafta remove at least the lowest course of interior aluminum for access. Sorry about the bad news.
This would be the time too upgrade your electrical system both for safety and functionality. Do it right the first time.
tim
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:55 PM   #3
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My 1964 Bambi II is currently at the local dealership having the brake wiring redone. They had told me that much of my wiring was in pretty bad shape and the plan was to replace the entire brake wiring assy. I stopped by today to take a look at what they were doing. If anything they understated how bad the wiring was. It looks a lot like yours does. It was worse than I expected all very brittle and cracked. They were able to get to the interior wires by cutting a couple of 6X9 inch holes in the belly pan and will be riveting pieces back in to cover and seal the holes. Much of the interior wiring that I can see does not look much better. I will be replacing those sections when I swap out the converter and batteries.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:33 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rumrunner View Post
...snip.... Probably gonna hafta remove at least the lowest course of interior aluminum for access. Sorry about the bad news.
This would be the time too upgrade your electrical system both for safety and functionality. Do it right the first time.
tim
I was afraid of the inevitable! Luckily (sort of), I have the entire trailer gutted to the floor. I didn't want to take the interior skins down, but the only way to inspect the wiring. Oh so many rivets!

The new axle/electric brakes need to be tied in also. I need to look at the vent wiring to change it from 110v to 12vdc which is an additional challenge. If I keep going, and do everything right, I might have the shell off the frame. ha ha. I am trying really hard not to get to this point. haha.

Thanks for both of your replies!
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Old 08-15-2012, 07:03 PM   #5
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I tried really hard not to go shell off too Cuyeda, guess whats on the pad now? I'm hoping to get the shell back on before the snow flies.
tim
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Old 08-15-2012, 08:26 PM   #6
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1954 22' Safari
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wall panels, rivets

I had to remove several wall sections to replace rotted floor sections (the inner perimeter of the body skin has flanges which screw into the outer edges of the floor wood). It really goes along fairly quickly and easily. Use a sharp drill bit, try not to enlarge to rivet hole, in all, piece of cake.
Nice chance to install some shallow, plastic, recepticle boxes, too.
You'll get it, don't worry.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:17 AM   #7
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I removed the lower front interior wall, and exposed the wiring. Just like "rumrunner" said, it comes up from the under the belly pan, and into the C channel of the wall. I cut the wires, removed the old harness, and slipped a new 7 wire harness back in the same hole. Tested all of the exterior tail and running connections for 12v.

Next step is to remove more of the lower wall on the street side to expose more of the wiring course. I need to add an electric brake wire to the mix for the new axle. The previous axle had the old hyrdraulic system.

Thanks for your replies.
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