Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-13-2012, 05:46 PM   #15
Rivet Master
 
1975 29' Ambassador
Reno , Nevada
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,351
What with the belief that O rings go hard after 20 years and all copper tubing is crappy thin wall stuff and such things, I don't think your problem is with the pipe material ...

The bit about special tools is also in this line as you can do PEX with nothing more than a knife and a good grip.

There are more options for PEX fittings than there are for just about any other pipe but that is probably a problem, too, because it means making a decision. I'm currently favoring Flair-IT types but a neighbour is having some problems that appear to be due to poor install technique so I'm re-examining that one. The fittings I've used for the last 10 years or more seem OK, though.

Quote:
Use what works for you. ::shrug::
This is probably the best advice, I think. I'm still using polybutyl with Quest fittings from when I redid the plumbing 20 years ago. PEX is the modern equivalent. I've also used CPVC, copper, and iron depending upon circumstances. Isn't it nice to have so many options?
__________________

__________________
bryanl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2012, 06:32 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
Mikethefixit's Avatar
 
1977 27' Overlander
Trotwood , Ohio
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,153
Send a message via Yahoo to Mikethefixit
I have to go with "what works best for you". I used PEX and Sharkbite fittings.I bought mine in 10 foot sticks at Lowes. I replumbed all the rear bath area and hot water from back to front. I went in well.When I fired up the system I only had one leak because of installer error. I was an easy fix when ya get the PEX plugged into the sharkbite fittings correctly. YUP I make mistakes too.
__________________

__________________
Roger & MaryLou
___________________
F350 CREWCAB SW LONG BED
7.3 liter Power Stroke Diesel
1977 27ft OVERLANDER
KA8LMQ
AIR # 22336 TAC- OH-7
May your roads be straight and smooth and may you always have a tailwind!
Mikethefixit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2012, 09:16 PM   #17
Rivet Master
 
worldinchaos's Avatar
 
1959 17' Pacer
Long Beach , California
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minno View Post
Yah - I can find white too, but that is so boring...

I've looked at Menards, Home Depot, and Lowes, and all three around me carry white, blue, and red pex. Different shades of the blue and red depending on which store you shop at. Plus, the oxygen barrier pex intended for hot water heat is another color yet.
I wish I lived near you. They only sell the blue and red at HD and Lowe's near me in some stores, and then it's only in 50' rolls. I need only ~15 feet of blue and 4 feet of red. Ah well, guess I can't be picky about everything. White it is.
__________________
- Peter (and Marie)
TAC CA-15

1959 Pacer 18' Renovation - Knight in Shining Armor

Our Adventure Blog - Documenting our backpacking, hiking, camping, and Airstreaming
(still updating, haven't gotten to the Airstream trips yet)
worldinchaos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2012, 09:44 PM   #18
Rivet Master
 
Splitrock's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Sioux Falls , South Dakota
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,398
Blog Entries: 20
I used pex from the OEM inlet and regulator to the crossover, then I used the crossover copper and then back to pex. I made all connections with flexible braided stainless steel. If I had it to do over, I'd do it exactly the same.
__________________
Click on the link to see a picture of the Sioux River falls near my home.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v1...g?t=1278182564
Eastern South Dakota is very pretty with hills, rivers, and trees.
Splitrock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 06:26 AM   #19
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
I know for a fact the O-rings don't last forever because I have replaced a lot of them. I also know that the copper pipe in my house is less than 20yrs old and has pin holes in it from corrosion. I also know my folks have a house that has copper pipe that was made in 1946 and they have never had corrosion related leaks. I have never had a leak from PVC or CPVC pipe joints. If they don't leak when you turn the water on you are usually good. My trialer has PB tubing in it now. There are lots of jury rigged connections that are leak prone in it now. I have never had enough guts to hook it to city water. I am working on external leaks at the moment and then I will turn towards the potential internal ones.

Perry

[QUOTE=bryanl;1133426]What with the belief that O rings go hard after 20 years and all copper tubing is crappy thin wall stuff and such things, I don't think your problem is with the pipe material ...
__________________
perryg114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 07:47 AM   #20
Rivet Master
 
jdalrymple's Avatar
 
2009 27' FB Flying Cloud
1991 35' Airstream 350
Jay , Oklahoma
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,602
Perry, sounds as though your choice is made?

My home was built in the mid 80s, and plumbed in the polybutylene that was prone to failure. In fact we qualified for some of the class action money. I found that info out while searching the web to find out how sorry a product the polybute was.

We replumbed with pex, mostly because of the ease of use. The house is on a slab, so the plumbing had to go in the walls similar to wiring. Ten years in and no problems. We did use the brass fittings and crimp rings. We got around the tight location problems by pre- assembling what we could in the open and keeping the crimps required the the tight spots to a minimum.

Regards,

JD
__________________
Jeff & Cindy
'09 27FB Flying Cloud
'91 350 LE MH
jdalrymple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 09:13 AM   #21
Rivet Master
 
Denis4x4's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
Currently Looking...
Durango , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,111
Did an extensive remodel and used PEX throughout. However, fired the plumber and the new guy pointed out that the PEX warranty calls for the use of PEX fittings. Replaced five where we could get to them and crossed our fingers for the rest of them. I think the first guy cleaned out his shop truck as there were three different styles/brands out of five fittings.

However, I don't see this as a problem on an AS as the system is not under pressure 24/7.
__________________
Denis4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 09:38 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
Minno's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
Lexington , Minnesota
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by worldinchaos View Post
I wish I lived near you. They only sell the blue and red at HD and Lowe's near me in some stores, and then it's only in 50' rolls. I need only ~15 feet of blue and 4 feet of red. Ah well, guess I can't be picky about everything. White it is.
Here's an online store that I've bought heating supplies from before. They sell red and blue pex in 20 foot lengths, as well as all sorts of heating and plumbing fittings. For kicks, I put a blue 20' pex pipe in the cart and did the shipping estimate to me. Shipping costs as much as the pex...

JM Eagle EverPex Radiant Heating Tubing Pex Tubing Manifold

You could color code the white pex with red and blue tape wrapped around the pipe close to each end, or even use a red and blue sharpie, to help keep from crossing hot and cold if that's a concern.

Chris
__________________
Minno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2012, 09:59 AM   #23
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
I bought a bunch of PEX stuff already, some of which I can take back. If I go PEX I won't use the sharkbite type fittings except in emergencies or in places where it is easy to get to.

Perry

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdalrymple View Post
Perry, sounds as though your choice is made?

My home was built in the mid 80s, and plumbed in the polybutylene that was prone to failure. In fact we qualified for some of the class action money. I found that info out while searching the web to find out how sorry a product the polybute was.

We replumbed with pex, mostly because of the ease of use. The house is on a slab, so the plumbing had to go in the walls similar to wiring. Ten years in and no problems. We did use the brass fittings and crimp rings. We got around the tight location problems by pre- assembling what we could in the open and keeping the crimps required the the tight spots to a minimum.

Regards,

JD
__________________
perryg114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2012, 09:18 AM   #24
Rivet Master
 
1975 29' Ambassador
Reno , Nevada
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,351
re: "My trialer has PB tubing in it now. There are lots of jury rigged connections that are leak prone" -- Shell lost a lawsuit back in the 90's on this and the plumbers had some good business for a while replacing the aluminum crimped acrylic fittings in a lot of mobile homes.

Hard water is hazardous to copper and iron.

Chlorine is hazardous to plastics (including PVC).

Nothing last forever.

In a TT, the pipe size comment above seems pertinent. Rather difficult to get smaller sizes of PVC or CPVC.

But, if it's not one thing, it's another ...
__________________
bryanl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2012, 09:45 AM   #25
Patriotic
 
Chuck's Avatar

 
1973 23' Safari
North of Boston , Massachusetts
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 4,533
Images: 260
Is it really advantageous to use 3/8ths for the hot lines? The factory plumbed mine with 3/8ths for hot, and 1/2 for cold...but it seems that most people re-do with 1/2 for both.
__________________
Air:291
Wbcci: 3752
'73 Safari 23'
'00 Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 QC
Chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2012, 10:39 AM   #26
Rivet Master
 
toastie's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
1955 22' Safari
Great Lake State , .
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,459
I went with 1/2” copper, all lines will see 55 max / 30 min psi at all times, my 55 Safari was a clean sheet of paper design. Will not use any anti freeze, can remove water pump, hot water and fresh water tanks for winter storage. Water traps are waterless and the only problem that I see is to make sure all water is removed from toilet valve. HOWEVER, if I was doing just a remodel I would go with PEX for sure.

toastie
__________________
toastie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 10:04 AM   #27
3 Rivet Member
 
bganso's Avatar
 
1994 30' Excella
Truckee , California
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 214
Images: 1
Crimping Tools

I'm replacing both the galley and bath faucets.

I'm using Shark Bite fittings in the bath area where I had to cut the existing vinyl pipe. I'm not sure this was PEX tubing. Using a standard cutting tool, the pipe flattened out before cutting all the way through and remained slightly deformed although I was able to slip the Shark Bite fitting on the end. Once all the work is complete, I can complete the hook up and check for leaks.

Two questions: 1) What's your experience with the existing vinyl plumbing vs. the newer PEX or Shark Bite fittings, am I likely to have a leak? 2) The salesman at Ace hardware said most plumbers use hydralic crimping tools for PEX fittings. Ace only sells one that works in conjunction with a pair of channel lock pliers for leverage. It seems these will work just fine, but what's the consensus of this group?

Bruce
__________________
bganso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 10:28 AM   #28
Rivet Master
 
1988 25' Excella
1987 32' Excella
Knoxville , Tennessee
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,164
Blog Entries: 1
have no idea what the group consensus is. I like and strongly reccomend the pex. I use the stainless steel crimp type rings. the tool is $40 from Lowes or Home Depot. It works on both 3/8" and 1/2" lines. It is a complete racheting tool. I think modern pex is better than the gray tubing in my 25 year old airstreams. but a lot of that stuff is still in there and not leaking. what has happened is that the PO's let it freeze. I use the brass fittings with the pex. If you let it freeze the plastic fittings are better. I am not going to let it freeze. I really do not see a reason not to use the Pex with the crimp fittings. I just replaced a pvc line under my deck that we let freeze. After seeing what that looked like I will never use PVC again for anything. I just got my tool and replaced it with a single run of Pex with a couple of the purple clamps to turn corners. 2 joints, 5 min to run what took and hour with the pvc, and I bet it lasts.
__________________

__________________
Bill M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.