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Old 04-09-2004, 03:59 PM   #15
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OK! If I can figure out which thingy to check I will do so. Thanks
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Old 04-09-2004, 10:56 PM   #16
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I too question how good the tankless RV-500 unit is for the folowing reasons:
It is awfully small, most tankless home water heaters such as the Aquastar125 are almost 3 times the size and the Aquastar125 is rated for one use at a time, one shower, one load of wash etc. That said, I am considering a larger model for my house.

The Precisiontemp website has specs for the RV-500 that say:
" there is an 85 degree rise per gallon per minute."
and
"at 2 GPM of water 20lbs of propane will produce over 940 gallons of hot water"

I cant really find any more information than this on their site or anywhere on the web.
What I am wondering is what is the temperature rise at 2GPM? I doubt its 85 degrees, and how hot is the "Hot Water" in the second quote above

The Aquastar125 has a 125,000 BTU input and has and does 2GPM @ 90 degree rise and 2.4 @75 degree rise
The RV-500, as stated above, does an 85 degree rise per gallon per minute. but it has a 53,000 BTU input
Sooooooo... comparing the Aquastar home unit which is designed for one use at a time (one use being a 2.5gpm use) My guess would be, based on the Precisiontemp specs (or lack thereof) that the RV-500 would be able to generate less than half that. Now 2.5GPM could be considered a lot for an RV shower, and maybe... maaybe at a 40 degree rise the RV-500 could do 2 or 2.5 GPM, but I think if you wake up on a chilly morning and wanna take a hot shower and have a 35 to 45 degree inlet water temp, which is not unusual in many parts of the country.... your shower is gonna be 75-85 degrees, which I guess is tolerable -but its not hot. Maybe the RV-500 is better than that, maybe worse, Im just sceptical when the manufacturer doesn't list the rise over a variety of flows, or at least at the flow which is most important- the shower.
The RV-500 is costly at over $800 and you must also consider your application. If there is a waste and water hookup, maybe the RV-500 would be a better option, the hot..err.... warm shower would be continuous, but if you have to worry about your grey tank filing up, or running out of fresh water when boondocking you arent gonna stand there with the water running constantly for 20 minutes taking a shower. In that situation woudn't you rather have your short spurts of shower water much hotter thant 80-ish? Especially if the tank style water heater costs much less?
-now if you ran 2 RV-500s in series.........

-AM
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Old 04-09-2004, 11:12 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amfab
The Aquastar125 has a 125,000 BTU input and has and does 2GPM @ 90 degree rise and 2.4 @75 degree rise
...
My guess would be, based on the Precisiontemp specs (or lack thereof) that the RV-500 would be able to generate less than half that.
If you read my previous post, you will see similar conclusions, I think. The RV500 is rated at 50,000 BTU/hr which is about 40% of the Aquastar model you cited.

But also keep in mind that the RV500 is rated at about 4 times the heating capacity of the normal tank type RV water heater.

Comparing household water heaters to RV water heaters is probably good only to get an idea of the limitations of the RV lifestyle.

What an RV use of the RV500 would get is a more efficient water heater that would not be completely useless after only 5 gallons. It could also replace the furnace burner with appropriate additions.

The Aquastar is nifty in that it doesn't need electrical power like the RV 500 but it is not built for RV application. I also don't know whether your typical RV propane system could feed it properly.
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Old 04-10-2004, 02:12 AM   #18
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I was comparing the two units only to give some idea of what the output in usable hot water of the RV500 is because the manufacturers specs on the website do not provide this information. I was not suggesting the use of a home unit in an RV application.
-AM
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Old 04-17-2004, 01:23 PM   #19
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Aquastar 125 for RV ?

"The Aquastar is nifty in that it doesn't need electrical power like the RV 500 but it is not built for RV application. I also don't know whether your typical RV propane system could feed it properly."


I am restoring a 31' Sovereign & am considering using an Aquastar 125 home unit...if I can find a good place to mount it.
Why would RV propane feed be a problem ?
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Old 04-17-2004, 02:58 PM   #20
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Quote:
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I am restoring a 31' Sovereign & am considering using an Aquastar 125 home unit...if I can find a good place to mount it.
Why would RV propane feed be a problem ?
There are two limitations. One is the capacity of your regulator (although most of these will handle maybe 200,000 BTU) and the other is the size of the tubing. You might need to use half or 3/4 inch ID tubing to provide the 100,000 BTU of propane needed. There isn't much leeway here.

But your biggest problem with a home type instant water heater is likely to be the flue and proper ventilation.

Most of the folks I have seen who own the RV500 seem quite happy with them. They fit into the same space a typical 10 gal water heater would and provide hot enough water for a good shower. The only negatives I have heard involve a slight delay in getting hot water.

I am thinking that the flow rate to work the Aquastar might be a drawback on its use in low volume water situations.

Good luck with the remodelling! Keep us posted on what you learn!
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