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Old 03-27-2008, 06:17 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganglin
Any 10 gallon Atwood heater will replace your old Bowen 10 gallon without body modification. You should install a bypass kit while you have the plumbing apart if you didn't have one before. A 3 foot section of 3/8th flex gas line from Lowes etc. will make your install much easier - you can spray paint it silver where it shows under the trailer.

Save the small square of foam from the heater packaging - it's great to shove under the bottom rear of the new heater to firm up the installation. This is the one we just installed last fall and it seems to be a nice unit - heats up quickly on electric. WATER HEATER GC10A-4E-10 GALLON GAS/ELEC-ELECTRIC IGNITION available here and elsewhere online

RV Water Heaters and Parts


The old door and vent will not direct fit the new tank and to use it, on the new one, will take more work than I was willing to do anyway. The new one should come with a door that is white - you can sand it lightly and spray paint it.

Don't throw away the old door and vent and hinge. You may want to fiddle with it later - if not - put it out on Ebay and watch it sell.

The ATWOOD WATER HEATER- G10-3E 10 GAL LP GAS-ELECTRIC IGNITION seems to have all the features referred to in the discussion above. The Cut-out dimensions for this unit are described on-line as: 16" wide, 15-1/2" high, and 21" deep.

I took some rough measurements before I tossed my old Bowen. According to what I wrote down the access plate was 18" wide and 17" high. The Bowen unit itself measured 17-1/2 wide, 15-1/2" high and 19-3/4" deep.

So the new Atwood unit should be 1-1/2" smaller or have a slightly smaller width but the same height. The depth of the new Atwood would be 2-1/4" shorter.
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Old 03-27-2008, 06:25 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monocoque

I took some rough measurements before I tossed my old Bowen. According to what I wrote down the access plate was 18" wide and 17" high. The Bowen unit itself measured 17-1/2 wide, 15-1/2" high and 19-3/4" deep.

So the new Atwood unit should be 1-1/2" smaller or have a slightly smaller width but the same height. The depth of the new Atwood would be 2-1/4" shorter.
The measurements are a little different but the flange set up is different. If you old G10B fit - the new one will fit. The one you had is the exact same as the unit we replaced. Yes - you do pick up a little new clearance in the rear.
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Old 03-27-2008, 06:59 PM   #17
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Todd,

Are you planning on replacing it before or after the new frame is done? I would not replace an appliance until the foundation is set.

Having said that, I would go with a 10 gallon with DSI (Direct spark ignition) or get a tankless water heater as seen on the VAP.

Steve
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Old 03-27-2008, 07:45 PM   #18
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call palomino parts before you buy, I purchased a 10 gallon DSI w/110 electric eliment, and door, plus a 22" suburban range for less than Camping World wanted for just a pilot light version w/door (before shipping and tax) too.
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Old 03-27-2008, 11:20 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by soldiermedic
Todd,

Are you planning on replacing it before or after the new frame is done? I would not replace an appliance until the foundation is set.

Having said that, I would go with a 10 gallon with DSI (Direct spark ignition) or get a tankless water heater as seen on the VAP.

Steve
Steve, definitely after the frame is in. This is just an "advance scout" or recon of what is up ahead. I need to do the same with each of the applicances. I'm a complete novice and appreciate the advance help. With all the help I'm getting here I'll eventually have the information I need when the time is right. What is the VAP? What is a tankless water heater?
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Old 03-27-2008, 11:25 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganglin
The measurements are a little different but the flange set up is different. If you old G10B fit - the new one will fit. The one you had is the exact same as the unit we replaced. Yes - you do pick up a little new clearance in the rear.
Gary, good. I was beginning to worry that I might need to start planning a shell adaption to replace the HWH. I was also concerned that I had tossed the old access door too soon. But, ALL IS WELL!
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Old 03-28-2008, 08:30 AM   #21
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Todd,

This thread seems to be moving right along; not sure that I have a whole lot more to offer.

PEX is the latest version of plastic pipe tubing. I think that it is what is currently being used in new travel trailers and homes. Less expensive and more flexible than copper - but some styles of fittings are a bit pricey. I used "crimp" fittings which are the cheaper way to go - but you get to buy an expensive tool to install them. (There were a few places where it was difficult to get the tool into location to use it.) There are a few threads dealin with this topic. My 75 unit has copper while the 86 had polybutylene which is "close" to the same size as PEX but required a hard to find adapter to make the transition.

One disadvantage of a 10 gallon unit: 30 plus pound heavier. I was thinking about a "tankless" unit - if I were doing an extensive rehab I probably would have gone that way. (I have become a bit compulsive about weight - the newer trailer is about 1200 lbs heavier without much more capability.)

Finally, the bypass makes it easier to winterize if you use antifreeze. I did ONCE - took forever to get the taste out of the water. I now use an air compressor to blow out the lines after letting them drain. For the last trip of the season I dump the holding tanks and open the drains and drive home with a jug of drinking water. The road action helps get all the water out and it does not take too long to blow everything down.

Good luck with the project.

Whit Nash
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Old 03-28-2008, 09:38 AM   #22
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I replaced my 6 gallon tank and found it just fine. I did the by pastt at the tank using ordinary pipe and water taps think about it a tape to shut off the water tank . I would be interested in an electrical ignition unit if any one has the info.

Rae Baker
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Old 03-28-2008, 09:59 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by rwnash
Todd,

This thread seems to be moving right along; not sure that I have a whole lot more to offer.

PEX is the latest version of plastic pipe tubing. I think that it is what is currently being used in new travel trailers and homes. Less expensive and more flexible than copper - but some styles of fittings are a bit pricey. I used "crimp" fittings which are the cheaper way to go - but you get to buy an expensive tool to install them. (There were a few places where it was difficult to get the tool into location to use it.) There are a few threads dealin with this topic. My 75 unit has copper while the 86 had polybutylene which is "close" to the same size as PEX but required a hard to find adapter to make the transition.

One disadvantage of a 10 gallon unit: 30 plus pound heavier. I was thinking about a "tankless" unit - if I were doing an extensive rehab I probably would have gone that way. (I have become a bit compulsive about weight - the newer trailer is about 1200 lbs heavier without much more capability.)

Finally, the bypass makes it easier to winterize if you use antifreeze. I did ONCE - took forever to get the taste out of the water. I now use an air compressor to blow out the lines after letting them drain. For the last trip of the season I dump the holding tanks and open the drains and drive home with a jug of drinking water. The road action helps get all the water out and it does not take too long to blow everything down.

Good luck with the project.

Whit Nash
Whit,

Based on your description it sounds as though I would want to replace all the copper with PEX. I was wondering whether to reuse the copper I removed. I ended up with a few pinches in the tubing during the process of removal. I'll look for the other threads and check at the local Lowes and H. Depot for more info on PEX.

What is a tankless water heater? Haven't heard of them. Sounds great. I agree with you about weight. I'm in the process of replacing the frame on this trailer and keeping the size/weight of the replacement steel down has been a factor. I'd like to consider the options if I can shave weight with tankless heater.

As for antifreeze I don't think I would use it but the bypass sounds as if it makes it much easier to drain the system.
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Old 03-28-2008, 04:43 PM   #24
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copper or pex

I think you will have an easy time finding opinions on copper and pex by looking in the plumbing threads, there seem to be valid viewpoints each way.

I suggest that when you are making that decision, allow yourself to factor in your comfort level in working with the two systems. In my case, I have sweated copper joints for years and had good success with it. Given that most of the plumbing joints in a trailer are hard to get to, at best, if there is a problem, I really did not want to be on the steep end of the learning curve with a material totally new to me.

This is our first trailer, and since I had to Full Monte the back end, there were already plenty of things I was doing outside my comfort zone. We live in a very small city and finding knowledgeable people in the Lowe's and HD's is nearly impossible. You may have much better resources for products and advice in your area.

PEX and copper are both good systems IF good quality materials and good workmanship are used. Get all the advice you can from experienced people in making your decision, but then also factor in what you feel more comfortable installing and won't worry about after you put everything back together.

There are plenty of folks in the forum who will suggest that you spend the time and money to do it right the first time, and I think that's wise, whichever system you choose.

To answer your other question, a tankless water heater is similar to one of those instant hot water taps you sometimes see in office kitchens. There is no storage tank, just a big burner that heats up the water as it's used. They are expensive (about $800 to $900 or so) and use a fair amount of propane. Hopefully someone will share their experience with them in the Forum.

Laird
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Old 03-28-2008, 10:04 PM   #25
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Tankless On-Demand Hot Water

Quote:
Originally Posted by maccamper
I think you will have an easy time finding opinions on copper and pex by looking in the plumbing threads, there seem to be valid viewpoints each way.

I suggest that when you are making that decision, allow yourself to factor in your comfort level in working with the two systems. In my case, I have sweated copper joints for years and had good success with it. Given that most of the plumbing joints in a trailer are hard to get to, at best, if there is a problem, I really did not want to be on the steep end of the learning curve with a material totally new to me.

This is our first trailer, and since I had to Full Monte the back end, there were already plenty of things I was doing outside my comfort zone. We live in a very small city and finding knowledgeable people in the Lowe's and HD's is nearly impossible. You may have much better resources for products and advice in your area.

PEX and copper are both good systems IF good quality materials and good workmanship are used. Get all the advice you can from experienced people in making your decision, but then also factor in what you feel more comfortable installing and won't worry about after you put everything back together.

There are plenty of folks in the forum who will suggest that you spend the time and money to do it right the first time, and I think that's wise, whichever system you choose.

To answer your other question, a tankless water heater is similar to one of those instant hot water taps you sometimes see in office kitchens. There is no storage tank, just a big burner that heats up the water as it's used. They are expensive (about $800 to $900 or so) and use a fair amount of propane. Hopefully someone will share their experience with them in the Forum.

Laird
I spent a small amount of time browsing on-line one of these on-demand tankless systems. According to one site one model has a fuel consumption of 940 gallons of hot water per LPG tank versus a tank type which uses 740 gallons of hot water per LPG tank. Fuel consumption is 2.55 lbs per hour at maximum input. ( At 2 GPM of water, 20 lbs of propane will produce over 940 gallons of hot water). The tankless version is much lighter 27.5 versus 110 pounds when full. Interesting. Is anyone here using one?
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Old 03-29-2008, 01:25 AM   #26
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I decided to save a little money and installed this one a few days ago. A pretty good deal. It was relatively easy. I reused the original fittings and it intruded a little on my toilet because I had to add a riser to the lower intake port because of the electric heater box. I like your flex attachments because it would clean up the pipe layout a bit. I would really prefer to switch the whole system to PEX. I probably have more flex tubing and pipe clamps than original copper at this point.
I did talk to a plumber at HD and he suggested the crimping, and was not that happy with the compression fittings. It would seem so much easier to replace sections using the comp fittings. Has anyone had any bad experiences with them?
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Old 03-29-2008, 09:04 AM   #27
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I decided to save a little money and installed this one a few days ago. A pretty good deal. It was relatively easy. I reused the original fittings and it intruded a little on my toilet because I had to add a riser to the lower intake port because of the electric heater box. I like your flex attachments because it would clean up the pipe layout a bit. I would really prefer to switch the whole system to PEX. I probably have more flex tubing and pipe clamps than original copper at this point.
I did talk to a plumber at HD and he suggested the crimping, and was not that happy with the compression fittings. It would seem so much easier to replace sections using the comp fittings. Has anyone had any bad experiences with them?
This looks like the same unit we were discussing earlier in the thread and has the same cut-out dimensions. I went out and measured the exterior shell cut-out dimensions that exist on my trailer for the old Bowen. They are: 16-1/2" wide, 16" high, 19-3/4" inches deep. So the new Atwood is about 2 inches deeper (rather than shorter as I had calculated in post #15)! Did you take any photos of the process?
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Old 03-30-2008, 11:41 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monocoque
I spent a small amount of time browsing on-line one of these on-demand tankless systems. According to one site one model has a fuel consumption of 940 gallons of hot water per LPG tank versus a tank type which uses 740 gallons of hot water per LPG tank. Fuel consumption is 2.55 lbs per hour at maximum input. ( At 2 GPM of water, 20 lbs of propane will produce over 940 gallons of hot water). The tankless version is much lighter 27.5 versus 110 pounds when full. Interesting. Is anyone here using one?
Send a message to Lewster, he uses one and is a wealth of information on the RV500. I am also looking at installing one in my Tradewind.
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