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Old 05-12-2013, 08:02 PM   #29
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Did you put a gage on it to see if it actually works?

Perry

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I have always used an external regulator. I hook it up first, next to the city water valve. In my mind I may be protecting my hose as well.
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Old 05-12-2013, 09:04 PM   #30
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On my 77 Argosy the water first went through a Watts type pressure regulator. Then the water went through a 50 pound blow off valve that drained to the outside with the excess pressure. After that, the water went to the inside plumbing.
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Old 05-13-2013, 02:40 AM   #31
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Ventport, was your Argosy ventport a factory thing or was it added? When I get around to fixing my plumbing proper, I may add a blow off or relief valve.

Perry
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:53 AM   #32
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Ventport, was your Argosy ventport a factory thing or was it added? When I get around to fixing my plumbing proper, I may add a blow off or relief valve.

Perry
It was factory from what I can tell. It's to the upper right of the water pressure regulator. It has a line that runs through the belly pan for the excess pressure to exhaust through.
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Old 05-13-2013, 07:55 AM   #33
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The water heater has a relief valve built in. If it (water heater) is the cause of the over pressurization. It may be the first thing to look at.
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Old 05-13-2013, 08:58 AM   #34
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So what we have learned from all this is you need an accumulator, pressure regulator, and relief valve in addition to the relief valve already on the water heater. The relief valve (RV) would take care of water heater related issues as well as failure of the incoming water pressure regulator. Most homes could use the same things. A lot of home related water flooding problems are busted pipes from poorly made appliances like water delivery systems on the newer refrigerators. I have had problems at home with ice maker tubing and connections and I have some friends that had to redo their kitchen because a water filter on the fridge busted and flooded the kitchen while they were gone. Which brings up another issue. If you are going on vacation, TURN OFF THE WATER HEATER AND THE WATER AT THE METER.

It is also not a bad idea to turn off at the breaker box any 220V appliances and anything else you know you won't be using while you are gone. Things like the stove the dryer etc.


Perry
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:21 AM   #35
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Did you put a gage on it to see if it actually works?

Perry
No, I have not put a gauge on it, but it seems to be slowing down or restricting or doing something to the water. The water seems to strain or struggle to go through it. So I don't know the PSI at the end of it, only that it is less than it would have been. Ain't never blowed nothin' up, yet. I thought regulators were designed for amcertain PSI- say 40 or 50. I don't know how a guy would know if it really works without a guage, but i don't have one. The other brand trailer we had before didn't have a built in regulator. According to this forum the Airstream does. I did not know that before. So I am using 2 regulators? I wonder if that funny looking little bypass by the water heater may be this regulator? There is 2 sets of piping that appear to come from and go to the same destination. The bottom pipe has a valve on either end, and the top piece has some type of brass fitting. Would this be a regulator and the valves be a bypass? Things that make you go hmmm...
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Old 05-14-2013, 07:12 AM   #36
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I think your extra plumbing around the water heater is a bypass the you open and then drain the water heater. Now your water will not fill the water heater and you can pump antifreeze through the pipes to winterize. Personally, I don't see anything wrong with just blowing out the pipes with water and calling it good but I am no yankee.

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Old 05-14-2013, 07:48 AM   #37
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The factory blow off /bypass valve after the regulator on my Argosy was set at 50 lbs from the sticker on the top. The water heater blow off valve says 125 lbs on it, so that would blow off as a last resort before the pipes burst.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:30 PM   #38
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I think your extra plumbing around the water heater is a bypass the you open and then drain the water heater. Now your water will not fill the water heater and you can pump antifreeze through the pipes to winterize. Personally, I don't see anything wrong with just blowing out the pipes with water and calling it good but I am no yankee.

Perry
No. There is the water heater bypass, and then there is this other section of pipe below. It is one pipe. Then a valve. Then the pipe has a t fitting. There is a straight piece of pipe at the bottom. There is a piece of pipe with a brass fitting of some type in the middle at the top. Both then come to another valve. With the valves turned one way, the water flows straight through unaffected. With the valves turned the other way the water flows through that little brass thingamajigger. Either way, the water comes from the same source and goes to the same destination, but I have a choice as to whether it goes through the little brass thing or not. Some time after I figure out how to post pictures and I am in the trailer I will take a picture. I am using the term pipe for what is probably really PEX tubing.
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Old 05-15-2013, 09:47 PM   #39
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Did you put a gage on it to see if it actually works?

Perry
I use the Camco inline regulator and installed a gauge to verify that it works. It regulates to 40 psig which isn't adjustable. Pressure drops to about 30 psig with a large demand such as filling the toilet or running the kitchen sink wide open.

My house pressure is about 80 psig. The inline regulator will set at 40 psig and won't rise even with no flow. If it ever goes bad, replacing it is extremely easy. After verifying that it worked, I decided not to re-install an on-board regulator.
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:07 AM   #40
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Do you have a model number or link to this thing?

Perry

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I use the Camco inline regulator and installed a gauge to verify that it works. It regulates to 40 psig which isn't adjustable. Pressure drops to about 30 psig with a large demand such as filling the toilet or running the kitchen sink wide open.

My house pressure is about 80 psig. The inline regulator will set at 40 psig and won't rise even with no flow. If it ever goes bad, replacing it is extremely easy. After verifying that it worked, I decided not to re-install an on-board regulator.
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Old 05-16-2013, 09:27 PM   #41
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The one I have is the brass 40055.

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Old 05-17-2013, 07:31 AM   #42
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I will have to get one of those and test it.

Perry
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