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Old 01-25-2014, 09:55 AM   #15
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Grey colored MarineTex. You can get it in a marina or hardware stores. I have also seen it in Lowes.

As J. Morgan says. it must be corrosion free and completely dry.
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Before epoxying it you might see if a piece of copper tubing or brass plug would slide in there with a tight fit. You could sweat solder a plug or another valve in.
I thought about soldering (brazing) a small cap over (or a plug inside) the petcock, but with a plastic water line attached in some unknown fashion to the blind side, I'm not sure how much heat would be too much.

I'm leaning towards trying epoxy first, but of course as you say the trick is getting a low point drain completely dry.

I'll probably open it and let it drain for several days prior; then run some fine emery cloth inside on a small dowell, blow it out, and try the MarineTex.
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Old 01-25-2014, 10:17 AM   #16
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If I can't find a small amount of MarineTex at West Marine (my only local source), I'll try Plumber's Putty. Worst case? It blows out.
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Old 01-25-2014, 11:44 AM   #17
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The fast (5min) locktite epoxy sold at lowes or Home Depot will work as good as any epoxy for this fix and better than plumbers putty. JB Weld will work fine too,

Mainly you need it clean, and sanded for some "tooth" for the glue to bite into

The other huge thing is getting enough epoxy to stay in the hole.

The locktite epoxy will come in a double syringe configuration with a "mixing wand" that will mix the two components and act as a needle of sorts that you could use to place the epoxy the hole. Perhaps an "envelope" of tape could help keep it in place too.

Tough to describe.... Sorry!!!
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Old 01-25-2014, 03:00 PM   #18
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The fast (5min) locktite epoxy sold at lowes or Home Depot will work as good as any epoxy for this fix and better than plumbers putty. JB Weld will work fine too,

Mainly you need it clean, and sanded for some "tooth" for the glue to bite into

The other huge thing is getting enough epoxy to stay in the hole.

The locktite epoxy will come in a double syringe configuration with a "mixing wand" that will mix the two components and act as a needle of sorts that you could use to place the epoxy the hole. Perhaps an "envelope" of tape could help keep it in place too.

Tough to describe.... Sorry!!!
Well, that's why I thought I'd try plumber's putty first - it's a putty, rather than a liquid, and should stay in the hole without any tape. I'm afraid that covering or plugging the hole tightly enough to retain a liquid will inhibit curing. If it blows out, I'll try the next epoxy.

If the putty or epoxy blows out, I might try gluing in a small piece of brass rod or a piece of epoxy-coated wood dowel. The golf tee idea is looking better and better
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Old 01-25-2014, 05:10 PM   #19
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I had a leak from one of those same valves. Flushing it didn't stop the drip. Looking at one in a hardware store, I saw that it closes with a metal to metal seat/seal. Thinking that this is not unlike a pipe thread seal, I opened the valve all the way, and used a Q-tip to push pipe joint compound ("pipe dope") back into the seat area. As of now it hasn't leaked in over two years of full time use... but I haven't needed to open and close it since.
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Old 01-26-2014, 10:53 AM   #20
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I had a leak from one of those same valves. Flushing it didn't stop the drip. Looking at one in a hardware store, I saw that it closes with a metal to metal seat/seal. Thinking that this is not unlike a pipe thread seal, I opened the valve all the way, and used a Q-tip to push pipe joint compound ("pipe dope") back into the seat area. As of now it hasn't leaked in over two years of full time use... but I haven't needed to open and close it since.
Great idea! I'm pretty sure that most of these brass valves have the same type of design, and it would probably be much easier to get a good seal on the seat than the whole barrel. I don't plan on opening it again either


Thanks, I'll try it first.....
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Old 01-26-2014, 11:00 AM   #21
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Great idea! I'm pretty sure that most of these brass valves have the same type of design, and it would probably be much easier to get a good seal on the seat than the whole barrel. I don't plan on opening it again either


Thanks, I'll try it first.....
If you don't plan on opening it again, then a threaded plug or cap for a permanent closure is better than any valve. And if events conspire to make you open it again someday, you can unscrew a cap or plug by slapping a wrench on it. Don't pay extra for a convenience that you don't expect to ever need.
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Old 01-26-2014, 12:12 PM   #22
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If you don't plan on opening it again, then a threaded plug or cap for a permanent closure is better than any valve. And if events conspire to make you open it again someday, you can unscrew a cap or plug by slapping a wrench on it. Don't pay extra for a convenience that you don't expect to ever need.
I'm not sure where you're suggesting that I could install either a cap or a plug on the bottom of the petcock valve. I'd rather not have to cut into the sheet metal pan under the trailer to access the whole valve, or remove a closet to get to it from above. The inner barrel of the petcock seems to be flared at the bottom to hold the wing nut and I can't remove the inner barrel. A little pipe dope or epoxy is cheap. I must be missing something here?
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Old 01-26-2014, 08:01 PM   #23
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I too could not figure out any way to cap that valve. The pipe dope was cheap, quick, reversible (it doesn't set up) and it worked!
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Old 01-26-2014, 08:33 PM   #24
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I have a low point drain that drips. I spray the threads down with WD-40 and then open and close the drain several times until it seals. This has been working for me for several years now.
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Old 01-27-2014, 02:06 PM   #25
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I have a low point drain that drips. I spray the threads down with WD-40 and then open and close the drain several times until it seals. This has been working for me for several years now.
Thanks. I'm afraid I may be past the WD-40 fix, unfortunately. Mine is leaking with enough pressure that I have to press my finger against it really hard to stop the leak. I'm going to try both pipe dope and plumbers putty.
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