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Old 01-25-2013, 08:11 AM   #1
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1978 Argosy 30
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Plumbing Schematic, yes again...

Could anyone give me some quick feedback about this attached schematic?

Working on a 78 30' Rear Bath Argosy that I've gutted and am restoring. Does this look about right to folks? Seems like a lot of one way valves, but in my (often feeble) mind they seem to make sense.

Any thoughts here? Things I've missed? Additions others would make?

Thanks!!
mark
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:12 AM   #2
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Obviously valves on the drain lines.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:48 AM   #3
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3 Changes already....

- Need a pressure regulator on the inlet for city water
- No check valve after the pump, otherwise it won't sense any pressure drop
- Then the valves at the drains as mentioned before.

Sound right? Other changes?
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Old 01-25-2013, 01:25 PM   #4
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The check valve between the water tank and pump is not necessary. The pump will have a built-in check valve to prevent water from flowing back into the tank while hooked up to city water.

Many city water inlets have a built-in check valve, so if that's the case on yours, no need for a separate one on that line. But check your inlet to see if it has a built-in one or not.

Why the check valves on either side of the water heater? Not necessary in my opinion, and I don't have any there on my trailer. If you eliminate them, then you only need one low point drain on the hot water side and one on the cold water side. So, you could eliminate one low point drain.

My 2 cents.

Chris
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Old 01-26-2013, 08:48 AM   #5
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I have seen some shutoffs on either side of a hot water heater. Is this necessary? What purpose would these serve? Aid in draining the system or isolating the HWH??

thanks,
mark
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:11 AM   #6
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I have seen some shutoffs on either side of a hot water heater. Is this necessary? What purpose would these serve? Aid in draining the system or isolating the HWH??

thanks,
mark
Here's a pic of setup on my trailer. CW enters lower left, HW exits upper left. Low point drain valve is seen bottom right. The crossover valve allows for potable antifreeze to be pumped into system, bypassing the drained HWH. If you plan to use antifreeze then consider a valve on the suction side of the pump so that you can switch from the FW tank to a dip tube inserted into the gallon jug of antifreeze.
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:13 AM   #7
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The valves around the water heater are isolate to the tank from system.

It aids in winterizing. It takes three valves: One at cold water inlet, one at the hot water outlet, and one in the middle of a cross connection between the two.


This allows the the antifreeze (or air in the case of those of us oy choose to blow out the plumbing in the winter) to bypass the tank and flow directly from the cold water supply to the hot water plumbing.

One simply drains the water heater, so no need to use up six extra gallons of antifreeze.

JD
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Old 01-26-2013, 11:07 AM   #8
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If you install an on demand water heater, it holds so little water/antifreeze I wouldn't worry too much about bypass valves.

Chris
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Old 01-26-2013, 11:20 AM   #9
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Would I still want a cross connector though if my plan was to blow out the lines?

I'm leaning towards that direction vs. the antifreeze route.

Thx, helpful info!
mark

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If you install an on demand water heater, it holds so little water/antifreeze I wouldn't worry too much about bypass valves.

Chris
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Old 01-26-2013, 11:32 AM   #10
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Would I still want a cross connector though if my plan was to blow out the lines?

I'm leaning towards that direction vs. the antifreeze route.

Thx, helpful info!
mark
Ok, now that's one of those topics where you'll get many opposing opinions!

I personally go the antifreeze route, as the one year I blew my lines and did not add antifreeze, I replaced the water pump in the spring because the seals had dried out. However, lots of other folks do blow their lines and do not use antifreeze, and do not have any problems.

Anyway, to answer your question, if you are going to blow the lines faithfully every year, and not use antifreeze, you do not need the water heater bypass valves.

Actually even if you use antifreeze, you do not need the bypass valves. It’ll just take more antifreeze to winterize your trailer.

Chris
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