Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-27-2011, 07:29 AM   #1
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,709
Do I have Pex tubing?

Ok - when we travel, I try to keep myself prepared to deal with a variety of emergency repairs. It seems so far what we encounter most often are minor electrical problems, so I carry multimeter, wire, soldering iron, etc etc.

I also carry a good assortment of hand tools, elec drill, pop rivet stuff zip ties, and of course duct tape!

One area though in which I feel I am not well prepared relates to plumbing issues.

I don't really know anything about the type of plumbing used in the trailer.

My trailer is a 2005 Classic. All the water piping seems to be white plastic tube fastened with crimp rings.

Would this likely be the brand name I have heard of called "Pex?" If so, I will research the subject and think about buying a supply of crimp rings, some spare tube, the tool needed to apply the crimp rings etc. to add to my
"just in case" kit!

Can anyone confirm what a 2005 trailer would have?

Thanks ....... Brian
__________________

__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 09:08 AM   #2
Rivet Master
 
Phrunes's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Oakley , California
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,197
Sounds like PEX to me. It should be stamped in black on the lines just to double check.
__________________

__________________
Phrunes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 09:32 AM   #3
Rivet Master
 
TG Twinkie's Avatar
 
1974 Argosy 26
Morrill , Nebraska
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5,140
Images: 2
Blog Entries: 5
Pex

The are a lot of fittings available today that don't require the crimp rings. A little research will lead you to a simpler system of fittings and no special tools required.
__________________
Knowledge: "A gift to be shared. A treasure to receive."
TG Twinkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 10:05 AM   #4
Rivet Master
 
tphan's Avatar
 
1972 27' Overlander
Longmont , Colorado
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 951
Pex is very durable stuff, very resistant to splitting from freezing, so the rather expensive crimping tool may be a tool that you never use. They can also be rented, I understand.
__________________
tphan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 10:17 AM   #5
Rivet Master
 
utee94's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Austin , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post

My trailer is a 2005 Classic. All the water piping seems to be white plastic tube fastened with crimp rings.

Would this likely be the brand name I have heard of called "Pex?" If so, I will research the subject and think about buying a supply of crimp rings, some spare tube, the tool needed to apply the crimp rings etc. to add to my
"just in case" kit!

Can anyone confirm what a 2005 trailer would have?

Thanks ....... Brian
Yup, sounds like you have PEX. Just FYI, it's not a brand name, it's a description of the material structure of the tubing, short for "polyethelene cross-linked." There are several brands of PEX tubing, and even more various brands and styles of fittings.

The crimped fittings are the least expensive, but require a fairly expensive tool, which is also somewhat bulky and difficult to get into and operate in some of the tighter places in your trailer.

Another style of fitting is the "push" fitting. Brands include Sharkbite that you can find at the orange box, another one at the blue box, and numerous others. They're more expensive, but easier to use especially in tight places.

Since you really want to use this as part of a repair kit (which is a great idea), a good solution would be to buy a length or two of the tubing, a quality tube-cutter (the ends need to be straight, clean, and de-burred for the push fittings to work), and a handful of the most common push-type fittings. Maybe a couple of unions, a tee, and a 90-degree elbow or two.

That should be enough to satisfy any emergency repairs you might need to perform on the road.

Good luck!
-Marcus
utee94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 11:11 AM   #6
Rivet Master
 
murreywalker's Avatar
 
2013 25' FB Flying Cloud
2011 23' FB Flying Cloud
Branson , Missouri
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 734
Images: 1
The last trailer I had was a 17' Casita.

PEX was used exclusively. AND you could get to any area (for repair) with ease.

I'm not familiar with the AS plumbing, but do know that it's more difficult to get to.

Does anyone know of a manual (or source) that diagrams the location of the plumbing?
__________________
murreywalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 11:37 AM   #7
More than one rivet loose
 
thecatsandi's Avatar

 
Currently Looking...
Keymar , Maryland
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,754
Given the year, you have "PEX" Buy some "Shark bite" connectors if you want some repair materials.
__________________
Michelle TAC MT-0
Sarah, Snowball

Looking for a 1962 Flying Cloud

thecatsandi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 12:32 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by utee94 View Post
Yup, sounds like you have PEX. Just FYI, it's not a brand name, it's a description of the material structure of the tubing, short for "polyethelene cross-linked." There are several brands of PEX tubing, and even more various brands and styles of fittings.

The crimped fittings are the least expensive, but require a fairly expensive tool, which is also somewhat bulky and difficult to get into and operate in some of the tighter places in your trailer.

Another style of fitting is the "push" fitting. Brands include Sharkbite that you can find at the orange box, another one at the blue box, and numerous others. They're more expensive, but easier to use especially in tight places.

Since you really want to use this as part of a repair kit (which is a great idea), a good solution would be to buy a length or two of the tubing, a quality tube-cutter (the ends need to be straight, clean, and de-burred for the push fittings to work), and a handful of the most common push-type fittings. Maybe a couple of unions, a tee, and a 90-degree elbow or two.

That should be enough to satisfy any emergency repairs you might need to perform on the road.

Good luck!
-Marcus

Thanks for that info. What made me start thinking about this is that we were camping with our daughter and family last weekend. They had an almost new SOB trailer, and when they tried to turn the bypass valves the correct way for summer operation, one valve was broken. Tey are just simple ball valves and I first thought that maybe the plastic handle was broken, but when we removed it and tried to turn the valve shaft with pliers, the shaft was just loose and teh ball wasn't turning - nothing we could do other than share our hot water with him for the weekend!

His valves - and mine too in the AS are secured with these similar fittings.

If we had a new valve it would have been easy enough to cut the old clamp rings off with a dremel (which I carry) but without the right tool would have been pretty tough to install a replacement valve - assuming we could have found one!

Incidentally, from what I have been reading, there are two type of securement rings, crimp rings and cinch rings that can be used with Pex, and presumeably the tools needed are different.

From pictures that I see, I think our AS uses cinch rings - they look like steel, (stainless?) I gather crimp rings are copper.


Brian
__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 12:55 PM   #9
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
It would take quite an assortment of parts to be prepared for such repairs.

I have never seen sharkbite-style fittings on valves so the "sharkbite" way of doing things would then be to have a replacement valve with threads and put two of the thread-to-PEX sharkbite adapters on there. Not idea, might not fit, heavy.

I'm not sure this is an area where it makes sense to carry spares since the components most likely to fail are all ones specific to a particular application -- valves, faucets, pumps, adapters, that kind of thing. If you were on a bluewater voyage you might have to carry one of each, or at least some couplers, plugs, and caps so you could disconnect and isolate the failed part.
__________________
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 02:12 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
It would take quite an assortment of parts to be prepared for such repairs.

I have never seen sharkbite-style fittings on valves so the "sharkbite" way of doing things would then be to have a replacement valve with threads and put two of the thread-to-PEX sharkbite adapters on there. Not idea, might not fit, heavy.

I'm not sure this is an area where it makes sense to carry spares since the components most likely to fail are all ones specific to a particular application -- valves, faucets, pumps, adapters, that kind of thing. If you were on a bluewater voyage you might have to carry one of each, or at least some couplers, plugs, and caps so you could disconnect and isolate the failed part.
Yes, I guess that makes sense - I still wouldn't mind at least being prepared - if not actually buying the tools at this time to know how to deal with this type of plumbing if I need to make a repair when I have the trailer at home.

Unless it something I feel I should just not attempt, I always prefer to have a go at fixing things myself. Apart from the $ savings (sometimes negated if specialized tools are needed for one time use), I think the more I do myself, the more I know about the trailer and the better I may be able to handle emergency problems on the road.

Brian.
__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 02:55 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
2010 27' FB Classic
N/A , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,717
I don't have the specific links, but once I stumbled across a Utube video that addressed the PEX types of fittings and how to use the tools, etc. I probably should have saved it, and now can't seem to find anything like it on Utube.
Maybe someone with Utube savvy can find and post some links for us to watch. I'd like to see more on the subject.
__________________
Bluto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 04:17 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
utee94's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Austin , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,636
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
It would take quite an assortment of parts to be prepared for such repairs.

I have never seen sharkbite-style fittings on valves so the "sharkbite" way of doing things would then be to have a replacement valve with threads and put two of the thread-to-PEX sharkbite adapters on there. Not idea, might not fit, heavy.

I'm not sure this is an area where it makes sense to carry spares since the components most likely to fail are all ones specific to a particular application -- valves, faucets, pumps, adapters, that kind of thing. If you were on a bluewater voyage you might have to carry one of each, or at least some couplers, plugs, and caps so you could disconnect and isolate the failed part.
With all due respect, I disagree. You could easily carry a few parts that would help you. That's exactly what I do. And they do make PEX valves that don't require going to threaded connectors. Not necessarily sharkbite, but Flairit makes them.

Flair-It Store - Flair-It Valves



Flair-its aren't quite as easy to install as Sharbite, but they're smaller and IMO more reliable. They're best used with a heat gun to get the tubing over the stem on the fitting, but in a pinch you can force them manually (or just leave your tubing in the Texas sun for 10 minutes ).

wingeezer:

Here's my advice, take it or leave it.

1) Don't worry about the crimp style fittings unless you're replumbing a whole treailer
2) Get a good set of tube cutters
3) Get a couple lengths of PEX tubing
4) Get the following push or Flair-it fittings: 2 unions, 2 elbows, 2 tees, 1 or 2 valves (same operational valves as you find in your trailer)

Put them all in a kit with your tools or supplies, and have the peace of mind of knowing you can help yourself, or your family, in case of plumbing emegency.

Just a couple of months ago, a buddy of mine busted a fitting on his toilet supply line in his SOB when we were out camping together. He would have gone the whole weekend without facilities (and probably needing to use mine!) but instead I was able to get in there and replace his old with new. Felt pretty darn good I must say.

Good luck!
-Marcus
utee94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 04:32 PM   #13
Moderator
 
DKB_SATX's Avatar

 
2017 26' Flying Cloud
1976 Argosy 28
Alamo Heights , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6,401
Images: 1
Blog Entries: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluto View Post
I don't have the specific links, but once I stumbled across a Utube video that addressed the PEX types of fittings and how to use the tools, etc. I probably should have saved it, and now can't seem to find anything like it on Utube.
Maybe someone with Utube savvy can find and post some links for us to watch. I'd like to see more on the subject.
Here are all sorts of youtube videos on the topic from pexsupply.com.
__________________
David

Zero Gravitas 2017 Flying Cloud 26U | Il Progetto 1976 Argosy 28 Center Bath | WBCCI# 15566

He has all of the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire. Sir Winston Churchill
DKB_SATX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 04:34 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by utee94 View Post
With all due respect, I disagree. You could easily carry a few parts that would help you. That's exactly what I do. And they do make PEX valves that don't require going to threaded connectors. Not necessarily sharkbite, but Flairit makes them.

Flair-It Store - Flair-It Valves



Flair-its aren't quite as easy to install as Sharbite, but they're smaller and IMO more reliable. They're best used with a heat gun to get the tubing over the stem on the fitting, but in a pinch you can force them manually (or just leave your tubing in the Texas sun for 10 minutes ).

wingeezer:

Here's my advice, take it or leave it.

1) Don't worry about the crimp style fittings unless you're replumbing a whole treailer
2) Get a good set of tube cutters
3) Get a couple lengths of PEX tubing
4) Get the following push or Flair-it fittings: 2 unions, 2 elbows, 2 tees, 1 or 2 valves (same operational valves as you find in your trailer)

Put them all in a kit with your tools or supplies, and have the peace of mind of knowing you can help yourself, or your family, in case of plumbing emegency.

Just a couple of months ago, a buddy of mine busted a fitting on his toilet supply line in his SOB when we were out camping together. He would have gone the whole weekend without facilities (and probably needing to use mine!) but instead I was able to get in there and replace his old with new. Felt pretty darn good I must say.

Good luck!
-Marcus
Thanks for the suggestions. I've already learned quite a bit here. I think Ill take a look around Home Depot, Lowes, etc to see what they carry - or maybe some of these items like Sharkbite, Flairit are just found in RV or marine outlets?

I take it that they all work with Pex tubing and don't need special tubing of their own manufacture.

That is one of the things I'm wrestling with a bit here, ie not knowing how universal all this stuff is or if it is all part of its own system, of parts and tubing.

Brian
__________________

__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PEX Replacement CAN NOT BE DONE...'75 Tradewind... onemanclan Plumbing - Systems & Fixtures 40 04-16-2011 09:50 PM
'73 Argosy 24ft Plumbing Schematic?? suz272000 All Argosy Trailers 11 04-04-2011 11:54 AM
PEX Diverter?? wworx Fresh Water Systems 6 02-15-2011 02:28 PM
Pex for fresh tank outlet DanielB Fresh Water Systems 12 01-23-2011 05:10 PM
Installing Propane light lucymcdog LP Gas, Piping, Tanks & Regulators 69 01-23-2011 12:12 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.