Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-29-2007, 05:41 PM   #1
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
When to change grades of polish

I ordered a sampling of grades of nuvite to try out on the Trade Wind and played around some today. I guess this is obvious to everyone else, but not to me: when do you know when it is time to go from a heavier grit to a finer one? Will the heavy grit stop turning black when applied?

Also, I recall reading 400 rpm is the idea speed for the grinder, does anyone know which setting that is on the harbor freight grinder? Thanks
__________________

__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 05:43 PM   #2
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gen Disarray

Also, I recall reading 400 rpm is the idea speed for the grinder, does anyone know which setting that is on the harbor freight grinder? Thanks
The cheap single speed ones range from 1200-1700RPM.
__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 05:51 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
Fyrzowt's Avatar
 
2000 25' Safari
West of Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6,697
Images: 8
I used a H/F grinder/polisher on mine, I guessed on the speed and kept it low about the II setting. I honestly don't know what the speed was but it seemed to work fine - fast enough to be effective without heating up the skin.

I also changed grades by the seat of my pants. When it seemed like the C grade was no longer doing any good (visually) I went to a fine grade. I don't know that there is a rule of thumb.
As far as the black color, it seems as though as long as you keep moving metal (using polish) you will get black residue.
That was my experience.
Dave
__________________
Fyrzowt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 06:39 PM   #4
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fyrzowt
I also changed grades by the seat of my pants. When it seemed like the C grade was no longer doing any good (visually)
Dave
Can you describe what sort of visual cues you used in determining that the C grade wasnt doing any good?
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 06:49 PM   #5
Rivet Master
 
InsideOut's Avatar

 
1956 22' Safari
Vintage Kin Owner
Conifer/Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 11,793
Images: 108
You kinda gotta just jump in and do it. When it stops making a difference, it's done...time to move on. When you first start polishing you see a major change from the oxidized aluminum starting to take on a shine. After a first pass or two or sometimes three it's cloudy and uneven. At first it's mostly cloudy with just patches of shine, then shine with patches of cloudiness...when all the cloudiness goes away and the shine is even, then you move onto the finer polish to work out the swirls and finalize the process with 'S' & the cyclo.

Depending on the condition & scratches you are trying to get out on your trailer, you may have to go over some areas 8 or 10 times before moving on the to finer grades. After doing it awhile, you get the hang of it...

Shari
__________________
Vintage Airstream Club - Past President 2007/2008
WBCCI #1824 - DenCO Unit Past President (2005)
AIR #30 - Join Date: 2-25-2002

RMVAC | WBCCI DenCO Unit | Sisters on the Fly | Tin Can Tourists
BIRDY - our 1956 Safari | 1964 Serro Scotty
InsideOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 06:50 PM   #6
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 261
Images: 14
Use of the slowest setting on the compounder and minimal polish works best. Too much speed or polish causes slippage and less effective oxidation removal.

I recommend starting with a mid grade (C or F7). If you get bright clean metal with that, then its working. Use the compounder until the grayish/brownish haze is gone. This is best seen in strong light like late afternoon sun. If you don't get bright metal in a few passes drop down to a more agressive grit polish. But the more aggressive grit will make more deeper scratches.

Compounding introduces swirly scratches into the AL. Cyclo polishing a la Shirley removes or smooths the scratchs.
__________________
bjond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 06:55 PM   #7
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideOut
You kinda gotta just jump in and do it. When it stops making a difference, it's done...time to move on. When you first start polishing you see a major change from the oxidized aluminum starting to take on a shine. After a first pass or two or sometimes three it's cloudy and uneven. At first it's mostly cloudy with just patches of shine, then shine with patches of cloudiness...when all the cloudiness goes away and the shine is even, then you move onto the finer polish to work out the swirls and finalize the process with 'S' & the cyclo.

Depending on the condition & scratches you are trying to get out on your trailer, you may have to go over some areas 8 or 10 times before moving on the to finer grades. After doing it awhile, you get the hang of it...

Shari
That is exactly what I needed to know. I figured it was better to ask than to waste alot of time doing it wrong when a simple question would get me on track.
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 06:57 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Fyrzowt's Avatar
 
2000 25' Safari
West of Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6,697
Images: 8
Shari and Herb describe it pretty well. If you haven't already, take a look at Home. They describe the step by step procedure. There is also a certain amount of "getting the feel of it" in my opinion.
Good luck,
Dave
__________________
Fyrzowt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 07:31 PM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
r&kweber's Avatar
 
1959 22' Flying Cloud
Currently Looking...
Seattle , Washington
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 172
Images: 3
Regarding the Harbor Freight compounder, I used II to spread the polishing compound and III to do the polishing. I noticed that when I switched from F7 to C, I didn't need a full III to get the RPM I wanted. It really is a thing of feel, and I am a total rookie at this.

There were only a few areas where I applied the F7 twice, just experimenting really. Maybe I will approach this with more skill next year, but my goal this time around was to just to remove 20 years of corrosion.

Ryan.
__________________
r&kweber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2007, 08:04 PM   #10
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by r&kweber
.....my goal this time around was to just to remove 20 years of corrosion.

Ryan.
I am debating between the one pannel at a time approach and the do the entire trailer at one level of polish then start over with finer grit...
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2007, 02:14 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
sequoiacoast's Avatar
 
1968 24' Tradewind
Eureka , California
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 694
Images: 4
Quick question:

Do you continue with the coarser grade until all worm trails are gone? I'm thinking I have to keep at it with the coarse until it's only mild swirls left... but????????
__________________
Tanya

"If you want something done right, do it yourself!"
sequoiacoast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2007, 02:19 PM   #12
Rivet Master
 
InsideOut's Avatar

 
1956 22' Safari
Vintage Kin Owner
Conifer/Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 11,793
Images: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by sequoiacoast
Quick question:

Do you continue with the coarser grade until all worm trails are gone? I'm thinking I have to keep at it with the coarse until it's only mild swirls left... but????????
Yep...you need to get those out with the coarser polishes, if not they will still be there, just shiny.

Shari
__________________
Vintage Airstream Club - Past President 2007/2008
WBCCI #1824 - DenCO Unit Past President (2005)
AIR #30 - Join Date: 2-25-2002

RMVAC | WBCCI DenCO Unit | Sisters on the Fly | Tin Can Tourists
BIRDY - our 1956 Safari | 1964 Serro Scotty
InsideOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 12:35 PM   #13
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Something I have learned, and something I need to know

I have been out polishing some, and I have learned that as big of an improvement that any polishing creates, you can never get it shiny enough. .

My question at the moment is, will a fresh application of mid grade compound always result in more black residue, or is it the case that when it is time to change to a finer grit that it will stop producing the residue?

Oh yeah, I am using the lowest setting for the harbor freight grinder, does that sound about right? And how dirty can you let the buffer head get between cleaning? In my dramatic lack of foresight I only ordered one.......
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2007, 01:00 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
Fyrzowt's Avatar
 
2000 25' Safari
West of Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6,697
Images: 8
Rodney,
As you polish you'll notice that the pad gets a shiney "Mat" to it. Take an old screwdriver or similar object and with the polisher running, scrape the pad until it fluffs the pad up a bit. Just make sure that you point the screwdriver in the right direction so it drags instead of jabbing the point into the pad. I did my whole trailer one time around without doing a real cleaning on the pad. I ordered an extra, but haven't used it yet.
Dave
__________________

__________________
Fyrzowt is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best Polish to restore Airstream ?? bgow 1969 Overlander 2 07-30-2009 12:04 PM
Old polishers take note Bradjun1 Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 3 06-08-2005 05:06 AM
Vulken and Polish or Polish then Vulkem? rookie Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 5 07-23-2002 08:15 AM
Partial Floor change winner Floor Finishes 12 07-22-2002 07:08 AM
Grades of vinyl... Andy R Floor Finishes 2 05-31-2002 12:47 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.