Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-01-2006, 03:33 PM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
1979 31' Sovereign
Baton Rouge , Louisiana
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 72
Images: 42
Trying Gord's Polish this afternoon! Will follow up!

Guys and Gals,

I just got my Gords' aluminum polish in today and I will be trying it out this evening. I have part of my A/S done with Nuvite F7 and I will be doing a section next to it with Gords. I am taking pics for comparison and "posterity" so I'll try to post them along with my evaluation of the Gords' polish. Keep in touch!!!
-Don
__________________

__________________
cobra93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2006, 02:32 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
2002 19' Bambi
Lafayette , California
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 708
More on Gord's Polish

Our 2002 19' Bambi is certainly not in need of polishing yet, but that 50-year-old aluminum rowboat my dad built is providing a real test of Gord's Polish. The boat has never had any paint or coating on the outside and it has never been polished. It has also never been handled with care.

I can only say that Gord's is amazing. When applied as directed using 0000 steel wool, it removes oxidation and leaves a terrific polish without that black tinge buffing compounds sometimes leave. Of course, the boat's deep scratches and corrosion pits are not removed, but all the high edges around those things are like mirrors. Would I try it on the Bambi when the time comes? I hope I will be "gone" by that time, but, if not and if Gord's is still in business, I would surely give Gord's Polish a try.
__________________

__________________
Tim A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2006, 05:48 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
InsideOut's Avatar

 
1956 22' Safari
Vintage Kin Owner
Conifer/Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 11,793
Images: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim A.
When applied as directed using 0000 steel wool, it removes oxidation and leaves a terrific polish without that black tinge buffing compounds sometimes leave.
YIKES!!! I sure wouldn't use steel wool to polish my aluminum trailer! Miniscule steel particles would imbed themselves in the aluminum, rust and stain. You can see a similar effect on some trailers where steel rivets (or screws) have replaced aluminum ones and they "drip" over time, leaving the tell-tale brown stains.

Just my two-cents ~

Shari
__________________
Vintage Airstream Club - Past President 2007/2008
WBCCI #1824 - DenCO Unit Past President (2005)
AIR #30 - Join Date: 2-25-2002

RMVAC | WBCCI DenCO Unit | Sisters on the Fly | Tin Can Tourists
BIRDY - our 1956 Safari | 1964 Serro Scotty
InsideOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2006, 09:44 PM   #4
Rivet Master
 
2002 19' Bambi
Lafayette , California
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 708
Gord's Polish and 0000 Steel Wool

InsideOut questioned using steel wool with Gord's Polish. Please note that I said, "When applied as directed..." Following the directions means that no steel particles are left on the aluminum. Hence no resulting rust. Of course, you do have to read the directions!

The polish can also be applied with only a cloth, but that is the hard way to remove oxidation.
__________________
Tim A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2006, 11:33 PM   #5
Rivet Master
 
InsideOut's Avatar

 
1956 22' Safari
Vintage Kin Owner
Conifer/Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 11,793
Images: 108
Not sure I'm buying that the Gord's Polish (or any other) prevents the steel particles from being left behind, even if "the directions" say so...steel & aluminum do not mix, at least on my trailer!

Shari
__________________
Vintage Airstream Club - Past President 2007/2008
WBCCI #1824 - DenCO Unit Past President (2005)
AIR #30 - Join Date: 2-25-2002

RMVAC | WBCCI DenCO Unit | Sisters on the Fly | Tin Can Tourists
BIRDY - our 1956 Safari | 1964 Serro Scotty
InsideOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2006, 11:59 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
Hello Tim A,

I think on a heavily oxidized trailer using the polish I would agree you would need the 0000 steel wool to cut the oxidation ,as you would be there forever without it .that being said ,there will be particles of steel wool that are tiny that can get in the aluminum and They will be absolutely micro in size .What do the directions say that would or could if possible keep that from occuring ?
__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2006, 08:17 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
Ken J's Avatar
 
1956 22' Flying Cloud
Durango , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: 1975 25' Tradewind
Posts: 3,363
Images: 14
Here we go again - Since there are a number of new folks hearing this for the first time - I suggest that anyone who is thinking about polishing go back into the archives and see what those of us who have had trailers and polished trailers for a long time have to say about all of this. I think you will find that none of us are using steel wool. In fact if you listen to the most recent VAP you will hear why you should not use steel wool from someone who its been said "has the shinest trailer in the world"

Not trying to start a war here, just trying to help someone who is thinking about polishing their trailer from going down the wrong road.

Ken J.
__________________
1956 Flying Cloud
Founder :
Four Corners Unit
Albuquerque National Balloon Fiesta
Rally
Vintage Trailer Academy - Formerly the original
restoration rally
Ken J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2006, 09:02 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 1,482
Images: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken J
... I think you will find that none of us are using steel wool. In fact if you listen to the most recent VAP you will hear why you should not use steel wool from someone who its been said "has the shinest trailer in the world"
Ken J.
There apparently is such a thing as aluminum wool, but I am not aware of anywhere to purchase it in retail quantities.

Mark
__________________
'85 Sovereign, 25'
j54mark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2006, 09:11 AM   #9
Rivet Master
 
Melody Ranch's Avatar
 
1956 22' Flying Cloud
1953 32' Liner
1955 22' Safari
Valley View , Texas
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3,960
Images: 78
Send a message via Skype™ to Melody Ranch
Aluminum wool

I can't believe ANY polish manufacturer recommends steel wool on aluminum.
I have used aluminum wool on aircraft for years....especially great with those tough patches of stripper resistant poly paints. Aircraft paint suppliers have this on hand along with aluminum tape.
__________________
Melody Ranch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2006, 09:14 AM   #10
Rivet Master
 
Ken J's Avatar
 
1956 22' Flying Cloud
Durango , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: 1975 25' Tradewind
Posts: 3,363
Images: 14
I would not use any kind of metal wool - I do use pure wool on my polisher - I've polished and have seen polish some really bad trailers with great results using polish designed for this purpose - the first pass should be as least agressive as possible - its easy to get more agressive with polish than it is to get less agressive. Scratches can be a bear to polish out.

Ken J.
__________________
1956 Flying Cloud
Founder :
Four Corners Unit
Albuquerque National Balloon Fiesta
Rally
Vintage Trailer Academy - Formerly the original
restoration rally
Ken J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2006, 10:09 AM   #11
3 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken J
I would not use any kind of metal wool - I do use pure wool on my polisher - I've polished and have seen polish some really bad trailers with great results using polish designed for this purpose - the first pass should be as least agressive as possible - its easy to get more agressive with polish than it is to get less agressive. Scratches can be a bear to polish out.

Ken J.

I fully agree with Ken J on this- steel wool actually embeds particles of iron on the skin and you'll see rust after it gets exposed to moisture.

I also agree 100% that one should use the least aggressive method and polish as possible- its why large professional aircraft polishers never use a coarse compound and rotating buffing wheel like the first step that Nuvite peddles. Adding a coarse grit to a high speed buffer is suicide on the skin, and requires more work to correct and repolish than the actual polishing job should take.

Wet sanding in one motion is a good way to get a bad skin ready for lighter polish than the system of grinding swirl marks in- and its far more cost effective.
__________________
millionairstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 12:08 AM   #12
3 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 117
It makes sense-

That grinding on aluminum, whether using a coarse grit paper, a Scotch brite pad, or abrasive compounds using a rotating wheel are a recipe for disaster, or at the least the need to perform LOTS of work to correct the damage.

The aircraft industry uses Airmark and Spec polishing tools for a reason- no damage and no swirling.

Aluminum restoration on a deeper basis should be done using wet r dry sand paper, and in horizontal strokes to avoid the damaging and difficult to remove circular swirls.

But this is old news.
__________________
millionairstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 11:23 PM   #13
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
to all of you ,

I would myself never use any scraping material ,steel wool or even sandpaper on any aluminum trailer ,let alone my 60 tradewind .i don't know the condition
of tim A s trailer ,and am really responding to his comments about proper directions etc he says dictate safe? usage of said steel wool 0000 .If the trailer was heavily oxidized ,where you would need to get somewhat agressive ,the nuvite compounds are the choice and follow on up to the finish .I totally concur on the embedded particles ,as they would grab into the softer aluminum ,so on and so forth .I am always concerned that with agressive methods (never use scotchbrite by the way ) the thin alclad layer will be removed ,thats a definate concern of mine .Any sanding in any direction (although I understand the idea ) causes scratching ,still has to be compounded out . any way all things we already know.

Scott
__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 11:26 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
OH by the way ,Ken J is correct ,and the coarse nuvite is really rough ,but these older airstream skins are sometimes in bad shape.I think I would use a milder grade and work at it longer ,less inflicted damage.

Scott
__________________

__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Best Polish to restore Airstream ?? bgow 1969 Overlander 2 07-30-2009 12:04 PM
Old polishers take note Bradjun1 Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 3 06-08-2005 05:06 AM
meguiars polish david h Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 3 01-11-2003 01:42 PM
polish a brushed trailer? john hd Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 6 08-25-2002 11:03 PM
Vulken and Polish or Polish then Vulkem? rookie Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 5 07-23-2002 08:15 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.