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Old 04-23-2006, 07:46 AM   #1
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1963 24' Tradewind
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How much polish do I need?

I have a 24' 1963 tradewind that is pretty weathered and am getting ready for my first shot at polising. Read the guide on Vintage Trailer Supply and I believe I need the following:
  • Nuvite Polish: F7 - Coarse
  • Nuvite Polish: C - Medium
  • Nuvite Polish: S - Very Fine
They come in 1 lb, 1/2 lb and 1/4 lb. How much of each should I buy?? Does this stuff last for a long time?Also - I need to buy a Dewalt 849 - I see them on Amazon for $172 (they do not sell them at Vintage Trailer Supply). Anybody got a better place to buy one?

Lastly - will this kit on Amazon handle my pad needs for the job?

Much thanks!

-Sig
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Old 04-23-2006, 09:38 AM   #2
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hard question. I wound up using more "C medium" than the other two, but when you say "pretty weathered" you may use quite a bit of F7. I don't think you can go wrong buying the 1/2 lb containers, at least the first round. They do last a long time if you're careful not to leaving them sitting in the sun all day while you're polishing.

For me, I wouldn't get that polishing kit. First, I'd be reluctant to get a kit where the polishing mit itself had a grit rating--I'd rely 100% on the Nuvite. Second, you will be surprised how much work you will put into polishing. I doubt that foam pads will last 1/10th into your job.

For my first pass, I use stiff polishing wheels made out of layers of cloth on a rotary polisher--you can get three stiffness levels at truck stops (I get mine at Travel America). I use the medium stiff wheel and the softer one (they are yellow and white) with the F7. Once I get the deep corrosion out, I switch to "C medium" and a wool bonnet. I have 6 wool bonnets from Nuvite. I generally use three a day,then wash them and let them dry the next day while I'm using the other three. I think you'll find this combination of wheels and bonnets will cost a little less than the $70 kit--plus you'll have control over your grit.

You can see me here working on the corrosion along the window frames. Don't forget your safety gear--you can see my earplugs, but I have definitely added goggles since I did this early effort.


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When I get down to using the "S very fine", I switch to the dual orbital polisher and the sweatshirt material, per the Nuvite recommendation. I've found I can get the material locally at a fabric outlet.
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Old 04-23-2006, 09:42 AM   #3
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I got my Dewalt at harbour freight

I would start with F7 - use VERY sparingly - like m&m size dots - after F7 you may be satisified enough to to directly to S - at least thats what I found.

The polish keeps for a long time

Ken J.
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Old 04-23-2006, 11:13 AM   #4
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I'd say~

Quote:
Originally Posted by sigv
I have a 24' 1963 tradewind that is pretty weathered and am getting ready for my first shot at polising. Read the guide on Vintage Trailer Supply and I believe I need the following:
  • Nuvite Polish: F7 - Coarse
  • Nuvite Polish: C - Medium
  • Nuvite Polish: S - Very Fine
They come in 1 lb, 1/2 lb and 1/4 lb. How much of each should I buy?? Does this stuff last for a long time?Also - I need to buy a Dewalt 849 - I see them on Amazon for $172 (they do not sell them at Vintage Trailer Supply). Anybody got a better place to buy one?
Lastly - will this kit on Amazon handle my pad needs for the job?
Much thanks!

-Sig
Sig,
I looked at your kit..
My recommendation would be to stay away from that pad kit.
For the pads, you really want the 3M wool (real) pads. You're gonna need around 6 to 8 pads. These will always be in one state of bring washed or in use..You need enough pads to keep working at the job. The 3M will last and, do the job~You can always use them again in the future~!
The polishing..
Buy a pound of each..Reason, you'll have it on hand and, once again..you'll find use for it in the future..You might want to consider adding the G Nuvite as well to your list..
Remember, once you start polishing, you're going to be doing touch-up in the future. For the tool, I know that Dewalt is nice but, you can get your tool at Sears that will work just as well..Plus, it's cheaper.`
Just based on my own experiences..
Good luck~!
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Old 04-23-2006, 11:42 AM   #5
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Where did you get the 3M pads? I bought 3 pads & a new buffer/polisher from Sears that came with a pad. One already has a hole in the side & the one that came with the tool is really loose & spins (or doesn't) when any pressure is put on it.

Becky
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Old 04-23-2006, 04:58 PM   #6
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I agree with the wool pads - they do last a long time and are re-usable - they also make them in different grades - course, medium and finish.....

Ken J.
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Old 04-23-2006, 06:16 PM   #7
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A little note about the polishers:
I started with a snap-on variable speed polisher first. It was an older machine, made by DeWalt. The speed controlling switch gave out, so I had to send it in to get repaired. In the meantime, I used a DeWalt polisher with electronic speed regulkation, which keeps the speed of the machine at a steady 1000 or so rpm, regardless of how hard you "dig in". The second machine is far superior in my opinion. The electronic speed control makes the compounding very predictable and low effort. I won't go back top the snap-on polisher, now that I got a taste of the new DeWalt.
I am using a 3M hook and loop pad, which is fantastic. Makes it very easy to change polishing pads.
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Old 04-24-2006, 03:42 AM   #8
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3M Wool Pads..

Quote:
Originally Posted by beckybillrae
Where did you get the 3M pads? I bought 3 pads & a new buffer/polisher from Sears that came with a pad. One already has a hole in the side & the one that came with the tool is really loose & spins (or doesn't) when any pressure is put on it.

Becky
Hi Becky,
Here's a link to 3M site..You need to check around in your area.
http://products3.3m.com/catalog/us/e...er/output_html
The main thing is, to get the right size pads for your drill/compounding tool.
As was mention, they really do a nicer job beside lasting longer. Washing the pads numerous times, takes a lot out of them..The 3M pads just seem to hold up longer to the task. When polishing, I always kept a bucket near by for soaking them after the pads were no longer usable. This helped speed up the cleaning process at the end of the day. If I had to wash them in a machine or run them thru the dryer..I would always go to the local laundromat..I hate to say this but, you really don't want to use your own at home for this...
Six to eight pads should keep you polishing for the day.
ciao,
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Old 04-24-2006, 04:37 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uwe
A little note about the polishers:
I started with a snap-on variable speed polisher first. It was an older machine, made by DeWalt. The speed controlling switch gave out, so I had to send it in to get repaired. In the meantime, I used a DeWalt polisher with electronic speed regulkation, which keeps the speed of the machine at a steady 1000 or so rpm, regardless of how hard you "dig in". The second machine is far superior in my opinion. The electronic speed control makes the compounding very predictable and low effort. I won't go back top the snap-on polisher, now that I got a taste of the new DeWalt.
I am using a 3M hook and loop pad, which is fantastic. Makes it very easy to change polishing pads.
Is that the Dewalt 849 - you are referring to or do you have another reccommendation.
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Old 04-24-2006, 06:11 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sigv
Is that the Dewalt 849 - you are referring to or do you have another reccommendation.
That's the one.
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Old 04-24-2006, 10:15 AM   #11
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soak your pads in a solution of "stuff" (I'm on the road and can't look at the box) that is used to get wallpaper paste off the wall. You can get it at Home Depot. Works great, just squeeze them out and run clear water over them a couple times and let 'em dry. It's one way to avoid coating your washing machine with black and they are plenty clean enough for another polishing go.
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Old 04-24-2006, 10:32 AM   #12
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This what I used...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeppelinium
soak your pads in a solution of "stuff" (I'm on the road and can't look at the box) that is used to get wallpaper paste off the wall. You can get it at Home Depot. Works great, just squeeze them out and run clear water over them a couple times and let 'em dry. It's one way to avoid coating your washing machine with black and they are plenty clean enough for another polishing go.
Zep,
Not sure what you used..I soaked my pads with OxiClean for exellent results..
I'd be curious as to what you found that worked for you, as well...
ciao
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Old 04-24-2006, 12:08 PM   #13
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the "dark side" of polishing?

As a real newbie, I've been reading with great interest all the articles on polishing. However, I recently heard "another side". And please don't take this as some kind of Airstream blasphemy; it's just something to think about and get input.

I finally found a local RV place that was willing to work on my Airstream with the interest and care it deserves (not, "A '72? I don't know..." ) The tech walked through the coach with me with almost affectionate admiration at what good shape it is in as we discussed things that needed attention. When we looked at the outside, I asked him about the hail damage and polishing, since it's rather weathered and the clear coat is peeling. He told me something very thought provoking. "Even if you had the time and energy, I don't think you should shine it up to a mirror finish. It's too dangerous." He went on to describe (mind you this is an Airstream fan) trying to pass a mirror finish Airstream and literally being blinded because of the angle of the sun and the sheer size of the rig glinting in his eyes.

That made me wonder about following one at night. My boyfriend is a truck driver and one time when I went on the road with him, another trucker "chided" (polite word) him for the shiny quilted finish on the back doors of the truck reflecting back at him. My boyfriend took it in stride but remarked that in some states DOT regs prohibit a certain level of reflection on the backdoors of big rigs.

So, I'm wondering about the safety for other drivers with a mirror finish and bright sunlight. Thoughts and opinions?
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Old 04-26-2006, 08:01 PM   #14
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due to the curved shape, you generally only get a spot reflection, not the broad rectangle across the whole back, like you would from a truck's back door. Plus, the angle below the window is "down" and the angle above the beltline is "up", so you really wouldn't get much direct reflection back at a following vehicle.
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