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Old 05-21-2008, 09:57 AM   #43
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I agree

Frank,

I've used the milwaukee 1/2" drill for my compounding tool on two trailers now and it still going strong. Great tool. Not to mention using it as a drill for the rest of the restoration. Beats a battery powered drill on the big jobs.

What ever you do get one with the second handle around the chuck AND make sure it has a trigger lock that keeps the drill on. Makes life much easier.




Quote:
Originally Posted by 62overlander
.... If it works for you, it works for me. That is all I will say. Today I am buying a Milwaukee. I think it will work for me.
I always have something to add... I also have strong opinions of the yellow tool maker. There is no yellow anywhere in my shop except on the poplar shelf, I do have some yellow poplar.
opinions they are like a certain body part, we all have them.
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Old 05-21-2008, 10:15 AM   #44
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One great thing about this forum is that you do get differing opinions. 62 and I have obviously had varying experiences. Anybody reading can take the information presented and make a more informed decision.
We all like to feel that our position is correct - otherwise we wouldn't have made the choice we did. Over the course over my lifetime I have been proved wrong many times. In this case, I have tried to present my viewpoint without getting nasty, hopefully with success.
62 - If you or others view it differently, I appologize.
This forum is too valuable a place for info and conversation to be petty.
Have a great day,
Dave
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Old 05-21-2008, 12:00 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 62overlander
.... If it works for you, it works for me. That is all I will say. Today I am buying a Milwaukee. I think it will work for me.
I always have something to add... I also have strong opinions of the yellow tool maker. There is no yellow anywhere in my shop except on the poplar shelf, I do have some yellow poplar.
opinions they are like a certain body part, we all have them.
The Milwaukee polisher I saw at Sears yesterday looked really nice. Big, but nice. Trust me that polisher will never wear out. I almost bought it but wanted to look around a little bit longer and consider the other points of view. What do you think about the size, weight wise, of the Milwaukee? Price wise it's comparable to the yellow ones. But in terms of a high quality tool the Milwaukee is certainly the one to go with. What polisher are you using now? Please do report back on how you like the Milwaukee!
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Old 05-21-2008, 01:24 PM   #46
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62 - thanks for the instruction on wet sanding. What do you and others use to preserve the hard work of polishing? Automotive wax???? i 've read a decent amount about the clear coats, plasticoats, etc. . . I'm not 100% sure, but think that I am willing to wax/treat or what eer several times a yearto preserve high polished look and avoid actual polishing. btw - my polishing beer of choice is Tecate
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Old 05-21-2008, 01:58 PM   #47
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polisher's fatigue

Quote:
Originally Posted by nunya001
62 - thanks for the instruction on wet sanding. What do you and others use to preserve the hard work of polishing? Automotive wax???? i 've read a decent amount about the clear coats, plasticoats, etc. . . I'm not 100% sure, but think that I am willing to wax/treat or what eer several times a yearto preserve high polished look and avoid actual polishing. btw - my polishing beer of choice is Tecate
Good question. I'm no authority here but as I am beginning to understand the filiform corrosion is unlikely to occur unless the clearcoating is present. The filiform happens underneath the coating. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but you won't find filiform without clearcoat or at the very most only rarely. So calculating the probability of filiform corrosion occuring would make a good argument against clearcoating. I realize that clearcoating saves a lot of work in the beginning but not so in the longrun if corrosion results. So the question seems to be does filiform corrosion happen with waxing as a protectant?

I've heard on excellent authority that Tecate with fresh lime and salt makes an excellent remedy against polisher's fatigue! We'll definitely have to put some of those into the chest!
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Old 05-21-2008, 02:19 PM   #48
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Tecate in a can is generally my lake beer of choice, since bottles are outlawed on the water and a bad idea IMO anyway.

Remember the old 80s Tecate ads?

"Pop it, squeeze it, sh-sh-sh-shake it... Tecate."

Anyway, that's my understanding of filiform as well-- it occurs when the clearcoat breaks down, and it starts under the remaining clearcoat. But I'm certainly no expert.
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Old 05-21-2008, 02:35 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fyrzowt
One great thing about this forum is that you do get differing opinions. 62 and I have obviously had varying experiences. Anybody reading can take the information presented and make a more informed decision.
We all like to feel that our position is correct - otherwise we wouldn't have made the choice we did. Over the course over my lifetime I have been proved wrong many times. In this case, I have tried to present my viewpoint without getting nasty, hopefully with success.
62 - If you or others view it differently, I appologize.
This forum is too valuable a place for info and conversation to be petty.
Have a great day,
Dave
I should have used some smiley faces when I posted. I too have been wrong many a time. I did not mean to imply I am wrong and you are right or anything of the sort. I work with tools everyday. I work them hard and my expectations are different than the average guy. I am also looking to launch a restoration business in the very near future, so I am thinking long term when it comes to buying tools. Dave I did not mean to offend. I am an ass some times and apologize if any rivets were loosened.

Marcus, Sorry, but tecate is not on my list of beers. The Modela Especial and the Carta Blance, now you are talking. It all stems from a bus ride, mountain roads in the Mexican State of Oaxaca, and warm tecate...
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Old 05-21-2008, 02:41 PM   #50
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something else about wet sanding now. It has come to my attention that I may have been very wrong about it. I was listening to The VAP episode 20 today "the shiniest trailer" and was advised to not use the black paper(I did) for it contains silica carbide that reacts negatively on a molecular level with aluminum. I did rinse frequently with water between grits and hopefully I will be okay. So maybe it would be best to not follow any of my examples.
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Old 05-21-2008, 02:52 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 62overlander
something else about wet sanding now. It has come to my attention that I may have been very wrong about it. I was listening to The VAP episode 20 today "the shiniest trailer" and was advised to not use the black paper(I did) for it contains silica carbide that reacts negatively on a molecular level with aluminum. I did rinse frequently with water between grits and hopefully I will be okay. So maybe it would be best to not follow any of my examples.
Thanks for the warning and I'll certainly listen to episode 20...but what other choices do we have. Apparently the options are: (1) live with the corrosion (do nothing), (2) replace the segments (skins), or (3) use the black paper? I suppose, maybe, there is a fourth --20 rotations, or more, with the compounds and lots of cerveza. At least in my case the black paper seems appropriate for a black pearl...what additional damage is possible to a pirate ship in the first place?
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Old 05-21-2008, 02:56 PM   #52
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Filiform Corrosion..

Well Monocoque,

I have an 05 model and have had some filiform issues, mainly on the cast items such as taillights and entry door handle. I have had some where the skins (segments) overlap. My rig being under warranty they would take the segements off if I pressed the issue however not wanting to mess with the original buck rivited design I handled each area different according to the area. I had most skin filiform on the beltline or the "equator" of the body. The factory suggested a body molding that goes on the Classic line of trailers. They sanded very lightly and put a clearcoat on the affected areas, and proceeded to put the beltline on.

The bummer is out in the middle of a segment where say a rock hits it. The filiform will worm out from that. Obviously all newer rigs they are not really cabable of being polished without sick work as the aluminum is brushed. So I reguarly browse and treat the any noticed areas with GM clearcoat touch up. I am not sure how these newer rigs will look in 15 years....

I have enjoyed all of your threads and discussion....
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Old 05-21-2008, 03:15 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 62overlander
I should have used some smiley faces when I posted. I too have been wrong many a time. I did not mean to imply I am wrong and you are right or anything of the sort. I work with tools everyday. I work them hard and my expectations are different than the average guy. I am also looking to launch a restoration business in the very near future, so I am thinking long term when it comes to buying tools. Dave I did not mean to offend. I am an ass some times and apologize if any rivets were loosened.
Truly no offense taken. I understand that we sometimes take a position that we feel strongly about. I was actually more concerned that I hadn't come off as the male donkey...no harm, no foul.

On the subject of wet-dry paper color.
My local hardware store carries a 1500 grit W/D paper that is white or light grey. Also 2000 grit IINM.
There are other options.
Dave
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Old 05-21-2008, 05:10 PM   #54
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One more color! I have an "orange" B&D 1/2" drill that I use(d) for my compounding... bought it for about $50 at the local B&D rehab in the outlet mall.

Seems plenty strong for the money... doesn't buzz the hands, and strong enough so far for the job.

If you go the 1/2" drill route, you will need to buy an adapter that allows the chuck to use the screw in bonnet holders of the polishers. Also purchased at the local body part store.
One more choice!
Marc
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Old 05-21-2008, 05:38 PM   #55
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Ugh, too many choices.

I have no doubt that one day (hopefully sooner rather than later) I too will enter the world of polishing. And when that happens, I really don't know which route to go. I've read through pretty much every single polishing thread going back to 2002, and they seem to raise more questions than answers.

It seems that different tools, methods, products, and techniques work quite differently for various people.

The one thing I have taken away from the Polishing forum is that Southern Shine is, by far, the best stuff to use...

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Old 05-21-2008, 07:19 PM   #56
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sandpaper

Listening to VAP episode 20 is still on my list but I did drop by an auto paint and body supply shop on the south-side of SA after work today to investigate wet/dry sandpapers.

The owner of the shop, Mike, showed me his 3M automotive aftermarket products & systems catalog. I was especially interested in what kind of wet/dry sandpaper was available at least through 3M. According to the 3M catalog "wetordry abrasives" are manufactured by 3M in either silicon carbide or aluminum oxide.

I'm not sure why but the silicon carbide was offered only in "retail packs." On the other hand the aluminum oxide paper, 3M Imperial Wetordry, was offered in bulk and was in stock by the sheet in this particular shop. This is a black paper or an aluminum oxide mineral based paper which according to Mike all the neighborhood paint and body shops use on a regular basis.

I'm still interested in learning the difference between aluminum oxide paper and silicon carbide especially concerning how it might apply to work on our aluminum trailers for sanding out filiform corrosion?

BTW I also purchased a few bunches of the 0000 steel wool that was inconspicuously sitting there. I felt a wee bit guilty doing so as I'm sure it will lead to even worse forms of addiction.
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