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Old 04-23-2005, 01:08 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TravelCloud
Will I too be hammered and removed for not going along with the norm?
Nope...do whatever you want, it's your trailer & wallet.

Shari
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Old 04-23-2005, 02:14 PM   #30
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So I guess no one has bought one..lol

Im still going at it with nuvite and my drill.. One thing I can say is that eventually I will have a polished trailer..My neighbors all think I am insane (ive never given them reason not too). I was just hoping maybe someone had purchased Airmarks smaller polisher and gone at it.. im not so sure I want to be the guinea pig here. I feel better using what so many of you have used with great results. Like ive read here before the more work the better the shine.
For me these forums have been a blessing. A wealth of information and people who are willing to share there experience. So I dont have to make mistakes that could be avoided. I also must say that the more shine I get on my trailer the more satisfaction im getting. I will post some more pics on here soon... Thanks again for all your help.
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Old 04-23-2005, 03:52 PM   #31
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Airmark did the two 79 Motorhomes we had at our rally last weekend. They were done 4 years ago and except for some minor clouding which was easily repolished, they still look terrific.
Bottom line is do what you want with your money and time and effort. Then post a photo or two for all to see.
Who really cares what opinion you have of the methods others use to polish..its silly to go on about it.
Get out and polish brother, or don't.
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Old 04-23-2005, 05:29 PM   #32
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starting to blind my neighbors

Once I get it all compounded it will be alot easier. I found the cyclo really easy to handle.. really starting to see light at the end of the tunnel... But like the last post said... It doesnt get done by reading about it only...Any method you have to get down and dirty
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Old 04-23-2005, 05:51 PM   #33
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Ed that looks great.

I know what hard work it is to do one. And your's is 4 feet longer than mine!

But your efforts really shine through!
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Old 04-23-2005, 06:31 PM   #34
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Thanks Tim...I have a long way to go.. But neighbors are starting to stop while im working on it and giving me encouragement.. There is an inside rv storage near me...Its pretty expensive like 275 a month but im thinking it would be worth every penny.. Ive been paying 100 a month for 4 months and have never taken it there even once...I cant work on if its not at my house hehe. My interior is almost complete except the drapes, cushions and bathroom floor. after polishing for a while any other work on the trailer should be a walk in the park.. well almost hehehe
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Old 04-23-2005, 07:03 PM   #35
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Ed

Looks really great! I keep both my trailers in covered strorage - I usually do a once a year update on the polishing - on my 75, I do a once per year update - could go every other year since it rarely gets wet. The 58 will get polished for the first time this summer - so I think the covered stoarge is the way to go if there is anyway you can do it. I do know others who do not keep there trailers under cover - I think the once per year is a must - so a little more maintenance. It also very much depends on your climate - its very dry here.

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Old 04-23-2005, 08:20 PM   #36
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Looks great!

Hey Ed... you've got that California Shine going on!

I too have been polishing my Argosy. I'm using the wool pads and some 3M polishing compound (medium grit). I seems to work well, the only glaring problem is that i've found that the paint left just the faintest bit of layers on after the stripping in some areas. I'll have to go back and restrip again, to get the film completely off. So how does it work?

I'd call it the 10ft shine right now. Some areas (the front under the windows) looks about what I see with the nuvite. Other areas (especially with the film residue), the shine is not nearly as clear as what I see on this site from our members. However, it is going fast. I've got about 4 hours into it, and I'm about 2/3 done around the trailer. After I strip again, I'll compound and think about doing a finish polish with fine grit and foam pads. I'm looking for the minimalist shine!

From a distance, it's looking good. Pictures you ask.... I'm going shopping soon for another digital camera. My Nikon broke.
All my money is in the trailer!
New intellipower
Plumbing
Shine
bathroom remodel
etc...
Shine costs so far..
Black and Decker 1/2" drill (love it!) $29.00 at the B&D outlet store.
Bonnet kit (wool, and foam pads + backer plate) + 1 bottle of 3M compound $59.00
Pad adapter from Perfect polish $6.00
I have though about getting the nuvite sampler pack and comparing. I'm sure it will do a better job. But I'm so cheap!
Marc
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Old 04-24-2005, 07:55 AM   #37
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Not that I've done it- as the people who have shined "lots" of trailers will quickly jump on- but have witnessed this first hand. I'm also on the "gotta be a cheaper way" bandwagon.

Rouge sticks are between $7 and $12 each. Red is coarse, Green- finer, White- even finer. Take one- usually it seems that the green or white will suffice- and put it in a sock. Tie the sock in a knot and back over it with a car or trucks tire. Once its in smaller pieces, take the sock and hammer the smaller pieces into powder- pulverize them. Dump it into a can and as you need it, pour it into a bottle- 50/50 or 60/40 with mineral spirits- depending on how think you want it. Shake it up- or blend it in a blender and use it for your polish. No label, home made, a stick makes about a gallon of polish, and for next to nothing you have the same thing...

Easier to try that than get so heavily invested with these other products. All are made of rouge anyway!

I also have a nice Milwaukee buffer- holds the big pads. If you want to get the same type, they sell one at Harbor Freight that was on sale for about $30.

I saw an Argosy here in town that someone was polishing, but the top ends were black- can they be polished?
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Old 04-24-2005, 09:46 AM   #38
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It would save alot of money using the rouge bars.. but not any time. I too have that milwaukee variable speed buffer. Seems to work well. But Even with the finest of polish or rouge bars. the big wool pad will leave swirls. I did a few panels with my cyclo and sweatshirt with Nuvite c and s. and it was amazing how the swirls disapeared. It seemed that the sweatshirt loaded up too fast. Maybe I was using too much polish. but when it loads up then it scratches also. I also tried some polish by hand with a microfiber rag. didnt look good.
Thats why I was interested in Airmark tools. Im not as concerned with the money as I am with my time... Sure the Nuvite is expensive but the results are worth it. I did a test area with some rouge and it scratched heavily.
So for now im sticking with the nuvite. But I have a call into airmark. Even if that tool would require using the cyclo afterwards it would still be worth it. The compounding in alot of areas on mine requires 4-5 passes. time consuming.
if there is a cheap and easy way to polish I think the results will be poor.. and I want people to take a double take when they see my trailer...
Im game for an expensive but easy way to polish with an awesome finish..
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Old 04-24-2005, 11:41 AM   #39
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My research showed that there are coarse and soft pads, which can be followed by foam for additional swirl removal. If the rouge is cutting too hard- its possible to go to the next finer one- from red to green or green to white and check that. 3M makes the pads that looked best, but also a few other companies made less expensive ones- I liked the double sided approach- makes sense and is more cost effective.

I also recall both Airmark and Spec saying that they sell 2 different pads, coarse and fine, and that NO cyclo is needed. Most of the pro people I've asked have said its not used professionally. I think if a person has the strength to wax by hand, they shouldn't need a cyclo- the amount of strength to use a buffer/grinder is not that demanding. That "hobby person" ploy seems to scare people away from using well accepted tools into buying something specific, but not necessary.

I've never used one- but the man at the airport said "its really slow- just sort of wobbles around and takes forever" which I suppose explains the 150-200 hours, when they do one in a few days.

I think the microfiber rag would not be able to remove the polish with enough speed to move the metal- more for finishing up and cleaning it. 3M has some nice rags for that as well- softer than a cloth diaper! Good luck.
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Old 04-24-2005, 06:17 PM   #40
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Compounding should swirl...

is what I've read. You are right about the cost / shine thing Ed. Although I've gone cheap, it is by no means as pure a shine as what you and others have done with the cyclo. I think the Airmark drum, because it goes in one direction only, conditions the metal with only one way marks. The compounder with rotation gets multiple directional marks, which would cause the reflections to bend, creating the swirl pattern in the sun.

I've thought alot about what makes the cyclo and drum work so well. The cyclo simulates the hand pattern...small contact spots with realitively firm pressure. That's why, when you test your polish with a rag and hands, you cut into the metal so well. It takes a lot more pressure spread out over the rotational pad to cut as well with a drill / polisher. The Airmark, by comparison, puts a small contact area into a long surface area, creating a fast, larger cut (IMHO).

I am partly serious about designing a "do it yourself" conversion of a weedwacker. I don't see how a gas one with a drum and bonnet attached would be much different then the Airmark tool. I just don't have the fabrication skills neccessary to make one.

I personally would love to try one out!
Marc
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Old 04-24-2005, 08:32 PM   #41
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I agree with you on the rotation and swirls- what I was told is that its the main reason to avoid the nuvite process. It appears as if they steer people into using their cutting compound with a buffer- you scratch up your aluminum with it, and then are forced to spend the next 100+ hours using their other rouge based product line to remove the damage, i.e.- swirls.

The compound should be finer, and come after wet sanding that they said is done in one direction- no chance of swirls! I remembered seeing the 53 Flying Cloud that the airport folks were doing, and all the scratches were horizontal. It looked funny, but when I saw it again, its was free of any trace of what was there and shined up like new.

I think it makes sense- prep the surface with a light sanding, polish it with a coarse pad with green or white rouge, again with a soft pad and white rouge, follow with white rouge on a foam pad for swirl removal. Of course- I haven't done it yet- but I'm also not of an IQ that would make me jump at everything that is marketed and pumped. This way is much less expensive- anyone else have a reasonable opinion coupled with an open mind?
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Old 04-25-2005, 12:02 AM   #42
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Go for it!

I think the best way is to try it out. Please send pics (actually, I'd like to see your AS's skin before the polish too). We can all learn through experiences.

I'm not knocking either process, I just like to understand how each works. Polishing cars (which I used to do) is a simular process as the nuvite. Cut old oxidation first, then polish out the swirls. I think it'd be close to impossible not to have any marks after a compound job. Even the sanding (which is really just a faster compounding process) marks the aluminum (hence the horizontal marks you saw). The polishing takes them out.

After looking at the Polishing Guru's site, I think a third way (although the process and polish is unknown) is out there too. Excellent results too.
Marc
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