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Old 11-11-2012, 12:31 PM   #85
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The only tool that you will need is the one setting at home on the workbench.
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Old 11-11-2012, 05:14 PM   #86
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Tools Explained....

Brought back an old post of mine.....


DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light . Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh--!'

SKIL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race.

TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes , trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

BAND SAW: A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER: A tool for opening paint cans.. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.

PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we are trying to hit.

UTILITY KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.

SON-OF-A-BITCH TOOL: (A personal favorite!) Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling 'Son of a BITCH!' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you will need.

Hope you found this informative.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:45 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robert cross View Post
brought back an old post of mine.....


drill press: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

Wire wheel: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light . Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'oh sh--!'

skil saw: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

Pliers: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

Belt sander: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

Hacksaw: One of a family of cutting tools built on the ouija board principle... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

Vise-grips: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

Oxyacetylene torch: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race.

Table saw: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

Hydraulic floor jack: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes , trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

Band saw: A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.

Two-ton engine hoist: A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.

Phillips screwdriver: Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out phillips screw heads.

Straight screwdriver: A tool for opening paint cans.. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.

Pry bar: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

Hose cutter: A tool used to make hoses too short.

Hammer: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we are trying to hit.

Utility knife: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.

Son-of-a-bitch tool: (a personal favorite!) any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling 'son of a bitch!' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you will need.

Hope you found this informative.

lmao :d:d:d
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Old 11-12-2012, 06:24 PM   #88
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Hey Bob, I read this the first time you posted it, any yet I find it still makes me smile! I also find that last tool a lot! ;-)

Terry
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:22 AM   #89
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Man, I am looking into a TT perhaps in 2014 and doing my homework....asking for some tools for christmas this year likely as im tired of my deplete tool set at home...I have next to no tools!

I have gleaned some good advice on here!

About tire repair kits...I know how to plug a tire, and I used fix a flat in a pinch one time...ive seen these "slime" repair kits...what is all needed in a tire repair kit? I do not want to miss anything with that in the future cause that seems likely.

I have AAA - I think I have some sort of premium version that would tow a vehicle up to 100 miles if needed, but I am not at all sure if they would do anything about a TT? But I would rather on a trip have everything I need for a flat!

I have a 12v plug in compressor currently that plugs into the cig. lighter, but jeez it is SLOW - but it works for my car - barely - I did not know there was a version that attaches direct to the battery...will those pump faster. I like the CO2 tank idea perhaps, but if lighter would favor a good compact compressor that will get the job done in a reasonable amount of time.

Also, how do I know which tire gauge is "high quality"? Recommendations?

Besides tools - in the event of not having the tool or not having the competency to repair an issue on the road or otherwise. What are good resources to program into your cell phone? I got my AAA but I figured that may be a question worth asking?
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:48 AM   #90
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I've only been doing this three months, so I'm still a newbie, but I can tell you what kind of stuff I've assembled. I keep it all in the plastic bin under the lounge next to the door.

Quote:
Man, I am looking into a TT perhaps in 2014 and doing my homework....asking for some tools for christmas this year likely as im tired of my deplete tool set at home...I have next to no tools!
I bought a little set at Ikea, It has a hammer pliers screwdriver with a bunch of different heads. So far it's served me well. I keep Electrical and Duct Tape in there. A can of spray Silicone lube, and a can of spray white lithium grease. A box cutter. A small compartmented container where I put screws, and other assorted stuff I generate as I work on things. Fuses. Very important! Get
some 30 amp slo-blo's for the power jack. They can be hard to find, so when you find some, buy a bunch. I know there's more in there, but that's all I can think of now.

Quote:
I have gleaned some good advice on here!

About tire repair kits...I know how to plug a tire, and I used fix a flat in a pinch one time...ive seen these "slime" repair kits...what is all needed in a tire repair kit? I do not want to miss anything with that in the future cause that seems likely.
I don't bother. I wouldn't trust a plugged tire. Spares and ....

Quote:
I have AAA - I think I have some sort of premium version that would tow a vehicle up to 100 miles if needed, but I am not at all sure if they would do anything about a TT? But I would rather on a trip have everything I need for a flat!
I have AAA as well but I sprung for the Good Sam coverage. I read good things on here about it, it's pretty cheap and the coverage seems to be good. I haven't had to use it yet. (Knock Wood)

Quote:
I have a 12v plug in compressor currently that plugs into the cig. lighter, but jeez it is SLOW - but it works for my car - barely - I did not know there was a version that attaches direct to the battery...will those pump faster. I like the CO2 tank idea perhaps, but if lighter would favor a good compact compressor that will get the job done in a reasonable amount of time.
I have a 120 v one. It works pretty quickly and if need be I can try to run it off the inverter. Not sure how that's going to work. But I haven't boondocked yet, and if my tires need air I'm going to do it while still on shore power.

Quote:
Besides tools - in the event of not having the tool or not having the competency to repair an issue on the road or otherwise. What are good resources to program into your cell phone? I got my AAA but I figured that may be a question worth asking?
Both AAA and Good Sam have Smart Phone Apps that call and give them your GPS coordinates. Gotta have those.


I'm sure others with more experience than me will jump in.

Gotta tell ya. I wasn't sure I was gonna like this Airstreaming thing. I'm a believer now. You won't regret it.
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Old 12-07-2012, 12:58 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by daveswenson View Post

I have a 120 v one. It works pretty quickly and if need be I can try to run it off the inverter. Not sure how that's going to work. But I haven't boondocked yet, and if my tires need air I'm going to do it while still on shore power.
Regarding power tools (air compressor or otherwise) test at home with the inverter before assuming it will work. The AC wave shape generated by the inverter is different from house current and some power tools may not run on an inverter.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:42 PM   #92
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awesome! thanks Dave! Ill have to look into this alternative to AAA and consider...COOL about the iPhone App! Im going to get that now

Not sure what "slo-blo" means

This may be a silly question, but how many spares to people bring with them? Hard to imagine two going out, but its happened im sure...not sure the weight and cost is worth the insurance though really....

I have a 500 dollar xmas budget....I have nearly zero tools and have been dying to buy myself some tools to use...im always bumming my elder neighbor for his tools (i ALWAYS bring them back).

I had been eyeballing a craftsman toolset for a while to wait till the price came down...picked up 309 count mechanic's toolset for 198 bucks today (usually 300) online and a screwdriver 23 count set...all for 250 bucks total....

Combine this with tools I already have kicking around, and I am getting pretty close to prepared perhaps

Now I just need a bag or box to organize and store em...

Not sure if anyway asked this...but what kind of jack to folks bring? Just like a bottle jack perhaps?
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:12 PM   #93
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Good call on the toolset. You have way more than you will need.

Slo-blo is a type of fuse that has a slight time delay before it blows, usually identified by a spring inside. I had to go to three auto parts stores before I found a box of them at NAPA.

As far as a jack, maybe I'm naive but I don't carry one, other than the one for the tv. To change a trailer tire with a tandem all you need is something to raise the other tire in the pair, like leveling blocks. That will give you enough lift to change the flat.

Again, I'm new at this, but have spent 100's (thousands?) of hours studying this forum and anything else I can find. So someone else can jump in.
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:26 PM   #94
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Hey PharmGeek & Daveswenson, welcome to the forums! You'll find lots of helpful information within this group! I've been putting together a list from several threads here on the forums, regarding this subject, although I haven't "cleaned" it up yet. I'll send it to you if you want. Pharmgeek, check your messages, I've sent you a pm!

Regards, Terry
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:27 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PharmGeek View Post
About tire repair kits...I know how to plug a tire, and I used fix a flat in a pinch one time...ive seen these "slime" repair kits...what is all needed in a tire repair kit?

I have AAA - I think I have some sort of premium version that would tow a vehicle up to 100 miles if needed, but I am not at all sure if they would do anything about a TT?

I have a 12v plug in compressor currently that plugs into the cig. lighter, but jeez it is SLOW - but it works for my car - barely - I did not know there was a version that attaches direct to the battery...will those pump faster.

Also, how do I know which tire gauge is "high quality"? Recommendations?
I've had to plug a tire a couple of times far from garages. The plugs held for years, 10's of thousands of miles. No leaks, no problems. I know a patch inside the tire seems to be better, but I've had no problems with plugs.

Check with AAA about towing; I think they want to avoid RV's. I think AAA is mostly a marketing outfit that makes lower quality road maps and tour books plus they stopped publishing their RV campground books. Still cheaper way to get maps and some info (they give you Woodall's now, but I'd rather have more sources). We have Good Sam for road insurance because they have a good reputation for RV's. They'll tow your car too. Get the cheapest AAA plan for the maps and tour books; that's all you'll need from them.

Check online for reasonably priced compressors that can go 100 psi and up and attach to the battery. Some are around $60 and pretty compact. If you have D load range tires, you need 65 psi; E load range will be up to 80 psi. Cigarette lighter compressors can't do either (it might work for D range if you plan on waiting a couple of years; a small compressor would probably catch fire after a few days).

I missed the reference to slo-blo, but probably that means fuses. This type won't blow right away in case there's a surge, but will blow if the problem lasts for a few seconds. They are specified for certain circuits and items, but not a bad idea for all fuses.

I have a bottle jack for the trailer that I've never used. I also carry scrap 2x10's to roll one wheel off the ground so the other tire is off the ground (this doesn't work with single axle trailers). It takes about 3 1/2" or a little more to get the wheel off the ground, so 3 2x10's work. Cut a bevel at the end of the pieces to make it easier on the tires and make each piece a little shorter than the next—bottom one 3-4', middle one 2-3', top on 1 1/2'—that'll work. You could pile up a set of the legos like plastic blocks used to level a trailer, but it would get kind of unstable. You can use 2x8's too, but wider pieces are easier to get the tire centered on. I may sometime need the bottle jack and would put in on a few 2x120's (small on centered on top distributes the weight better, but I'd be really nervous about getting under the trailer in that situation. Using a jack and pieces of 4x4 or 6x6 or jack stand to hold up the trailer with the jack would be safer. I use a floor jack at home with jack stand for backup.

Cheap plastic tool boxes can be found at big box stores like Lowe's. They will hold a lot and you'll save more money for tools.

Thinks about wrenches if you don't have them in those kits—channel locks, small vise grip (there's not much use for a vise grip except if you have wrecked screw heads), linesman's pliers, small and large needle nose, and a really big channel locks (big means a couple of feet long) plus a set of combination (open and closed end) wrench, allen set, and a ratchet set. Looks like you've got lots of screwdrivers, but I hope you have a really long one (+ 2') more for prying than for screwing. Then there are all those weird ends for strange screws (star drive, square drive, etc.) that usually come in a kit with a screwdriver handle and shaft. Rubber mallet and a hammer (to be used sparingly and to be taken away from you if you have a quick temper). A long magnet and a mirror can help too. Washers. Electrical crimping set. Auto wire. Electrical tape. Spare fuses (don't forget jack fuse). And, of course, beer.

Gene
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:15 PM   #96
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Thanks Gene,
How could I have forgotten beer? Told ya I was new.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:24 AM   #97
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Self healing silicone tape for emergency leak repairs.
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Old 12-08-2012, 08:22 AM   #98
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If you are looking for the Airstream quality of air compressors, then look no further than Extreme Outback. I have their "Jr" which is mounted in a red tool box along with included accessories. I also bought their tire repair kit although when I have had flats on my AS, there is nothing left to patch. I have used my air compressor numerous times to air up both my TV and the AS. There is nothing around as good IMHO.

Product : Extreme Outback
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