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Old 07-29-2013, 07:29 AM   #15
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At one time I worked for NASA. They established these specs. by measuring the extension of the studs and therefore determined the exact stress on the assembly. Using lubricant allowed them to reduce the frictional variance and improve the repeat-ability of the resultant stress. Airstream and the car companies develop their torque specifications without lubricant. Using lubricant on the treads and the torques specified by the dry experiments will result in over stressing and damaging the studs. If you want to use lubricant, then you will have to conduct your own tests to establish new lower torque values that will be required to have the studs to remain in the proportional range stress and resulting in stresses that are 80 to 90% of the yield strength of studs. Personal note: It is easier to follow Airstream's engineering department recommendations and do not use lubricant.
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Old 07-30-2013, 12:43 AM   #16
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lubricant

Thanks for the warnings about using lubricants. You have convinced us not to use them.
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Old 07-30-2013, 07:12 AM   #17
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I have used anti-seize on every wheel stud i've encountered since the 1970's and never had a single incident, never a rusted or seized nut.
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Old 07-30-2013, 07:54 AM   #18
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Since many of us use a battery powered drill to raise and lower the stabilizer jacks and maybe part of their Hensley hitch, why not acquire a 1/4" shaft small rotary wire brush to clean the lug bolt threads? Then the drill is doing two necessary jobs and makes the acquisition cost of the drill justifiable, if that is necessary for new toys.
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Old 07-30-2013, 08:54 AM   #19
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If you will research for yourself instead of listening to a few people on here you will find that alcoa wheels ( which I believe airstream uses) actually list 2 different torgue specs whether you use antisieze or not on your lug nuts.I am a certified auto mechanic and have put antisieze on lug studs for as long as I have been working on cars and never had a problem. Every time I change tire for rotation I always apply it to the threads of the lug studs. Don't get it on the face of the hub or back of wheel. If you ever have a nut rust to the lug you will come back and wish you had applies it to your studs but then it will be too late because you will be replacing studs and nuts. Whatever your decision Good Luck.
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Old 08-05-2013, 02:16 PM   #20
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Anti-Seize is a good thing, in spite of the flack. On thing I do not see a lot of here is Torque Wrenches. There is a torque spec on all of the wheel lugs based on type of wheel. One should never use a breaker bar or impact driver to tighten wheel lugs. Over tightened wheel lugs will break off on a rough back road. Torque wrenches are readily avaliable on ebay and are reasonably priced.
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Old 08-05-2013, 05:25 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightdi View Post
At one time I worked for NASA. They established these specs. by measuring the extension of the studs and therefore determined the exact stress on the assembly. Using lubricant allowed them to reduce the frictional variance and improve the repeat-ability of the resultant stress. Airstream and the car companies develop their torque specifications without lubricant. Using lubricant on the treads and the torques specified by the dry experiments will result in over stressing and damaging the studs. If you want to use lubricant, then you will have to conduct your own tests to establish new lower torque values that will be required to have the studs to remain in the proportional range stress and resulting in stresses that are 80 to 90% of the yield strength of studs. Personal note: It is easier to follow Airstream's engineering department recommendations and do not use lubricant.
Good poop Dwight!
Yes, stretch and twist of bolt during assembly can allow "over stress"..

This reminds me of Harley Torque specs,,,... Tighten until it juuuuuuuuuuuust starts to twist OFF, then back off 1/4 turn.

Seriously, AS is working with NEW parts, so ideal for establish of specs.

I am with Panheaddave. I do NOT totally coat the threads but they do get a wipe and little dab. I then run lug nuts in/out to ensure even coat and ZERO binds. The real holding power of the lug nut is where it mates to the wheel.. That is where most "torque" will be absorbed. Not the threads.

But, this is like making coffee... If you are happy and like the taste, "Carry On!"

Peace
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Old 08-06-2013, 06:43 AM   #22
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The question was how to REMOVE lug nuts so still have to go with an impact wrench, it lessens the possibility of a broken stud and is the easiest. To tighten lug nuts by all means use a torque wrench.
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Old 08-06-2013, 07:28 AM   #23
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Removal on roadside favors the prepared.

Proper condition of running gear excluded, here is similar to our carry item .. From Harbor Freight or your own favorite...

Chicago Electric Power Tools - Item#92349

When I find a US made one I will probably get it. Meanwhile, this suffices.
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Old 08-06-2013, 08:04 AM   #24
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Look for DOT stamp on sidewall, should have an 05 or 06 if original.
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:35 PM   #25
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The tires came via breaker bar and air wrench. Then we opted to upsize from 15" to 16" aluminum wheels outfitted with Goodyear 10 ply load range E tires. We should be all set to roll. Now onto replacing our 19" TV with about a 22" with a digital receiver.
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