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Old 09-26-2014, 10:21 PM   #1
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1969 23' Safari
crescent city , California
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removing a/c

I would like to remove the old Armstrong A/C unit from my 69 safari and patch the hole on the roof has anyone gone thru this? and can you lead me thru the process? Thanks
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Old 09-26-2014, 10:33 PM   #2
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1959 24' Tradewind
Astoria , Oregon
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I too removed an ancient A/C from my trailer, not liking it cosmetically and not needing it meterologically. But I filled the void with a Fantastic Fan instead of patching the hole. It has become my kitchen vent/exhaust fan and works very well.
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Old 09-27-2014, 04:41 AM   #3
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1967 26' Overlander
Huntsville , Alabama
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When repairing a leak on my Armstrong a while back, I found that screws hold the top unit in place.

Here is a link that might provide insight:

http://www.knology.net/~tcwilliams/ACLeak.htm

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Old 09-27-2014, 08:17 AM   #4
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1973 21' Globetrotter
Houston , Texas
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It is a pretty straight forward process.

I did mine after having done a shell-off, and used the wooden gantries that I had lifted the shell with as the basis for scaffolding to provide a solid platform to work around the AC from. Other folks just lean a ladder up against the awning rail and then walk around on the roof. When I do this, I am careful to step on rivet lines although others have said this care is unnecessary. Just don't step on the formed end-caps. I used a chain hoist in an nearby overhanging tree to lower the AC to the ground once it was removed.

My original AC was held in place by a buzzillion pop rivets and a solidified layer of some kind of caulking. I started out drilling the rivets, but found that it was difficult to keep the bit centered because the shafts of the rivets were steel, and the bodies aluminum. Having drilled out the rivets, I still had to do something about the layer of caulk. So I ended up putting a metal cutting blade on my oscillating tool and just running it under the edge of the AC all the way around. I cut through the caulking and the rivets in one shot and had the AC released from the roof rather quickly. I wasn't concerned about scratching the aluminum roof as I was going to patch the area anyway.

After the AC was off, I put a scraper blade on the oscillating tool and used it to clean off any residual caulking. I used a spring punch to knock the remaining rivet halves the rest of the way through. I cut my patch material to extend and inch or so past the line of old rivet holes. I then predrilled rivet holes in my patch. Next, I positioned the patch on the roof and began drilling the rivet holes in the roof, using my predrilled patch holes as guides. I put in a cleco each time I drilled a hole. Once all the holes were drilled, I removed all the clecos, and put a healthy amount of vulkem around my new rivet line, and filled the old rivet holes as well. I then put the ptch back in place, re-cleco'd it in a few strategic places, and buck-riveted the patch in place (my interior skins were out of the trailer).

In my case, I installed a modern AC unit in a hole that I cut in my patch. If you are not going to reinstall an AC, then you will need to patch the interior as well. If your interior skins are in place, you will have to use Olymip rivets on your exterior patch in order to get your rivets to match.

Good luck!
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Old 09-27-2014, 06:11 PM   #5
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1969 23' Safari
crescent city , California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belegedhel View Post
It is a pretty straight forward process.

I did mine after having done a shell-off, and used the wooden gantries that I had lifted the shell with as the basis for scaffolding to provide a solid platform to work around the AC from. Other folks just lean a ladder up against the awning rail and then walk around on the roof. When I do this, I am careful to step on rivet lines although others have said this care is unnecessary. Just don't step on the formed end-caps. I used a chain hoist in an nearby overhanging tree to lower the AC to the ground once it was removed.

My original AC was held in place by a buzzillion pop rivets and a solidified layer of some kind of caulking. I started out drilling the rivets, but found that it was difficult to keep the bit centered because the shafts of the rivets were steel, and the bodies aluminum. Having drilled out the rivets, I still had to do something about the layer of caulk. So I ended up putting a metal cutting blade on my oscillating tool and just running it under the edge of the AC all the way around. I cut through the caulking and the rivets in one shot and had the AC released from the roof rather quickly. I wasn't concerned about scratching the aluminum roof as I was going to patch the area anyway.

After the AC was off, I put a scraper blade on the oscillating tool and used it to clean off any residual caulking. I used a spring punch to knock the remaining rivet halves the rest of the way through. I cut my patch material to extend and inch or so past the line of old rivet holes. I then predrilled rivet holes in my patch. Next, I positioned the patch on the roof and began drilling the rivet holes in the roof, using my predrilled patch holes as guides. I put in a cleco each time I drilled a hole. Once all the holes were drilled, I removed all the clecos, and put a healthy amount of vulkem around my new rivet line, and filled the old rivet holes as well. I then put the ptch back in place, re-cleco'd it in a few strategic places, and buck-riveted the patch in place (my interior skins were out of the trailer).

In my case, I installed a modern AC unit in a hole that I cut in my patch. If you are not going to reinstall an AC, then you will need to patch the interior as well. If your interior skins are in place, you will have to use Olymip rivets on your exterior patch in order to get your rivets to match.

Good luck!
Thanks for the great information. Idd like to keep the old A/C unit but I cant find anyone around here that can repair it. I like the idea of installing a vent in place of the leaking A/C.
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