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Old 02-02-2016, 08:31 PM   #15
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I have a 2014 RAM 1500 with the Goodyear Wrangler SR-A P275/60R20 tires from the factory. (made in USA) I have about 32,000 miles on them now and they are wearing just fine. I'm pretty sure I should easily get 45,000 miles of service from them. I have had three punctures, but that isn't the fault of Goodyear. They are quiet, ride well and the handling is pretty fair. They do not have very good traction on wet pavement or sand/snow/off road. These tires have actually renewed my confidence in Goodyear. I think I may put a set of Goodyear Wrangler Adventure with Kevlar AT tires on when the SR-As wear out. Goodyear makes many different lines of tires. I think their OE supply contracts are an acceptable tire. Not the best, but not the worst either.
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Old 02-02-2016, 08:39 PM   #16
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I like Michelin tires. They get their good reputation from producing good tires.

However, this line from Michelin,
Quote:
ST (Special Trailer) tires are constructed with heavier materials in the casing as compared to passenger rated tires giving the ST tires more strength and load carrying capacity. ST tires also have a stiffer sidewall and flex less making them more compatible with the trailer’s suspension system.
tells me they are just giving you a standard canned answer. The statement above has been refuted by a tire engineer on this forum.
Bringing up the liability concern is not founded in any case or violation that can be referenced. I think it is self propagating FUD and nothing more. If you make the proper calculations and install tires of the correct size, load carrying capacity, and derating if necessary, then you are doing it right. How could you be held liable for using a tire that is being used within its design limits?
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Old 02-02-2016, 08:47 PM   #17
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Hey Lance, for me that's the disappointment, a previous truck turned 45k before replacing tires. Unfortunately I don't remember the manufacture but 25k is not acceptable, they were probably Michelins. My wife drives a 2011 Cadillac SRX with 35k miles & her tires are not Goodyear & still good. Just frustrating !!!
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Old 02-02-2016, 08:53 PM   #18
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ALL the trailer tires available today in the USA are made overseas and that includes the Goodyear Marathon brand of trailer tire. The trailer tires available to us today in USA are JUNK!

I run LT truck tires on all my trailers including my 1 car, 2 car, enclosed and RV trailers. I run 75-80 MPH loaded all the time on the interstate. The trailer tire problems I experienced IN THE PAST ALL ENDED when I started running good quality name brand LT truck tires on my trailers replacing the offshore ST trailer tires.

I have had excellent service from the Firestone Destination LT tires and/or Michelin LT truck tires installed on my trailers. NO failures, NO tread separations, NO NOTHING! Just miles and miles of happy hauling.

The absolute BEST LT truck tire out there is the Michelin XPS tire. It should be as it has an all steel construction including the tread belts AND all steel sidewall tire belts. These tires are HEAVY as hell and expensive as hell at $300 a pop. The last set I purchased lasted over 100,000 miles on my Ford Dually truck. Available only in limited sizes they are the best LT truck tires out there IF you can stand the upfront cost to buy em!
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Old 02-02-2016, 08:58 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Top View Post
I like Michelin tires. They get their good reputation from producing good tires.

However, this line from Michelin,
tells me they are just giving you a standard canned answer. The statement above has been refuted by a tire engineer on this forum.
Bringing up the liability concern is not founded in any case or violation that can be referenced. I think it is self propagating FUD and nothing more. If you make the proper calculations and install tires of the correct size, load carrying capacity, and derating if necessary, then you are doing it right. How could you be held liable for using a tire that is being used within its design limits?
I'm not a lawyer but you're the one ( or anyone ) who has to spend thousands of dollars defending yourself because of this issue. Personally I believe LT tires are great for trailer application but they are not designed for that use, that's my point. If you think Michelin is going to assist you in this type defense, well I don't!
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Old 02-02-2016, 09:09 PM   #20
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My 2008 GM 1500 came with Goodyear Wranglers. I replaced them at 5 years use with about 110 K ( kilometres) and went to the wranglers with Kevlar. Now have about 40k on the new tires. BUT! Like with my Goodyear ST's which I have had only one issue with in 10 years ( my fault) and thousands of K's I regularly check air pressure and when towing, do not drive faster than the recommended 65MPH.
I personally have only had one experience with Michelin tires and they were a dismal failure. Possibly it has coloured my opinion.
So, I personally won't use anything other than Goodyear, as I won't drive anything other than GM.
Doesn't make other makes and models bad but when you have good experiences with whatever you are using one tends to keep on using them.


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Old 02-03-2016, 06:38 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrjkq View Post
Personally I believe LT tires are great for trailer application but they are not designed for that use, that's my point. If you think Michelin is going to assist you in this type defense, well I don't!
I don't believe any tire manufacturer will "go to bat" for you for any reason concerning aftermarket tire choices. No tire or vehicle manufacturer should have to. We can make informed decisions for ourselves. I am responsible for the decisions I make. No one else.

I'm not a lawyer or an engineer, but I do believe that when LT tires are designed and tested, use on a trailer is one of the modes that is considered. It is, and has been for many decades, accepted practice to use Light Truck tires on trailer axles. Before tire companies got the bright idea to strengthen the bead area of a passenger (P) tire so it could hold more air pressure, stamp it with FOR TRAILER SERVICE ONLY, restrict its speed to 65 MPH and brand it with ST225/75R15 LRD people used LT tires on trailers.

Now, we all know that Airstream is producing trailers that roll off the assembly line with LT225/75R16 LRE Michelin tires. Airstream will put those tires on your trailer for you at the service department as an upgrade. If you want to bore yourself reading the CFR concerning tires, you'll see that the vehicle manufacturer is responsible for installing tires that are the correct size and load carrying capacity etc. The tire manufacturer will always tell you to install replacement tires in accordance with what the vehicle manufacturer specifies on the tire and loading information placard.

Call or write Airstream concerning tires for your trailer.
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Old 02-03-2016, 07:38 AM   #22
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People who use trailers everyday for a living hauling cargo, livestock, etc., have learned that ST tires do not hold up abuse. ST tires do ok as long as you keep a close eye on them. That means jacking up the trailer, rotate the tire, look for broken belts, dry rot, raised tread, etc... While you are there you can adjust the brakes shoes. Keeping your equipment in good shape will minimize your liability risk and tire problems on the highway.
The last time I went to the cattle stock yards most of the stock trailers were running 16" LT tires. If you ask the owner why it is because the factory ST did not hold up to the abuse of going off-road and then driving 70 mph down the highway.
While this is anecdotal evidence sometimes you can learn from others mistakes - there are times when common sense can trump theory or gov't regulations.
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Old 02-03-2016, 08:45 AM   #23
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We have a multi-axle livestock trailer that came with LT tires and has a label with the appropriate info including loading and air pressure for those LT tires. No issue with that trailer. But not so on the AS. The technical process to select a replacement LT tire for the ST tire that was installed by the manufacturer is fairly straightforward. The process is not perfect or there would not be so many threads on the subject. For me the technical issues get down to making sure that the replacement tires are going to meet the loading and mobility requirements while not creating other issues such as generating harmful vibrations. The liability issue is probably nothing more than what your insurance company is willing to allow. This could be a non-issue if AS would expand their tire/loading label and list more tires such as LT tires of a specific size and label. If this would get rid of the liability uncertainty then lets ask AS to send us a replacement label.
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Old 02-03-2016, 08:59 AM   #24
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One thing to remember is same sized LT tires may not have the same load capacity as ST tires.
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Old 02-03-2016, 09:05 AM   #25
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From Michelin .......

"We do not recommend using LT (light truck) tires*on trailers that specify ST tires. If the trailer manufacturer calls for ST tires, it is important to replace with ST tires in order to maintain the load requirement."


Airstream do now supply LT tires as standard on some of there higher end trailers don't they?

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Old 02-03-2016, 09:48 AM   #26
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The differences in the load rating between a 225/75-15 Goodyear Marathon trailer tire and a 225/75-15 Goodyear Wrangler ASA LT Tire is below.

Information directly from the spec page for each tire at Tirerack.com:

Goodyear Marathon: Load class C Max loading 2150 lbs. at 50 PSI

Goodyear Wrangler SRA LT: Load class 102S SL Mx Loading 1874 lbs at 44 PSI

IF you have single axle trailer your MAXIMUM load rating for 2 Goodyear Marathon trailer tires is 4300 lbs. The MAXIMUM load rating for 2 Goodyear Wrangler SRA tires on a single axle trailer is 3748 lbs for difference of 552 lbs.

Therefore is the load rating a BIG DEAL???

Could be with a single axle Airstream trailer that is overloaded with camping crap, water and other items. Definitely NOT an issue with a dual axle Airstream trailer.

These are the REAL numbers!!!
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Old 02-03-2016, 10:55 AM   #27
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Vintageracer - YES - the numbers are the big deal.
You have to select the appropriate LT sized tire to get back into the proper load range. Sometimes this means going up to a 16" tire, typically on the 30' and larger traielers. A wise person should also compare the actual weight of the trailer fully loaded and give margin of error. At a minimum the combination of the two tires should be equal or greater than the axle GAWR (gross axle weight rating).
For example a single axle trailer with an axle rating 5,000 lb (GAWR) should have an E rated ST tire or LT tire.
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Old 02-03-2016, 11:09 AM   #28
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More tire dilemma!

Quote:
Originally Posted by vintageracer View Post
The differences in the load rating between a 225/75-15 Goodyear Marathon trailer tire and a 225/75-15 Goodyear Wrangler ASA LT Tire is below.

Information directly from the spec page for each tire at Tirerack.com:

Goodyear Marathon: Load class C Max loading 2150 lbs. at 50 PSI

Goodyear Wrangler SRA LT: Load class 102S SL Mx Loading 1874 lbs at 44 PSI

IF you have single axle trailer your MAXIMUM load rating for 2 Goodyear Marathon trailer tires is 4300 lbs. The MAXIMUM load rating for 2 Goodyear Wrangler SRA tires on a single axle trailer is 3748 lbs for difference of 552 lbs.

Therefore is the load rating a BIG DEAL???

Could be with a single axle Airstream trailer that is overloaded with camping crap, water and other items. Definitely NOT an issue with a dual axle Airstream trailer.

These are the REAL numbers!!!

Could it be that you're comparing the wrong tire? Marathon LRDs are rated 2540 at 65psi. And aren't derared for trailer use.
And Maxxis M8008 LRE are good for 2800 lbs. Each. Total 5600 lbs.
These are the real numbers.


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