Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-20-2015, 12:48 PM   #29
1950 Flying Cloud 7039
 
FC7039's Avatar
 
1950 21' Flying Cloud
Allen , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 550
Maybe something like this
http://www.ebay.com/itm/High-Tempera...gAAOSwRLZT-GI2


Sent from my iPad using Airstream Forums
__________________

__________________
FC7039 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 01:18 PM   #30
3 Rivet Member
 
Cardinal283's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 202
Ok so Wabbiteer got me to thinking about this a little more. He is right that aluminum does not radiate heat well. It has a thermal radiation emissivity coefficient of .02-.03 depending on its temperature. 0 is the lowest meaning that it doesn't radiate heat at all and 1 is the highest meaning that it radiates all its heat. However it does conduct heat. It's thermal conductivity is 200 Watts/m Kelvin (Fiberglass by comparison is 0.04 Watts/m Kelvin). Meaning aluminum does a pretty good job of conducting heat from exterior skin to rib to interior skin and eventually to the air in direct contact with the interior skin. Remember this is still conductive heat whereas radiant heat is actually infrared light and can travel through a vacuum. Radiant heat isn't the issue here, so I want to reduce the conductive heat transfer between skins. I found a list of materials and their thermal conductivity. Things like fiberglass insulation and polyurethane foam are out because they compress and will make the interior skins bubble up and birds eye around the rivets. But I did find a few other interesting things on the list. Namely cork. It's flexible, semi rigid, and its conductivity is .07 Watts/m Kelvin. I would imagine some thin cork strips along the face of the ribs would provide a good thermal conductivity barrier. The question is how will they hold up over time?
__________________

__________________
Cardinal283 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 02:11 PM   #31
Rivet Master
 
cameront120's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
North Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,422
Images: 23
Cork is organic and could cause problems for you in fairy short order if any water is absorbed and unable to dry thoroughly. It is also a compressible material.
__________________
Cameron & the Labradors, Kai & Samm
North Vancouver, BC
Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! - Mame Dennis
cameront120 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 02:18 PM   #32
Rivet Master
 
cameront120's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
North Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,422
Images: 23
Aluminum windows use fibre reinforced polyamide as thermal breaks in their construction. In English, fibre reinforced plastic (FRP). Sheets of this material are used as a wall surface in commercial kitchens and healthcare. Perhaps you could try sheets of this material cut down into strips. It would have enough flexibility to follow the curve of the walls but isn't a compressible material.
__________________
Cameron & the Labradors, Kai & Samm
North Vancouver, BC
Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death! - Mame Dennis
cameront120 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 02:36 PM   #33
4 Rivet Member
 
rugjenkins's Avatar
 
1975 Argosy 28
Springville , Alabama
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 424
Both ribs and interior skins. Btw, the hytech ceramics are a fine dust- so I'm not worried about sand paper scuffing. I looked at foam board, prodex, reflectix and such the cast difference for spray foam ran about the same- so for me it was a no brainer. As for the hytech stuff it wasn't cost prohibitive so it's worth a try. I look doing things out of the norm anyway. For me every little improvement helps. My camper is completely reengineered- so let's try something new. That's what makes it fun. Also I've learned that every project planned and executed will usually be done different on the next one😁
__________________
Matt
rugjenkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 05:19 PM   #34
4 Rivet Member
 
rugjenkins's Avatar
 
1975 Argosy 28
Springville , Alabama
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 424
FRP sounds like a good option too. 1 sheet from a box store would do it. Cheap, accessible, easy to use!
__________________
Matt
rugjenkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 05:25 PM   #35
Abe.H
 
RVMS2U's Avatar
 
2002 25' Safari
Ramona , California
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 10
A got to see a airstream with out the inside sheeting, this was a complete restoration, and they came up with the idea of rhino lining walls and ceiling, then, they did all new wiring and insulation went back in the walls, it added a bit of wait, but I was totally blown away by the insulation and sound proofing this trailer had.
Something to think about....
__________________
RVMS2U is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 08:00 PM   #36
Rivet Master
 
robert claus's Avatar
 
2000 19' Bambi
mt. Prospect , Illinois
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 765
Images: 19
I have aluminum frame windows in my house, and there is a thermal break built in that separates the inside of the window from the outside. It is basically a strip of plastic material that acts as an insulator and isolates the cold. It works very well, and I think a thermal break between the inner walls and the ribs would be well worth doing.
__________________
No WD, but a great DW!
robert claus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 08:10 PM   #37
3 Rivet Member
 
timhortons's Avatar
 
2015 16' Sport
Oakville , Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 234
Images: 29
Airstreams as they leave the factory now have a type of blue nylon tape on the exterior ribs to the shell contact. I believe it's meant as both a slight thermal break and to prevent sliding and abrasion of the ribs of the exterior skin for wear and "fit", sqeakiness (NVH).

HofArc, who it is my impression is doing the best airstream Retrofits (so long as you like modern style) had an article saying they had gone to recomending a spray foam hardening lycene insulation with the resulting appearently dramatic increase in both solidity, and insulation value.

https://hofarc.com/7-advantages-to-s...am-insulation/

with the Caveat that money doesn't seem to be a concern for the HofArc customer base, these two seem to be the best practices in insulation retrofits right now.
__________________
timhortons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2016, 12:50 AM   #38
3 Rivet Member
 
Cardinal283's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 202
I've been exploring this idea in my head, researching, and I've read the few threads discussing aerogel. It seems that while several people have discussed this no one has actually done it. I can buy 20ft x 54in x 10mm pieces for $540 (if you know a cheaper source let me know). That's enough to triple layer and cover the center section of the roof. Not the whole curved section. Just the center section that is "flattish". That gives me 30mm or 1.18" thick. I could add one layer of 5mm to bring that to roughly 1.5". At this point I'd be looking at R10-12 vs. R5 Max with fiberglass at the area with the most sun exposure. Probably $1500-$2000 to do the whole top curved sections. Then do the sides and floor in fiberglass or rock wool.

I'm not currently drinking the Prodex Kool Aid even though at one time I was somewhat convinced. Contrary to the anecdotal evidence claimed by some on the forum, the math and physics just don't back it up IMHO. Regardless, I'm not here to discuss that however.
__________________
Cardinal283 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2016, 04:21 PM   #39
Rivet Master
 
Wabbiteer's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
1972 29' Ambassador
St. Paul , Minnesota
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,912
Images: 2
Blog Entries: 2
Quote:
I can buy 20ft x 54in x 10mm pieces for $540 (if you know a cheaper source let me know)
Who is your source?

Cryogel® Z – Pacor, Inc.

The chaff and dust from cutting and working aerogel is crazy, only read of a few installs...
__________________

Wabbiteer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2016, 04:55 PM   #40
3 Rivet Member
 
Cardinal283's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 202
I heard there is a lot of dust. I haven't, however, found anything that gives specifics about what that will entail. There is a second brand, Cabot, that makes an aerogel blanket that is "low dust". Once again no specifics about what that means.

Is the dust only an issue when the blankets are being cut or installed? Will it continue to be an issue after its installed? Is the dust a sign that the blanket is slowly coming apart and deteriorating over time?


I found the blankets through buyaerogel.com. They sell both Angel aerogel and Cabot.
__________________
Cardinal283 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2016, 08:04 PM   #41
Prairie Schooner II
 
Jim Flower's Avatar

 
2012 30' International
1997 25' Safari
1967 20' Globetrotter
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,182
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/hhe/reports...-0026-3230.pdf

The above report contains information pertaining to aerogel that may be of interest to consumers. Jim


Sent from my iPad using Airstream Forums
__________________
Jim
Jim Flower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2016, 09:06 PM   #42
3 Rivet Member
 
Cardinal283's Avatar
 
1963 26' Overlander
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 202
Good idea to use protective equipment during installation.
__________________

__________________
Cardinal283 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
454 TBI, yes/no good/bad idea? bkahler Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 162 06-20-2016 09:00 AM
Total electric. Good idea or bad idea? EZstream Generators & Solar Power 34 08-17-2011 09:40 PM
Is This a Bad Idea? Raptorrider2001 General Repair Forum 14 06-29-2008 01:52 PM
My latest bad idea.... Boondocker Winterizing, Storage, Carports & Covers 3 11-01-2006 09:12 AM
removing interior walls: bad idea? pinkflamingoes General Interior Topics 45 07-14-2004 09:18 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.