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Old 02-11-2018, 08:50 PM   #197
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1966 22' Safari
1955 22' Flying Cloud
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Hank, since you have your renovation on your mind, I have a question. Our door within a door has been polished, hardware removed, and ready to re-insulate. I took some of the interior skins off for templates and replaced with clecos. The door gets awfully flimsy. The door within doesnít conform perfectly to the outer door nor does the entire assembly conform perfectly to the trailer opening. With some of the skin off, does it hurt to tweak the framing a bit for a better fit? Or, will I screw something up? I would appreciate your opinion when time allows. Thanks, Bubba.
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Old 02-13-2018, 02:30 PM   #198
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Originally Posted by Bubba L View Post
Hank, since you have your renovation on your mind, I have a question. Our door within a door has been polished, hardware removed, and ready to re-insulate. I took some of the interior skins off for templates and replaced with clecos. The door gets awfully flimsy. The door within doesnít conform perfectly to the outer door nor does the entire assembly conform perfectly to the trailer opening. With some of the skin off, does it hurt to tweak the framing a bit for a better fit? Or, will I screw something up? I would appreciate your opinion when time allows. Thanks, Bubba.
Bubba, I have rehabbed my door, but I have not addressed the fit of the door to the coach.

Here are some references that I have collected over the years:

1. http://vintageairstream.com/overhauling-the-door/

2. The folks having problems with their door not matching the curvature of the side of the trailer can "recurve" the door very easily. All you need to do is place a piece of wood near the center of the door - near the latch - and push the door closed on the wood gently. Then push the door at the top and the bottom at the same time like you were trying to push it closed with the wood in the way. Push on the door a few times, then check your results. You will be amazed at how easy it is to get the door back to matching the curvature of the trailer after a few tries and moving the wood up and down to get the match as good as you would like it. I have done this on my 1998 34' Limited after the wind caught the door and slammed it open again the stop in the open position and "straightened" the door. I have also used the "fix" for several folks as we travel with caravans over the years. One guy had an appointment at some Airstream dealer in Texas with an estimate of $200 to fix his door. I dug out my piece of 2X4 wood I had used on my door, and we had his door better than it had ever been in 10 minutes - the charge was $0,00 plus saving him a 2.5 hour drive each way to the dealer. Two other rigs came and requested the "fix" before the caravan was over. Joe Scudder 1998 34' Limited FK WBCCI 8624

3. http://www.airforums.com/forums/f480...tml#post678949

I also will email you some useful materials I obtained at the Vintage Trailer Academy.

I hope this helps.

Hank
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:26 PM   #199
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Thanks Hank. This helps a lot. Bubba
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Old 02-15-2018, 07:52 AM   #200
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Thanks Hank. This helps a lot. Bubba
Bubba, I tried to send you an email asking you to email me (so that I could send you some materials). Did you receive it?

Hank
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:36 AM   #201
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Hank, I sent you a PM with my contact information. I donít know what happened to the email I had sent you. I must have screwed something up.
I started measuring up the door yesterday and jotting down dimensions in the event I mess something up. I have some 3003 H14 .032 that is easier to shape. But Kip (Aerowood) suggested I stay with 2024 T3 .032 due to being tougher against denting. Thanks for following up. Bubba
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Old 02-18-2018, 10:03 AM   #202
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Reading about your door brought back memories of my former door work. I had to re-form my GT door twice, first time was with just the frame mounted to get it close. The second time was before I riveted on the inner skin. Both times I had the door or frame mounted to trailer. I used to have to re-skin airliner doors. The only way we could insure a perfect fit was to rig the door to the aircraft and using the aircraft as a jig, with the skin just clecoed on, and then shooting on the skin. A perfect fit every time.
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Old 02-19-2018, 06:12 AM   #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerowood View Post
Reading about your door brought back memories of my former door work. I had to re-form my GT door twice, first time was with just the frame mounted to get it close. The second time was before I riveted on the inner skin. Both times I had the door or frame mounted to trailer. I used to have to re-skin airliner doors. The only way we could insure a perfect fit was to rig the door to the aircraft and using the aircraft as a jig, with the skin just clecoed on, and then shooting on the skin. A perfect fit every time.
I am one of the many Airstream rehabbers who wish they had even a very small bit of the aluminum-working experience that you have!

Thanks for sharing your expertise on the Airforums.

Hank
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Old 02-24-2018, 12:03 PM   #204
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Fantastic Vent install

While Uwe was in Montana I asked him to finish the sealing of the front Fantastic Vent I previously had installed. Uwe did the whole install of the rear FV. Lots of Trempro and SikaFlex sealant around those vents.

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Old 02-26-2018, 07:27 AM   #205
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Originally Posted by RankAm View Post
While Uwe was in Montana I asked him to finish the sealing of the front Fantastic Vent I previously had installed. Uwe did the whole install of the rear FV. Lots of Trempro and SikaFlex sealant around those vents.

Attachment 304870

Hank
I ran out of time to complete the prior post, so I will add some information here.

Uwe advised against using the foam gasket that came with the FV kit. That gasket is known to fail eventually.

I applied lots of Trempro around the base/flange of the FV before I placed it into the opening in the roof. I pressed down on the base to make a good contact with the roof metal (which I had cleaned with carburetor cleaner) and to squeeze out the excess Trempro. Mineral spirits and rags cleaned up the squeeze-out.

To secure that FV base to the roof, use stainless steel sheet metal screws that you hand tighten. It is important (to prevent water leaks) not to over-tighten and strip those screws.

SikaFlex 221 was used to cover each of the screw heads.

Hank
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:07 AM   #206
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Solar panels on roof

I had purchased two Renogy 100 watt panels for installation on the roof.

Uwe (with some minor help from me) installed and wired the two panels.

The wiring from the solar panels needed to pass through the roof and go to the electrical center (I eventually will post about the electrical center below). The two holes through the roof were located to be underneath the forward solar panel. The two openings through the roof were drilled through, a grommet was installed, the solar panel wires were passed through, a stainless steel "clamshell" cover was installed over the opening (with the open end facing to the rear of the coach), and (from the inside of the coach) the hole and cover were filled with Trempro.

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The solar panel attachment brackets were secured to the roof with sheet metal screws. In placing the solar panels, make sure that you leave room for the roof vent cover to open. The process was: (1) use the attachment brackets to mark the locations to drill pilot holes for the stainless steel screws that will secure the brackets to the roof, (2) drill the pilot holes (diameter of the drill bit slightly smaller than the shank of the stainless steel screws to be used), (3) use a hand-held electric drill to drive the screw through the bracket, the roof, and a small backer piece of scrap sheet aluminum that I held in place (from inside the coach) with a piece of scrap wood. The backer piece causes that whole joint to be much tighter because the backer piece is pulled snug against the inside of the roof.

The images show that the two solar panels used up all the space between the front and rear roof vents. This post describes how I previously had covered up the middle roof vent (I do not intend to install a roof air conditioner).

Hank
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:31 AM   #207
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Umbilical cord connection

Uwe likes the heavy-duty umbilical connector hardware made by Pollack.

My umbilical setup will involve (1) a female Pollak connector at the rear of the tow vehicle, (2) a connecting cable with a male fitting on each end, and (3) a female Pollak connector at the front of 8038. He installed the female Pollak connector at the front of the trailer low on the streetside of the flat panel under the front window.

The image below (sorry for the poor focus) shows the junction box on the inside of 8038. The junction box connects the various wires from the umbilical cord and then distributes various wires to 8038.

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Uwe wired and built all the electrical components so that they could be moved around as necessary to fit with the interior build-out. The junction box is free-floating in the image, but eventually I will secure it to the floor or the sidewall of the furniture.

Hank
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Old 03-05-2018, 03:18 PM   #208
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Electrical center

The most important reason for bringing in Uwe was the electrical system. I had no confidence that I could integrate and wire correctly the shore power converter, the 12v control center (with fuses), the inverter, the solar controller, the batteries, the Victron Energy battery monitor, and the shunt (that is used by the battery monitor). I was very intimidated by of those things, and incorrect installation can be dangerous, as the batteries have considerable amps. Uwe's background makes him perfect for those integration tasks. I did some of the simple wiring runs, but Uwe did all the important wiring.

I chose the Boondocker 4 Stage Power Center 60 Amp (BD 1260PC) for my battery charger and 12v electrical control center. Here it is on the bench before Uwe had started:
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Uwe started building the unit on the workbench (after I built a simple box frame on which the Boondocker would sit). The inverter is mounted on the side of the box frame:
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Eventually, I added another surface to the Boondocker box to house the Blue Sky Solar Controller:
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The electrical center will be on the floor under the curbside large window directly across from the curbside entry door:
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I used a step/universal drill bit to cut holes in ribs for grommets through which the wires would pass:
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What a large ratís nest!, and this is not the final wiring:
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This image shows the numbered wires:
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The battery box eventually will be anchored with pocket screws to the floor of the coach (like the battery tray box will be with through the pocket hole screw holes you can see in the image):
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My next post will be on the wiring runs that I made.

Hank
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:32 PM   #209
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I've installed two of the Boondocker converters. They are a nice size and working well for me. I went a purchased a Progressive Dynamics one for my Overlander as it was on sale. They perform the same function. We shall see which one lasts the longest. I expect 30 years out of the thing.

I also need to replace my 115v circuit breaker box (load distribution panel) or whatever it is called. I have done this before too.

But I've never rewired an Airstream like you have. So that makes these component installations a bit more challenging. You have an expert on the job site. Good for you.

I used the old Airstream fuse panel as I thought it was well designed and laid out. It is accessed through the curbside exterior storage compartment.

David
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Old 03-06-2018, 06:21 AM   #210
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I've installed two of the Boondocker converters. They are a nice size and working well for me. I went a purchased a Progressive Dynamics one for my Overlander as it was on sale. They perform the same function. We shall see which one lasts the longest. I expect 30 years out of the thing.

I also need to replace my 115v circuit breaker box (load distribution panel) or whatever it is called. I have done this before too.

But I've never rewired an Airstream like you have. So that makes these component installations a bit more challenging. You have an expert on the job site. Good for you.

I used the old Airstream fuse panel as I thought it was well designed and laid out. It is accessed through the curbside exterior storage compartment.

David
Thanks for your post, David.

I did need an expert, and I had one in Uwe. His experience in electrical systems was just what I needed.

I see that you are in Conifer, CO. I must have driven through there on Hwy 285, as my daughter lives in Evergreen. Very nice part of the state, but I have no memories of Conifer.

Hank
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