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Old 05-07-2019, 12:53 PM   #221
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1956 22' Flying Cloud
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Exterior: Drip Cap above the Curbside Baggage Hatch

The curbside baggage hatch took a lot of my time. I rebuilt the hatch frame and reoriented the door to the hatch. See here.

The hatch and drip cover above the hatch clearly had a hard life. The drip cover had been damaged on more than one occasion, and when I purchased 8038, the drip cover was a painted replacement that was very visible. I was going to install a replacement drip cover (with a shiny finish), but the trailer sidewall above the hatch was full of holes:
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The drip cap would have to cover the entire width of the hatch door, and as you can see in the left of the image above, the drip cap would have to span a joint in the exterior skin aluminum sheets. Uwe advised me to cover all those holes by making a cover patch of sheet aluminum that (1) would cover all of the holes and (2) conform roughly to the shape of the drip cap. To make matters even more challenging, the sheet metal joint required double thickness of the patch to the left of the joint.

I made a cardboard template that followed the shape of the top of the drip cap but was larger than the footprint of the drip cap (so that all the holes in the trailer sidewall would be covered), and I used the template to mark and cut the patch and a smaller piece for the area that required double thickness:
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This is the end result (with lots of Trempro):
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Old 05-07-2019, 12:57 PM   #222
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1956 22' Flying Cloud
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Exterior: Grab Handle at Entry Door

8038 had several holes (in the entry door and in the sidewall of the coach) from a padlock that had been installed by a prior owner:
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I wanted to cover those holes, and installing a grab handle (which I think is good to have anyway) to the right of the door helped accomplish that. I made and riveted a patch to cover the holes in the door, and I also used a patch to cover the holes in the sidewall of 8038. I used this grab handle from VTS. I installed the bottom anchor of the grab handle through the new patch in the sidewall. The top anchor of the grab handle was close to a rivet head, so I used my bench grinder to remove some metal from the grab handle so that the top anchor would fit flush with the sidewall:

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Old 05-07-2019, 01:17 PM   #223
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Interior: Seam Sealer

In the hope of limiting future roof leaks, I applied several coats of Wurth automotive seam sealer to endcap and roof seams:
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:26 PM   #224
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Interior: Opening for Rear Baggage Hatch

I spent much time adding a baggage hatch under the rear escape window. 8038 came with a curbside baggage hatch, but my new bed configuration allowed for a rear baggage hatch. See here.

This is the new rear baggage hatch viewed from inside 8038:
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I had to cut the interior wall piece for the new baggage hatch. I clecoed in place the interior wall piece, and from the outside of 8038 I opened the baggage hatch door so that I could mark the required cutout in the interior wall piece:
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I used snips and a grinder with a cutoff wheel to remove metal for opening through interior wall:
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Unfortunately, I ended up with a not-so-great fit of the interior wall pieces around the new baggage hatch. The ribs and stringers under the rear escape window were extensively rebuilt for the new baggage hatch. The interior wall piece under the escape window was the original metal, but I had cut a hole in it, and I changed the rivet locations for the new baggage hatch. The original install of that interior wall piece seemed to go very well, but that was not to last. As I installed the other interior wall pieces at the rear endcap of 8038, I ended up with a buckling of the wall piece under the rear escape window:
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I had to make some relief cuts and had to re-drill and re-rivet in several locations. It turned out okay, but that was not my finest moment of metal working.

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Old 05-07-2019, 01:32 PM   #225
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Interior: ProDex Insulation

I decided to use ProDex foam insulation for 8038: two layers plus spacers in between to create dead air spaces. HVAC tape at the edge of each piece of Prodex was used to create a closed area of dead air.

A rough, hand-drawn diagram kept track of each area between ribs and stringers, with a separate number for each area and the dimensions:
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I set up a large, flat work space to mark and cut the insulation pieces:
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With two layers, you end up with lots of pieces:
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I was very fortunate that good friends came to the garage for an insulation party to cut and install the ProDex.

The curved endcaps required extra cutting so that what started as a flat piece would conform to the curving endcap. My friend and I would tape a large piece of ProDex to the top of the endcap and then try to form the ProDex to the curve of the endcap. Where it seemed to be necessary, we made relief cuts and removed excess Prodex. We applied two layers of the conformed ProDex:
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:38 PM   #226
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Interior: Gray and Black Tank Vent Stacks

Because 8038 had no holding tanks when I purchased her, I had to install two gray tanks in the belly (see the posts starting here), and there is an above-deck black tank in the streetside wetbath. 8038 did have several original “eyebrow” roof vent covers, and I decided to use them for the holding tank vent stacks.

Black tank vent stack: For the black tank in the wetbath, the roof vent was well positioned. I decided to use “flexible” 1" PVC pipe for the run from the top of the black tank to the eyebrow vent. I found the “flexible” PVC to be not so flexible, so if you use it, be prepared to use elbows to turn corners.

Because of the small diameter of that PVC, I decided to run the pipe between the exterior and interior walls. To make room for the PVC pipe, I had to cut some stringers (carefully, with snips and a grinder with a cutoff wheel, so as not to cut the inside of the exterior skin):
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[Sorry for orientation of photo]

I had to use restraining straps because the pipe wanted to curve and come out of place:
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I used a small 90 degree PVC elbow to exit through the roof under the eyebrow vent cover.

Gray tank vent stack: The two gray tanks located in the belly area will vent on the curbside through an eyebrow vent cover originally used for the heater unit next to the entry door. The vent stack for the two tanks will join above the floor and then will travel under and in cabinetry to the eyebrow vent opening by the door. This work is not yet finished.

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Old 05-07-2019, 01:49 PM   #227
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Interior: Interior Ceiling

Preparing the interior ceiling piece: The large ceiling piece had lots of un-needed holes from the prior cabinet and bulkhead configuration. I wanted to solid-shank rivet any hole that I did not intend to use. It is impossible to drive a solid-shank rivet into the ceiling if it has been installed in the trailer, so my bucking partner and I drove those rivets while the ceiling piece was lying flat on work benches (scooted around to permit access to both sides of the rivet).
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Patch for center ceiling vent: I patched the exterior roof where the center vent had been. See here. I needed to make a patch for the interior ceiling piece and install it with solid-shank rivets (with the ceiling piece flat on work benches):

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Fridge vent hole in ceiling: The fridge vent hole in the interior ceiling had to align with the corresponding hole in the exterior roof. Properly placing the hole in the interior roof piece was a challenge because the interior ceiling piece was lying flat on work benches. I registered off of ribs, stringers, and both exterior and interior rivet holes. I positioned, marked, and then cut the hole in the ceiling while it was lying flat. The straight red line was my registration line based on the location of the exterior and interior rivet holes and the center of the fridge platform. The red oblong line was the outline of the base of the vent, and the green oblong line was my cutline. I gave myself some extra room in case my layout was not quite right:
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Because the hole in the ceiling was oversized, I made a surround trim piece from scrap aluminum sheet. This piece fit snugly to the vent, and it covered the oversized hole in the ceiling piece. This image shows the vent and surround trim after a good bit of caulk and the Zolatone:
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Old 05-07-2019, 01:58 PM   #228
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Interior: Zolatone

Primer first: It is my understanding that Zolatone will not adhere well to all clad aluminum. Because of that, I applied a self-etching primer to all of the interior surfaces that were to be Zolatoned. See here.

To prepare the interior for the Zolatone, all the areas not to be painted (floor, windows, roughed in wiring, etc.) were covered/taped:
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I used a heavy construction-grade paper to cover the subfloor (the wood floor had not been installed) at that time.

Professional painter: I had heard stories about how difficult Zolatone could be, so I hired a painter to apply the Zolatone. He had some trouble getting the spray equipment to work properly, but after some experimenting he resolved that. Because I used a dark color primer but a light color Zolatone, we ran out of Zolatone! I had to order more and have the painter return to finish the spraying. The take-away here is to match the color of the primer to the color of the finish coat so not so much Zolatone is required to cover the primer.

Trim pieces: I decided to paint all the trim, window surrounds, and interior pieces of the entry door separately before they were re-installed in the trailer. I had created a small spray paint booth in the 3d bay of the garage.

After the trim pieces dried, I installed them with pop rivets. The ribs and stringers around some of the windows need to be persuaded to return to the correct position to match up with the surround trim. I used clecos to help get the correct alignment.

Zolatone applied:
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Old 05-07-2019, 02:01 PM   #229
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1956 22' Flying Cloud
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Interior: Installation of Wood Floor

Uwe installed the bamboo flooring with assistance from me. The installation was a “floating” floor that is free to expand and contract without binding on the interior walls. We used spacers to keep the boards away from the trailer walls. We started on the streetside opposite from the entry door, and the going was slow for board runs that required cutouts or holes or that ran into the curving front or rear endcaps. The straight runs were much faster. For each run, Uwe would stop to snug the boards in the run and to snug to the adjacent run of boards. To snug the boards in the run, he would place a spacer at one end of the run and then at the opposite end (using a short piece of flooring) gently pound the pieces to fit snugly.

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The floor is in:
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Old 05-07-2019, 02:07 PM   #230
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Interior: Placement of Appliances

This is an image of the basic layout of the appliances for 8038:
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From right to left: the electrical center, furnace, water heater, and toilet base with above-deck black tank.

This image shows the short “pony wall” in the wetbath. A small sink will sit in the counter above the pony wall.
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Here is an image of the base for the elevated fridge (above the curbside wheel well):
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Old 05-07-2019, 02:21 PM   #231
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Interior: Plumbing

PEX and Sea-Tech: I used PEX for hot and cold piping and Sea-Tech fittings (from Vintage Trailer Supply) (plus a few Sharkebites). The layout for 8038 keeps all fresh water plumbing on the streetside of the cabin. The fresh water tank is under the front window, and the end of each run (hot and cold) is a quick-connect shower sprayer (for a muddy angler or dog) at the rear baggage hatch:
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Upright mount for pump: Uwe mounted the water pump and accumulator upright and off of the floor to save storage space:
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This image shows the fresh water plumbing roughed-in:
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Fresh water fill and tank: I previously rehabbed the original water fill. See here. I also replaced the exterior sheet metal under the front window where the fresh water fill had been. I decided to re-use the water fill, and to prepare for the second life of the water fill:
I shortened the fill shaft:
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I measured (based on the new water tank), marked, and cut a hole in the replacement exterior sheet metal under the front window and installed the exterior fill hardware:
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I made a frame for the fresh water tank. This tank sits on a frame that keeps the tank off the floor of the trailer. I idea is to let air flow around the tank (so that the air can get to any condensation that forms when the tank is filled):
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Attached a flexible hose between the exterior fill and the tank:
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Old 05-07-2019, 03:07 PM   #232
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1956 22' Flying Cloud
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Interior: Rebuild of Entry Door

I disassembled the entry door, and I removed and replated as much of the door hardware as I could. This image shows that re-plated hardware (plus the unpainted pop rivets used to attach the sheet aluminum door pieces):
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I began to install the VTS deadbolt, but Uwe thought that the shaft of the bolt was too large such that the required hole in the door frame to receive the bolt would be too large and would weaken the frame. Uwe suggests that I cut down the diameter of the bolt shaft so that a smaller hole will be required in the door frame. I have yet to make those changes.

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Old 05-07-2019, 03:29 PM   #233
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Interior: Building Bulkheads

I concluded that the interior buildout was beyond my abilities, and I decided to rely on Uwe to get the buildout started. The quality of the work that is covered by cabinetry, etc., doesn't need to look great, but I want the interior bulkheads and cabinetry to look like a professional's work.

Hickory for interior. I decided to use hickory for the interior cabinetry and bulkheads. It turns out that ½" hickory plywood is hard to find with a wood core. Uwe advised against MDF core plywood because it does not travel well. I eventually found wood core ½" plywood in Wyoming, but I was very disappointed in its quality, and we had to navigate around blemishes and filled spots in building bulkheads.

Curbside build. For the buildout on the curbside, the starting point was the platform for the elevated fridge. The fridge has to be properly located relative to the sidewall fresh air vent and the roof vent for hot air. Accordingly, Uwe started by building the two bulkheads that enclose the fridge area.

During my demolition of 8038, I saved all of the original bulkheads, and I think that was helpful to Uwe. Although I do not know enough to fully describe the process that he used, he began the process by making a template that started as an original bulkhead, an oversized piece of hardboard, or other lightweight scrap. He would take the template into the trailer where it was to fit. Over a number of times, he would fit, scribe, cut, sand, etc., until the template was a good fit. One of the problems is that the curves of the ceiling and walls are not uniform, and each bulkhead had to be custom fit.

After Uwe was satisfied with the template, the template would be used to mark and cut the hickory plywood bulkhead to be installed in the cabin. The plywood piece also would be slightly oversized so that he could trim it to a good fit.

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The process required care and time, plus a very good eye to determine where and how much material to remove. This was very highly skilled work by Uwe.

Streetside build. The buildout on the streetside was controlled by the wetbath black tank enclosure. We first placed and secured the black tank plumbing, black tank enclosure, toilet, and wetbath walls. The most difficult of all bulkheads was at the rear of the wetbath. The top of this rear bulkhead was within the rear endcap of 8038, and that meant that the top had to (1) conform to the kind-of-flat segments of the endcap and (2) be beveled towards the rear of 8038 because the ceiling height was diminishing. That bulkhead piece took even Uwe many fittings, scribing, cutting, etc., before he was satisfied.

Face frames. As Uwe was finishing his time with me, he made a face frame so that I could have a sample and learn how to make other fame frames. A face frame connects (and serves as a front wall to) adjacent bulkheads. A face frame considerably strengthens and anchors the bulkheads to which it attaches. Uwe likes to use Kreg pocket screws for joinery, and I have Kreg hardware in my Montana shop. In this image, you can see the back side of the face frame with the Kreg pocket screw holes:
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You can see in the image above that Uwe was holding the belt sander at an angle because the curve of the ceiling required a slight bevel to the face frame. Uwe likes to have ventilation holes at the top of each face frame.

These images show how the face frame fits:
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Old 05-07-2019, 03:44 PM   #234
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Okay, this is closure

This post will bring to a close my contributions to this thread.

The restoration road is a long and difficult path, but it also can be great fun and very rewarding. I set out to learn new skills, and my progress to date has taught me many new skills.

I received a large amount of help along the way from my friends, and I am very grateful for all that they did to move the process forward. Van, your help was amazing and beyond what anyone could expect. I am deeply indebted to you for your many hours of assistance.

Although I did not finish my renovation without professional help, 8038 has come a long way, and in many ways I am very much satisfied about this very time-consuming process of working on 8038.

When I get 8038 road-worthy (which will be no sooner than 2020 because I cannot work on 8038 in 2019), I will post in another thread, so this is good-bye within this thread.

I hope that other rank amateurs will not be scared off from a renovation because of my experiences. An Airstream renovation is great fun.

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Old 05-08-2019, 06:46 AM   #235
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Not Defeat...

Thomas Edison:

"I have not failed! I just found 10,000 ways that won't work."

Thanks for the end post...I am just a little behind you in my work and believe me when I say your posts have truly helped. If I could find a Uwe I would of used him a lot.
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:57 PM   #236
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Thank you kindly for the excellent documentation of your project to date. It will be helpful to others as it was helpful to me.

Good luck with your work this year.

David
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