Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-21-2012, 03:33 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
DanielB's Avatar
 
1974 31' Excella 500
Charleston , South Carolina
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,073
Blog Entries: 8
Condensation on my ribs

Work-camping.. working on trailer while I camp in it. Have insulation in... spacers glued in, Prodex, Sheathing, blow in to seal cracks.

What I see now in the mornings is some pretty serious condensation (not using heater or AC) in the mornings on the (exposed) ribs. This is not just a film of water, but actual drops of water on the ribs.

The next thing I'll be doing is putting new aluminum sheets on the interior.

The question is.. any way(s) to mitigate this moisture issue? I was thinking of using strips of wide rubber type electrical tape on the surface of the ribs prior to installing the aluminum sheets. Not sure what effect that might have.

Any suggestions on dealing with this condensation?
__________________

__________________
As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what they do.
- Andrew Carnegie
DanielB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2012, 04:22 PM   #2
Rivet Master<br><img src="/ugala/forums/images/5rivet.gif">
 
CanoeStream's Avatar

 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
St. Cloud , Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 13,279
Images: 19
Blog Entries: 3
Seems that you have elevated humidity inside the trailer, built up either from breathing during the night (options anyone? ulp!) or cooking. Even my '74 Argosy had a foam tape between the ribs and inner skin. We probably can say all Airstreams have this same thermal break for the last [??] years.

There are only a few better conductors than aluminum (gold for instance). Outside morning chill soaks right in to the back side of that R-0.nada thermal tape. Enough cold makes it across to the inner skin to chill that inner surface below the dewpoint. Hence the condensation.

I've seen this a lot in our early spring and late fall camping and long ago have resorted to leaving a window ajar at the other end of the trailer from where we sleep (or a Fantastic Fan slightly open). This brings an air exchange and lessening of the interior humidity. I accept the bit of extra LP used to compensate. The thermostat is at the bed end of the trailer; I lower the set temp so the furnace is not firing all the time while we sleep (55-58 F seems to work well). This works very well to reduce window and rib condensation. I'll modify the window method slightly when it is windy out.
__________________

__________________
Bob

5 meter Langford Nahanni

CanoeStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2012, 06:20 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
DanielB's Avatar
 
1974 31' Excella 500
Charleston , South Carolina
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,073
Blog Entries: 8
Interesting. Humidity inside the trailer. I've seen this sleeping in a closed up tent.. the inside roof becomes soaked from breathing all night.

That makes perfect sense. Condensed water is already inside the trailer before it condenses.

I live in a high humidity area anyway so will get serious about keeping the humidity down.

Thanks
__________________
As I grow older, I pay less attention to what men say. I just watch what they do.
- Andrew Carnegie
DanielB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.