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Old 07-23-2007, 10:41 PM   #1
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Best Fire Extinguisher and placement

Given the situations that have arisen in the past while, the latest being Peegreen's family's loss, I'm wondering what I should be doing for fire extinguishers for my trailer. I have two now, one tiny little thing that comes in a wall pocket that just MIGHT put out a lit match if I help by blowing on it at the same time, and another large home use one at the back near the beds. This is large enough that it would also be used to smash the windows out for our escape if necessary (egad, I'd better lose some weight - I'm sure I could fit through those window holes when we bought the trailer).

After reading these horror stories though I'm rethinking the type and sizes I should have, and also where they are located. I would appreciate your suggestions and cautions.

I did a search but did not find any specific thread related to the extinguishers. I'll be out on Saturday buying more and I want to get the right type and size extinguisher for our safety.

Also, smoke detectors. Same questions, what are you using, hard wired or separate battery? Do you find that bopping down the road causes the batteries to come loose? Do you check it after every set up? I haven't been (oops).

Barry
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Old 07-23-2007, 11:06 PM   #2
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I have the factory 5BC rated provided one by the door. Not very useful for much more than a small grease fire. I put a 3A, 40BC unit behind the toilet. I also carry the same unit in the truck.
Smoke detector: factory supplied in the "living room".
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Old 07-24-2007, 05:10 AM   #3
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http://www.airforums.com/forums/f408...ers-34515.html Check out what firedog has recommended.
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Old 07-24-2007, 06:13 AM   #4
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All You Ever Wanted to Know
About Fire Extinguishers . . .

There are basically four different types or classes of fire extinguishers, each of which extinguishes specific types of fire. Newer fire extinguishers use a picture/labeling system to designate which types of fires they are to be used on. Older fire extinguishers are labeled with colored geometrical shapes with letter designations. Both of these types of labels are shown below with the description of the different classes of extinguishers.

Additionally, Class A and Class B fire extinguishers have a numerical rating which is based on tests conducted by Underwriter’s Laboratories that are designed to determine the extinguishing potential for each size and type of extinguisher. Click on any of the topics listed below for additional information that may be helpful to know.

Fire Extinguisher Ratings

Class A Extinguishers will put out fires in ordinary combustibles, such as wood and paper. The numerical rating for this class of fire extinguisher refers to the amount of water the fire extinguisher holds and the amount of fire it will extinguish.

Class B Extinguishers should be used on fires involving flammable liquids, such as grease, gasoline, oil, etc. The numerical rating for this class of fire extinguisher states the approximate number of square feet of a flammable liquid fire that a non-expert person can expect to extinguish.

Class C Extinguishers are suitable for use on electrically energized fires. This class of fire extinguishers does not have a numerical rating. The presence of the letter “C” indicates that the extinguishing agent is non-conductive.

Class D Extinguishers are designed for use on flammable metals and are often specific for the type of metal in question. There is no picture designator for Class D extinguishers. These extinguishers generally have no rating nor are they given a multi-purpose rating for use on other types of fires.



Multi-Class Ratings



Many extinguishers available today can be used on different types of fires and will be labeled with more than one designator, e.g. A-B, B-C, or A-B-C. Make sure that if you have a multi-purpose extinguisher it is properly labeled. This is the old style of labeling indicating suitability for use on Class A, B, and C fires.




This is the new style of labeling that shows this extinguisher may be used on Ordinary Combustibles, Flammable Liquids, or Electrical Equipment fires. This is the new labeling style with a diagonal red line drawn through the picture to indicate what type of fire this extinguisher is NOT suitable for. In this example, the fire extinguisher could be used on Ordinary Combustibles and Flammable Liquids fires, but not for Electrical Equipment fires.



Types of Fire Extinguishers

Dry Chemical extinguishers are usually rated for multiple purpose use. They contain an extinguishing agent and use a compressed, non-flammable gas as a propellant.

Halon extinguishers contain a gas that interrupts the chemical reaction that takes place when fuels burn. These types of extinguishers are often used to protect valuable electrical equipment since them leave no residue to clean up. Halon extinguishers have a limited range, usually 4 to 6 feet. The initial application of Halon should be made at the base of the fire, even after the flames have been extinguished.

Water These extinguishers contain water and compressed gas and should only be used on Class A (ordinary combustibles) fires.

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) extinguishers are most effective on Class B and C (liquids and electrical) fires. Since the gas disperses quickly, these extinguishers are only effective from 3 to 8 feet. The carbon dioxide is stored as a compressed liquid in the extinguisher; as it expands, it cools the surrounding air. The cooling will often cause ice to form around the “horn” where the gas is expelled from the extinguisher. Since the fire could re-ignite, continue to apply the agent even after the fire appears to be out.



How to Use a Fire Extinguisher

Even though extinguishers come in a number of shapes and sizes, they all operate in a similar manner. Here's an easy acronym for fire extinguisher use:
P A S S -- Pull, Aim, Squeeze, and Sweep



Pull the pin at the top of the extinguisher that keeps the handle from being accidentally pressed.



Aim the nozzle toward the base of the fire.



Stand approximately 8 feet away from the fire and squeeze the handle to discharge the extinguisher. If you release the handle, the discharge will stop.



Sweep the nozzle back and forth at the base of the fire. After the fire appears to be out, watch it carefully since it may re-ignite!

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Old 07-24-2007, 06:28 AM   #5
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Thanks, Michelle, that is info everyone should have, and know. We've had a couple of "fire drills". This helps everyone know what to do, and probably should be conducted yearly, at the same time we repack the wheel bearings, change the batteries in the smoke alarm, etc.
We have a 10 pound ABC extinguisher that I keep in the bathroom, smoke alarm moved to the bedroom area (away from the stove, the smoke alarm telling us supper was ready got old fast), a 2 pound BC extinguisher by the door, and a Halon extinguisher in the truck. The Halon extinguisher is pretty cool, it works by taking O2 out of the air, so basically toss it in the door, and close it.
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Old 07-24-2007, 07:15 AM   #6
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I put my extinguisher by the door.

In buildings, I have heard it said that you never want to have to go into a burning building to get an extinguisher-put them by the exits.

I like that. That way, in an emergency, I could evacuate to the door, but grab an extinguisher if I decide to turn back and fight the fire. If it gets out of control, I am between the door and the fire and can go out.

Also, if I come back to an empty trailer and discover a fire, I have the extinguisher handy if I decide to try to enter and fight it. Also handy if I need it for outside (my vehicle or a neighbor for example).

Just thoughts... I had a house fire (lightning) once and was glad I did have extinguishers. I hope and pray never to need my smoke detector, carbon monoxide detector, fire extinguishers, break-away switch, first aid kit, plunger (oops, that's in the house) but I have them just in case.
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Old 07-24-2007, 09:16 AM   #7
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tried to access peegreen's listed thread and was denied entry. anyone else on the bad boy list?
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Old 07-24-2007, 09:27 AM   #8
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I only carry Halon in the airplane. Too expesive for anything else.
Dry chemical make one big mess in a confined space, Sticks to everything (speaking from experience) and the powder is corrosive.
Halon is heavier than air which will displace it. Halon is no fun to breathe. (Speaking from experience)
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Old 07-24-2007, 09:57 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottW
tried to access peegreen's listed thread and was denied entry. anyone else on the bad boy list?
Me too. It's okay, I've been disappointed before though.

Barry
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Old 07-24-2007, 11:23 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by safari57
Me too. It's okay, I've been disappointed before though.

Barry
I think this might be because the link he provided is a link to the private NEU forum.
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Old 07-24-2007, 03:36 PM   #11
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I put mine by the door. I placed it so if necessary I can reach it from outside through the open door without actually getting into the coach. I figured the extinguisher should be somewhere on my way out and between me and the fire. Good point made here about one in the rear should you have a fire between you and that door. Also it could punch out the window should the emergency become that bad.

Neil and Lynn.
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Old 07-24-2007, 04:01 PM   #12
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Abc...

The easiest way to remember the fire extinguisher codes are: "A" fires are ones that leave an ash (wood, paper, etc), "B" fires are ones contained in a bottle (oil, fuel, etc) and "C" fires are related to circuits (electrical).
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Old 07-24-2007, 05:11 PM   #13
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Correction

This is a copy of the post from Firedog - sorry I didn't realize it was in the private forums section as the post's name is not in the standardized syntax - too bad because this thread is applicable to all. .................................................. .................................................. .............. In response to Pam Questions, I bought 2 Co-2 fire Extinguishers today, in pic one on the left is a 5 lb, and right is a 15 lb.You can extinguish a propane fire or electical fire without any powder residue from a dry chemical unit. price was $225.00 good for 6 years then should refill and recharge,if not used.I hope this helps, all who are concerned about fire safety.
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Old 07-24-2007, 08:06 PM   #14
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The dry chemical have an advantage over the CO2. CO2 disapates quickly. Dry chemical stays around and helps keep the fire from re-igniting.
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