Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-06-2015, 10:11 AM   #15
Rivet Master
 
Boxite's Avatar

 
2008 22' Sport
Spicewood (W of Austin) , Texas
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin245 View Post
A presumptuous statement. Many SOB's are clad in 0.040" aluminum or fiberglass. No easy task.
Presumptuous...much like your own. I have personally done this (kicked thru a SOB wall and passed thru it. It was constructed of thin plyboard, fiberglas insulation, and covered in sheet-aluminum which tore easily from the wall.) Fortunately it was in a scrap yard and we were simply fooling around and not an actual fire.

The escape scenario most often imagined fails to consider the need to actually pass THROUGH the escape hatch and onto the ground below. The maneuver will be very intimidating despite the need, and significant injury can occur from the fall to the ground.
If you're like me, past middle-age and overweight... and if you have never actually attempted to pass thru your RV Emer-Exit... you will be poorly prepared to actually accomplish the task despite your motivation.
It might be good to consider what is immediately OUTSIDE your Emer-Exit window when you park that thing. Tree's blocking it? Parked vehicle? Ajoining building?
An escape window is useless without preparation. Just sayin'...
__________________

__________________
Boxite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2015, 11:12 AM   #16
3 Rivet Member
 
MyNancy1977's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 140
Lol I know boxite , that's what I was thinking so now I'm coming up with an idea.
__________________

__________________
MyNancy1977 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2015, 11:45 AM   #17
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxite View Post
The maneuver will be very intimidating despite the need, and significant injury can occur from the fall to the ground.
Even if you end up with broken bones, bruises, and cuts on the way out, it's still better than staying inside where the fire is. Given a choice between being injured in a bad escape and being killed by not escaping, I know which one I'll choose. Burning to death is a horrid way to die.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 02:06 AM   #18
Rivet Master
 
Boxite's Avatar

 
2008 22' Sport
Spicewood (W of Austin) , Texas
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyNancy1977 View Post
Lol I know boxite , that's what I was thinking so now I'm coming up with an idea.
Yeah... I'll bet I know what you're thinking.... me too!
__________________
Boxite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 08:27 AM   #19
2 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
2001 36' Land Yacht XC Diesel 300 hp w/slide
Woodbury , New Jersey
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 82
Before buying a Halon fire extinguisher, take a look at
Questions and Answers on Halons and Their Substitutes | Alternatives / SNAP | US EPA
__________________
windfallsp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 10:34 AM   #20
4 Rivet Member
 
Nomad518's Avatar
 
2001 25' Safari
Vancouver , Washington
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 264
The owner's manual that came with our AS when it was new in 2001 recommends opening the rear window regularly (this is our emergency escape hatch) to make sure it operates properly. We do this when we're camping to enjoy the view from the rear of our trailer and to allow fresh air breezes to flow through. I've noticed that the seals around the window do get a little bit sticky sometimes, so the advice given in the manual is good. Know where your escape window is and open it regularly to make sure it's working properly (doing this also gives you the practice needed so that you're familiar with the process in an emergency).

Another good idea is to upgrade your fire extinguisher. Ours came with a small extinguisher that was mounted on the side of a cabinet just inside the door. I never gave it much thought and never had to use it (fortunately), but last year I replaced it with a much larger extinguisher that's rechargeable. I still hope that I never have to use it, but at least I know it's relatively fresh and more capable than the original.
__________________
Nomad518 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 11:55 AM   #21
Moderator
 
jcanavera's Avatar

 
2004 30' Classic Slideout
Fenton , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 9,002
Images: 143
Send a message via AIM to jcanavera Send a message via Skype™ to jcanavera
Supposedly fire extinguishers go bad to the compounds used to smother a fire, consolidating and solidifying in the extinguisher. They need to be removed from their holders and shaken every once in a while to keep things from solidifying. For many who travel a lot, the movement of the trailer provides the shake. If you use the trailer infrequently, it probably wouldn't hurt to replace the extinguisher. Another thought would be to rap the bottom of the extinguisher with a rubber mallet. That will definitely move the contents around. After 10 years of ownership, I think it may be time to replace ours. The trailer has sat in storage since September of last year. So with our first outing in early June, the trailer will have sat for 8 months. With Patty's poor health the last 15 months, the trailer has only been out on the road once. We are hoping soon to get out of the doldrums and get out more this year.

Jack
__________________
Jack Canavera
STL Mo.
AIR #56
'04 Classic 30' S.O.,'03 GMC Savana 2500,'14 Honda CTX 700
jcanavera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 12:17 PM   #22
Rivet Master
 
prairieschooner's Avatar
 
1958 18' "Footer"
Idyllwild , California
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 516
Great advice so far from my opinion.
1) Alarms & Detectors...Smoke Alarm mounted high where it will detect the smoke easily. Carbon Monoxide Detector...mounted lower, I chose to mount ours at about the same level as we sleep. LPG Detector mounted lower to detect a leak.
2) Escape...have an Escape Plan. On our '58 we could simply open the Rear Window, Remove the Screen and get out. I have a Rope Ladder (Rope with Wooden Rungs) that I can deploy to keep from breaking bones. Pretty easy to make with a larger piece at the top to keep it from falling through the window.
3) Fire Fighting...could exchange 2 & 3 but Portable Fire Extinguishers mounted in readily accessible locations. These extinguishers use the same basic approach, the removal of oxygen so caution should be used when discharging one in an enclosed area. They should be serviced regularly and have a Gauge to help identify one that needs service (the power does compress on a Dry Chemical from normal vibration, it has been suggested that you turn it upside down and tap on the bottom with a plastic hammer to help dislodge the compacted powder and then check the gauge to be sure it is still fully charged.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	973730.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	55.3 KB
ID:	237956  
__________________
Steve
1958 California Built 18' #18-4092
http://www.airforums.com/forums/f106...on-122678.html
prairieschooner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 01:42 PM   #23
Rivet Master
 
Boxite's Avatar

 
2008 22' Sport
Spicewood (W of Austin) , Texas
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
Even if you end up with broken bones, bruises, and cuts on the way out, it's still better than staying inside where the fire is. Given a choice between being injured in a bad escape and being killed by not escaping, I know which one I'll choose. Burning to death is a horrid way to die.
(Quoted for the purpose of focusing the attention, not to challenge any individual)

The trailer is aflame... do you LEAD? or FOLLOW others thru the escape exit?

Have you ever actually participated in a realistic fire-drill in which you, along with others, have demonstrated how to exit a confined space thru a restricted exit?

Have you and your family practiced the maneuver?

If not, then you have a poor chance of success.
__________________
Boxite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 01:52 PM   #24
Lost in America
 
mojo's Avatar
 
2015 27' FB International
2006 25' Safari FB SE
2004 19' International CCD
Oak Creek , Arizona
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,506
Airstream provides a fire extinguisher, usually in the dining area at the door end of the trailer. It is wise to add another at the bedroom end of the trailer in case flames prevent you from getting to the other end.

And yes, I have tried the escape window, unfortunately climbing into the trailer to retrieve keys locked inside!
__________________
This is the strangest life I've ever known - J. Morrison

The Nest Egg - 2015 Airstream International Serenity 27FB
Silverado 2500HD Chevy Duramax Diesel

mojo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 02:16 PM   #25
Rivet Master
 
1974 31' Sovereign
1979 23' Safari
Wayland , New York
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,627
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by AWCHIEF View Post
We carried these in Naval Aircraft to expedite egress from aircraft in case of an emergency. Would they work in an Airstream? I would certainly not be presumptuous and say that it positively would.
Now I get the AWCHIEF - AW Chief, BZ
__________________
HiJoeSilver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 04:05 PM   #26
Winemaker
 
rgwatkin's Avatar
 
2012 28' Flying Cloud
Avila Beach , California
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 150
Images: 2
Also be aware that the rear window escapes are rendered unusable if you have a Fiamma bike rack installed with bikes on. It's a pain but when camping I make a point of removing my bikes just in case of fire or intruder.
__________________
rgwatkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 05:17 PM   #27
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Sioux Falls , South Dakota
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 843
One of the big advantages of an Airstream (at least in my mind) is that it is closer to the ground than almost any other RV. I haven't tried escaping from an Airstream or any other RV, but we do know how to get windows open to bail out of each of the two most recent RV's we've owned. We'll do the same with the next coach.
__________________
David Lininger, kb0zke
TAC SD-6
AIR 54240
Heartland mpg 181 (sold)
1993 Foretravel U300 (for sale)
kb0zke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2015, 05:38 PM   #28
Moderator
 
Kevin245's Avatar

 
Vintage Kin Owner
... , ...
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,390
Images: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxite View Post
Presumptuous...much like your own. I have personally done this (kicked thru a SOB wall and passed thru it. It was constructed of thin plyboard, fiberglas insulation, and covered in sheet-aluminum which tore easily from the wall.) Fortunately it was in a scrap yard and we were simply fooling around and not an actual fire.
Not presumptuous on my part. You just lump SOB’s into your post and base your view on a single limited event? Not all rigs are built the same way and to broadly throw anything not Airstream under the bus based on a one time “fooling around” episode reveals either a lack of knowledge of just how well some RV’s are constructed, or indifference to anything non Airstream.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxite View Post
Let's put it this way.... you're not gonna simply kick-out the walls to escape from a fire like you can the SOB's.
Low end RV’s tend to be cheaply constructed with thin hardboard interior panels, wood frame superstructure walls and roofs, and thin aluminum or fiberglass siding. Most are stapled together and I think a full grown man could punch or kick his way through a wall constructed in this manner given the proper motivation.

Higher end RV’s are typically constructed with plywood interior wall panels, welded aluminum, or steel superstructure frames and roofs, and 0.125 inch (or thicker) fiberglass, or 0.040 inch aluminum skins which are riveted or bonded to the frame. More robust than my Airstream and a man will not punch or kick his way through without the aid of an axe, chainsaw, etc.

The key to any emergency is planning, but planning does no good without practice. When adrenaline kicks in we depend on training to know what we should do in a given situation, and practice to develop muscle memory so that reactions become instinctive when seconds really count.
__________________

__________________

"You wouldn't worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do."

Eleanor Roosevelt

Kevin245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New NT-30SP fires 10 sec. then goes out, fan on fotochop Furnaces, Heaters, Fireplaces & Air Conditioning 3 01-06-2009 08:04 PM
Dometic Refrigerator Fires? Cracker Refrigerators 89 07-27-2008 05:59 PM
Florida Fires Devoman Off Topic Forum 8 05-16-2007 07:16 AM
RVers at Western Wild Fires - California Streamer1 On The Road... 2 10-27-2006 11:07 AM
Temecula (Corona) California Fires Cat Off Topic Forum 3 05-08-2004 11:56 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.