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Old 11-29-2015, 07:46 AM   #57
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My original marathons have 21000 miles on them and are at 50 per cent .I do check the air every time we get ready for a road trip, I have rubbed and massaged them looking for lumps and irregularities, above all I do not drive over curbs ,even going over some steep drive ways at an angle you can be putting all the weight on one wheel with this type of suspension, it does not equalize like the springs do, the new 16" michelins will go on this winter , they will be treated the same way, as I don't want any damage to my trailer..
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Old 11-29-2015, 09:06 AM   #58
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You don't have to hit curbs or potholes for Marathons to fail.
They give no warning. At home, they appear in good condition. 30 miles later...
You are wise to get no tires.


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Old 11-29-2015, 12:04 PM   #59
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Are Marathons time or millage limited? Originals are possibly 2 years old. We believe they have about 20K on them. They show generally as new with no wear. We will replace them with 15s, the question is when? Now, or after this year's travels? Most folks seem to say they have 3-4 years service at a minimum. The exceptions are the folks who say they have had new tires fail on their first trip, which sounds like a manufacturing defect or bad road hazard damage. Does good initial service indicate proper manufacture, a couple years off normal GM life, or just a couple of lucky spins of cylinder on the GM roulette wheel? And thank you all for posting your experience and upgrade solutions. Pat
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Old 11-29-2015, 12:19 PM   #60
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I don't think you can put a definitive life for any tire. GMY's have a history. It seems they are good until they " are not". I took mine off after 3 yrs. they looked fine as far as tread wear goes. One had begun to separate on the inside of the tire where I couldn't easily see it. I'm one of the lucky ones.
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Old 11-29-2015, 12:21 PM   #61
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I keep hearing that GYMs are bad but I've always run GYMs on my '94 bass boat trailer. I've had 1 blowout on a 14 year old tire. My AS runs GYMs, original owner put 4 new ones on before he sold it to the guy who sold it to me. He had it for 2 years before selling it to me. Again, no problems while I've had them. I always check the pressure, store them on wood planks, make sure I exercise them by taking the AS out of storage to warm the tires on a 50 mile round trip. I cover them with tire covers.

I know this is anecdotal evidence but as long as a product gives me good service I'm going to stick with it and GYMs have not given me any reason to switch. Good Year is a good company, makes a good product. I'm happy.
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Old 11-29-2015, 02:31 PM   #62
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Very strange but looking at the photo it appears the tire was place into the back of the car (floor mat in the passenger compartment). Can't imagine the reaction/destruction/carnage if it had blown while the car was driving to someplace to have the tire checked...
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Old 11-30-2015, 05:45 AM   #63
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Trailer tires in general seem to last only 3-4 years before tread separation. I have never had a tread separation on P-rated or LT tires, which seem to last 5-7 years before they dry-rot/begin to crack ob the sidewalls. This is my reason for the switch to LT tires and 16" wheels.
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Old 11-30-2015, 06:36 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PKI View Post
Are Marathons time or millage limited? Originals are possibly 2 years old. We believe they have about 20K on them. They show generally as new with no wear. We will replace them with 15s, the question is when? Now, or after this year's travels? Most folks seem to say they have 3-4 years service at a minimum. The exceptions are the folks who say they have had new tires fail on their first trip, which sounds like a manufacturing defect or bad road hazard damage. Does good initial service indicate proper manufacture, a couple years off normal GM life, or just a couple of lucky spins of cylinder on the GM roulette wheel? And thank you all for posting your experience and upgrade solutions. Pat
I blame the engineers of the cheap tires.
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Old 11-30-2015, 07:56 AM   #65
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There is an extensive and interesting article at the Modern Tire Dealer site:
Service trailer tires - Commercial Business - Modern Tire Dealer
Overloading seems to be a prime cause of failures. It's very good reading if you have a few minutes

Here is a paragraph on the difference among ST, P and LT tires:
ST vs. P vs. LT: How trailer tires are different
Passenger tires are not built for the higher load requirements, duty cycles and special demands of trailering, according to Carlisle Transportation Products. The company describes the differences between special trailer (ST), and passenger (P) and light truck (LT) tires:
  • Polyester cords in an ST tire are bigger than in a comparable P or LT tire.
  • Steel cords used in ST tires have a larger diameter and greater tensile strength to meet additional load requirements.
  • ST tire rubber compounds contain chemicals to resist weather and ozone cracking, particularly conditions resulting from extended storage and the unusual duty cycles of trailer tires.
  • The slightly shallower tread depth of a trailer tire reduces sway and rides cooler, which adds to tire longevity.
  • ST tires generally offer approximately 10% more load capacity than a similar LT tire and nearly 40% more than a P tire.
  • ST tires feature stiffer sidewalls, especially in the lower section, which:
    • reduce sidewall flexing causing the trailer to track straighter
    • diminish the risk of trailer sway, and
    • lessen the risk of sidewall puncture and blowout.
Trailer tire facts for your customers

  • Trailer tires must endure more demanding conditions than passenger or LT tires.
  • Tread does not indicate when a trailer tire wears out. Because a trailer tire is used less often than a car, age, not mileage, determines when it needs to be replaced.
  • Overloading is a major cause of trailer tire failure. The actual weight of the load is everything under tow, including gear, food, water, equipment, toys, and the trailer.
  • Proper air pressure keeps the sidewall stiff for straight tracking behind the tow vehicle. An underinflated trailer tire may not sag due to its stiffer sidewalls.
There is a lot more information in the article.
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:14 AM   #66
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Did I miss the posting of pictures of the interior of the tire at the location of the bubble? or the official engineering response from GY on reason for the bubble?
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Old 11-30-2015, 11:31 AM   #67
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Yeah.. This is why my "ST" tires from Towmaster failed... And of the 6, they were all deemed "manufacturing defect" by the Manufacturer! Yes, I paid to Send All 6 back for review and they deemed
"Defective!!!"

6 defective out of 6. How unusual.
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Old 11-30-2015, 12:18 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m.hony View Post
Trailer tires in general seem to last only 3-4 years before tread separation. I have never had a tread separation on P-rated or LT tires, which seem to last 5-7 years before they dry-rot/begin to crack ob the sidewalls. This is my reason for the switch to LT tires and 16" wheels.
Were you using those "P" and "LT" rated tires on a 30" dual axle trailer?

Here is a really great tire info site. RV Tire Safety: Flex Failure

I believe most separation problems occur from under inflation and higher speeds than anything else. multi-axle trailers add considerably more stress when turning as well. which will add to separation failures.

I am interested in the LT change, to see if there is a significant difference in separation issues and other failures. Especially when under inflated.

However I think it will be hard to quantify due to the inflation, mileage, UV, singe vs multi-axle, Loads, road conditions, etc. and other usage factors on each persons particular trailer.

Another great thread.

-Dennis
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Old 11-30-2015, 01:44 PM   #69
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I have always used P-rated tires on my ancient 5' x 10' utility trailer. Never an issue.
Yes, I have LT tires on my 30' Classic.
My two-time experience with ST tires is that the are inferior garbage.
I will not have a 3rd ST tire incident.
We have about (25) 14,000# GVW cargo trailers at work with 16" wheels/LT tires.
If many forum users, Airstream corporate, and the very smart men who own the company I work for have jumped on the 16" wheel/LT tire bandwagon, there must be a reason why.
My money will never buy ST tires- unless I buy a huge fifth wheel with Load Range H tires-
On my previous trailer, I upgraded from Load Range D to Load Range E, but then traded the trailer after a couple of months with the new tires, so I'll never know if the tires were any better. I could have done that with this trailer, but why would I?


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Old 12-01-2015, 07:03 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwf View Post
Yeah.. This is why my "ST" tires from Towmaster failed... And of the 6, they were all deemed "manufacturing defect" by the Manufacturer! Yes, I paid to Send All 6 back for review and they deemed
"Defective!!!"

6 defective out of 6. How unusual.
I hope Tireman9 will back me up on this, as we both worked for a tire manufacturer (albeit different ones!), but NO tire manufacturer is going to admit to a "manufacturing defect". Not only does that open them to many forms of legal liability, but they don't actually phrase such things in that way.

Further, in the area of travel trailers, it is sooooo common for these to be under tired (tires too small) that I can not image any legal savvy tire engineer writing a letter and not pointing this out.

I doubt very much this happened.
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