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Old 05-22-2006, 09:49 PM   #1
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Under pressure

I've searched under "air pressure" and after 40 minutes still have not answered the question...

The side wall says 65 psi max, and the plate on the trailer says 55psi.

I split it at 60 psi but should I ?

Michael
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Old 05-22-2006, 10:09 PM   #2
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I run as close as possible to what is on the sidewall. My trailer is a 29' and about the same weight as yours. I do not want an underinflated tire to wear the outside edges faster than the centerline. Your trailer will weigh out at 6500-7000lbs and with a turbo diesel doing the pulling, your rig is capable of putting a real load on the tires. Underinflation translates to higher operating temperature due to sidewall flex.

The tire manufacturer is the final authority. Airstream shouldn't even be in the picture. Granted, if the sidewall rating is 2540lbs on a load range D tire, you can find tire manuf tables that show a reduced pressure for any given actual weight per tire but, I don't think a tire engineer would recommend those tables except to say that the tire should not fail.

The highway is tough enough on tires without any help from us.
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Old 05-22-2006, 11:14 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wingfoot321
I run as close as possible to what is on the sidewall. My trailer is a 29' and about the same weight as yours. I do not want an underinflated tire to wear the outside edges faster than the centerline. Your trailer will weigh out at 6500-7000lbs and with a turbo diesel doing the pulling, your rig is capable of putting a real load on the tires. Underinflation translates to higher operating temperature due to sidewall flex.

The tire manufacturer is the final authority. Airstream shouldn't even be in the picture. Granted, if the sidewall rating is 2540lbs on a load range D tire, you can find tire manuf tables that show a reduced pressure for any given actual weight per tire but, I don't think a tire engineer would recommend those tables except to say that the tire should not fail.

The highway is tough enough on tires without any help from us.
I disagree completely, you should run the tire pressure which is sufficent to carry the load placed on them. My Safari grosses at 5800 lbs or 1450 per tire, at max pressure of 65 psi the tires will carry 2040 each or 8160 total and the trailer will bounce all over. Airstream says 35 psi and that is what I run. My Dodge weighs 5500 lbs wet and has 12.50x16.5 tires which will carry 2810 lbs at 50 psi or a total of 10,440 for four tires, two would carry the entire truck, I run them at 25 psi. The tire engineers came up with load capacity at various psi just for that reason.

Bill
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Old 05-23-2006, 12:23 AM   #4
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Absolutely correct information. The max inflation is at max load ,so if your reading the sidewall it says max pressure of 65 psi at max load of 2540 if a D range tire .Your not going to wear the tires on the outsudes if they have the correct (key word) inflation pressure for the load .You need to know what your coach weight is loaded to go,then inflate the tires accordingly .Proper pressure isn't always max inflation .Others may disagree,but its what the numbers on the tires say ,the reason the manafactures put it there so you have the information your asking for .

Scott
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Old 05-23-2006, 01:45 AM   #5
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Not to toss Sterno onto the flame....

Michael et al -

Not to toss Sterno onto the flame that is burning bright here....but

A few thoughts if I may be so bold....

One of the greatest enemies to TT tires is sidewall flex. There is much discussion about 'wear' and the like... NOT gonna happen unless you pull 40K a year or better.

The greatest threat to your tires is heat. The #1 generator of heat is sidewall flex. Period.

Sidewall flex can be caused by excessive speed, lots of side loading G-forces ( curvy road + high speed). But the primary cause is likely underinflation.

I run the tires at the max inflation listed. Period. Same for the TV when towing.

Blowouts are EXPENSIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!! Not to mention time consuming. AND a 'blow' to the ego for me.

I have seen the bills at JC (over someone's shoulder while they cried with checkbook and pen in hand) and that is something I DO NOT EVER want to have happen to me, or SilverToy. 1 tire caused a $6K+ bill.

The $700 tire replacement bill (6 plus spare) is CHEAP.

Max sidewall inflation. Do it!

"You can pay me now, or you can pay me later" - later stinks!

Thanks for listening.

Axel
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Old 05-23-2006, 07:25 AM   #6
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The factory specifies the recommended tire pressure based on the load they think the trailer can handle. Too high a pressure will increase the overall suspension stiffness. This can result in a harsh ride on rough roads and lead to rivet failures, internal cabinet failures, frame failures, etc. Too low a pressure can result in too much flex and heat build-up in the tire leading to tire failure and major damage to the unit. The pressure on the side of the tire is the maximum pressure the tire manufacturer recommends for this tire and has nothing to do with what the tire should be inflated to for an individual trailer usage.

If you are on smooth roads running the maximum pressure will only effect how the tire wears. (Usually too much wear in the middle of the tread.) An underinflated ( or misaligned tire) will wear mostly on the edges. Under inflated tires (even on smooth roads) can cause massive tire blow outs.

IN CONCLUSION:

Run the pressure recommended by the factory, not the maximum pressure specified by the tire manufacturer.
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