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Old 06-22-2011, 02:17 PM   #1
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Tundra Tow vehicle tires

I just purchased a new 2011 Toyota Tundra double-cab with the 5.7l engine (and towing package) for towing my recently ordered Airstream Flying Cloud 25FB. The tires on the Tundra are Michelin LTX A/S P275/65R18. Are these tires suitable for towing that trailer (tongue weight around 1,000 lbs.)? Also, what tire pressure(s) should I use when towing? (Standard is 33 front and 30 rear).
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Old 06-22-2011, 02:31 PM   #2
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We've had our Tundra for just over two months and have made two camping trips plus a few back and forths to storage. I'll check what size they are but ours came with some hefty Bridgestones on it (not all terrain type tires but a stout truck tire), which I gather are not the usual tire for some reason. But so far they have done really well. We are pulling 23 foot safari.
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Old 06-22-2011, 02:38 PM   #3
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Looks like they are rated 2601lbs max load

44psi max.

LTX is a great tire, shouldn't be a problem.
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Old 06-22-2011, 03:36 PM   #4
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Wlanford, when we got our 2007 Tundra, same specs as yours probably, it came with Goodrich tires. That is Michelin's junk brand and we got rid of the when they had 18,000 miles on them. They also were P (passenger) tires and Load Range C. We towed the same trailer while we had the Goodrich tires on and had no problems. They wore fast and maybe would have gotten to 23-25,000 miles.

We replaced them with Michelin LTX A/S2 Load Range E tires. We got the LR E tires because they had very deep tread and they should last longer than we keep the truck. They ride much smoother than the Goodrich tires. We keep them 42 front and 45 rear when not towing and add 3 lbs. when towing. This is based on several phone calls to Michelin.

With the Goodrich tires we ran 44 lbs. all around when towing if my memory is correct. Perhaps several lbs. less in front would be better. The front end was too high with the recommended pressure. This may have also been affected by the poor way the dealer set up the hitch. You should check the hitch once you get the trailer home and make sure there is enough air in the tires. Some dealers have no interest taking the time to set up the hitch properly.

Lately manufacturers have been putting P tires on light trucks. They seem to support less weight than an LT tire of the same size, but Bob checked and it appears and the OEM tires are fine for your needs.

The tongue weight for your trailer should be somewhat less than 1,000 lbs. Check the specs, but the 2008 tongue wt. was 720 lbs. It may be more when you figure propane and spare tire and however you pack the trailer. Some of that weight will be transferred forward to the front axle of the truck with a weight distribution hitch, and some back to the trailer axles. Airstream sometimes has listed tongue weight differently for the same trailer in the same year in different places. That is one of the charms of owning an Airstream.

Michelins are a very popular tire with Airstreamers. They ride well, have superior traction, and last. Because we go to some pretty remote places, we like to have LR E tires so there is plenty of tread on bad roads—it means fewer flats. You should do fine with the Michelins on the Tundra.

As you look around the Forum, you will discover many of use have replaced the OEM wheels and tires with 16" so we can put an LT tire on the trailer, usually Michelins. The OEM Marathons have a poor reputation. You will easily find the threads on that question.

Enjoy your new trailer—there's a fairly steep learning curve, but the Forum will help you sort it out.

Gene
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Old 06-22-2011, 05:46 PM   #5
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Bob,

The trailer tires are LTX M&S LT225/75R16E. I run them at 68 psi. Because the LTX has less tread depth than the more expensive version, it doesn't last as long. But when I figured how many miles we would cover on them in the 5 years after they were installed, the A/T2 would be overkill, so the standard LTX was the best choice.

The Tundra tires are LT275/65R18E. The Tundra tires come in a range of sizes depending on the trim line. It is possible the Limited came with Michelins, but we bought the SR5. I think they have changed the names of the trim lines recently. In my post above I said A/S2, but they are A/T2 (all terrain).

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Old 06-22-2011, 06:06 PM   #6
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Gene,

I deleted that post, couldn't find my tire size on the Michelin Website wanted to double check TP recommendations.

PO of the Burb upgraded to LT 265/75 R16 MS LTX and Iv'e always gone by the sidewall info for MAX pressures.

When towing 70F 75R
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Old 06-22-2011, 07:41 PM   #7
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our Bridgestones are 255/70R18 11T
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Old 06-22-2011, 08:26 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by wlanford View Post
I just purchased a new 2011 Toyota Tundra double-cab with the 5.7l engine (and towing package) for towing my recently ordered Airstream Flying Cloud 25FB. The tires on the Tundra are Michelin LTX A/S P275/65R18. Are these tires suitable for towing that trailer (tongue weight around 1,000 lbs.)? Also, what tire pressure(s) should I use when towing? (Standard is 33 front and 30 rear).
My '11 double cab w/ 5.7 also came with these tires. I'm going to run them near the max. 44 PSI for towing. In fact the truck was delivered with 38-40 PSI in the tires, although the manual does call for low 30s.

BTW if you're installing brake controller, to get access to factory plug, the door sill pops straight up, the the scuff molding comes backward to release (after removing the thumb screw). I'd order the Prodigy with the Toyota harness, plugs right in.
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:31 PM   #9
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Gene, you now have me concerned about the trailer tires! Since my trailer has not yet been built, should I (if it's possible) ask Airstream to install 16" wheels and better Michelin tires at time of manufacture of my trailer? I would assume the cost would be less up-front rather than replacing the OEM wheels and tires after the fact. I would rather be safe than sorry.
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Old 06-23-2011, 01:12 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by wlanford View Post
Gene, you now have me concerned about the trailer tires! Since my trailer has not yet been built, should I (if it's possible) ask Airstream to install 16" wheels and better Michelin tires at time of manufacture of my trailer? I would assume the cost would be less up-front rather than replacing the OEM wheels and tires after the fact. I would rather be safe than sorry.
Gene will probably get to your question. But I'll give my opinion.. Yes I'd have Airstream install the best tires possible at the factory. A blowout can cause expensive collateral damage to the trailer's sheet metal and other components.

My trailer was not custom ordered and came with the standard tires. I've been very careful about replacing them on a fairly frequent schedule, and inspecting them often.
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:22 PM   #11
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Wlanford, there are numerous tire threads and if you have time, you can read some of it—if you read all of it, you may have to go to a rest home for a while. There is much debate over tires.

Personally, I believe ST tires are under engineered for today's towing conditions and speeds. There is evidence of tread separation problems, but it is largely anecdotal. The polls I have linked give some stats, but the sample is small. The Marathons wear fast.

Michelins ride better, last longer, have good traction in rain and snow and we have used them for decades. We have 18,000 miles on the Michelin LTX's and they are wearing evenly, have lots of tread and hardly ever lose any air. The Marathons always lost air and had to be pumped up a few pounds every few days. You should save some money by having them installed at the factory. The price of the wheels should not be very different (16" vs. 15") and Michelins cost much more than Marathons. Check prices on websites for the two brands. Airstream will charge you top dollar, but you won't have to change later. Given how many miles Michelins last, they are cheaper per mile I think.

Note that many people tow with Marathons and are happy. But many were unhappy. Just about everyone, maybe everyone, is happy with Michelins.

Also make sure they put metal valve stems in the wheels—pretty much standard with 16" wheels, but you never know. Our OEM tires came with rubber valve stems. If you get a TPMS system, you will want metal.

Also, to provide a better ride and keep the tires balanced, lots of us use Centramatics—they were $400 for 4 wheels when we bought them. Do a search on that and you'll find out more information.

Here are some threads: http://www.airforums.com/forums/f438...oll-76867.html

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f438...res-77069.html

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f438...res-28293.html

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f465...res-69297.html

There is no end to the things you can change and improve on your new baby. You have to pick and choose and to us, safety issues came first. Good, hopefully the best, tires are very important.

Gene
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:38 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by ROBERT CROSS View Post
Looks like they are rated 2601lbs max load

44psi max.

LTX is a great tire, shouldn't be a problem.
I have them on my Ridgeline with 17" rims. My research shows them to be some of the best out there.
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Old 06-24-2011, 02:16 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by wlanford View Post
I just purchased a new 2011 Toyota Tundra double-cab with the 5.7l engine (and towing package) for towing my recently ordered Airstream Flying Cloud 25FB. The tires on the Tundra are Michelin LTX A/S P275/65R18. Are these tires suitable for towing that trailer (tongue weight around 1,000 lbs.)? Also, what tire pressure(s) should I use when towing? (Standard is 33 front and 30 rear).
Hi, the tow rating on your truck is with the tires that came on it, so you should be OK. Many "P" tires have a max air pressure of 44 lbs. On my Lincoln, my front tires are set at 26 lbs and the rear are set at 33 lbs.

[factory specs] Since max pressure on my tires is 44 lbs, I set the front tires to 35 lbs and the rear tires at 40 lbs for towing.
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Old 06-25-2011, 12:41 AM   #14
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There is a lot of good information above and all accurate. It comes down to personal preference, your comfort level, and what you are willing to spend. Some people live in ice and snow and there are those that don't. You surly would not go wrong with the Michelin M/S or A/T in an E rating. I ran the A/T prior to the current tread design and it is an amazing tire everywhere. My 2010 Tundra Limited came with 20 in. wheels. It is my every day vehicle and I live in the mountains, so snow and Ice is always a consideration along with off road use. This Tundra was three inches lower overall than my 2000 Tundra, so I put a 3/1 lift, level kit on the truck and up graded to BFGoodrich T/A KO in size
285-65-20, a 35 in. tall tire. This is not the best set up for towing only due to the tire diameter. But the BFG is also an amazing tire if you need an aggressive tire. Even though the Michelin does not look as aggressive as the BFG, I would rate them equal in snow and ice. Only two company s make a 285-65-20 tire and Michelin is not one of them. The Tundra has no problem turning over the 285-65-20. An unexpected bonus to the larger diameter tire on the Tundra is that they eliminated the abrupt throttle tip in the Tundra is known for.

As for the trailer tires I do not think you can beat the Michelin LTX M/S2 if you have 16 in. wheels as you can get a variety of load ranges. And, well, their Michelins', there is a lot riding on your tires. However, I have not read every tire thread on here but I have read many. So far everyone has missed one point about the LX rated tires including the Michelin M/S2. in a 15 in. size. The LX is a rating to extend the usage range of a passenger car rated tire for short duration use (such as putting a less expensive tire on trucks to keep the price down and the load rating up when selling from the dealership). It is only designed to carry the max load when at max inflation. It is not designed to constantly carry the max load as a C,D, or E rated tire is. When an LX rated tire is used under a constant max load condition such as on a trailer. The max load is reduced to only 91% of it's max load rating (I am referencing a section under Load Ratings from The Tire Rack web page). So for the Michelin M/S2 in a 235-75-15 the constant max load is 1986.53 lb. and not 2183 lb. It appears that know body has any problems with this tire and that is most likely because it is a Michelin.

Because I have 15 in. wheels I chose to purchase a full D rated tire. I have not heard of any complaints about any of these tires so her is what I chose between.

My searches for tires brought me to the same place as a few others. I have a 1978, 25 ft. Traide Wind and there is plenty of room for any of these tires. I have done measurements and read plenty of post from many of you guys. The question is. Are you willing to give up 1/2 in. of ground clearance with the 225-70-15? Or, go with a 10 mm. wider 235-75-15 than stock tire and remain at the same tire diameter as stock at approximately 29 in.?

There is the Perelli ATR load rated D, 2335 lb. @ 65 lbs. in size 235-75-15 There is plenty of clearance room on my 1978 25 ft Traidwind for the extra 10mm. Tire Rack list price of $142.00 The tire is made in Argentina or Brazil.

There is the Goodyear Cargo G26 Load rated D, 2470 lb.@ 65 lbs. in size 225-70-15 This tire is smaller in diameter and will lower the trailer 1/2 in. as stated previously. Tire Rack list the price at $209.00 The tires are made in either France or Germany.

There is also the Continental Vanco 2 Load rated D, 2470 lb. @ 65 lbs. in size 225-70-15 This tire is smaller in diameter and will lower the trailer 1/2 in. also. The Tire Rack list price is $131.00 and the tire is made in either Slovakia or Germany.

I wound up purchasing the Continentals as all of the tire options needed to be ordered as my local dealer (100 miles away) did not have any of the listed tires in stock. I have not even picked up the tires yet but feel I will be impressed.
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