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Old 09-14-2014, 06:44 PM   #15
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I know I am late to this party but wanted to glean some knowledge. I have a 27FB Safari with a 2001 Tundra TV. I am trying to stay within specs for the TV tires. I am looking at 265/70/16 LT with a 112 Load index which is 2,469 lbs. per tire. Not sure an E rated tire is my best option. Thoughts??
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Old 07-04-2016, 03:20 PM   #16
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newbie tow vehicle wheel & tire question

hi all,
I have a new to me 2010 Tundra that needs new tires, so wondering what my best choice is.. this will be a relatively low mileage vehicle, not used for commuting, just weekend round around and yearly, two or three trips with the AS. I will also encounter some mild dirt roads in the high sierra when I use my other camper, which is a pop-up.

thanks all ..

Nick
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Old 07-07-2016, 11:32 AM   #17
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There are scores of tire threads, mostly about trailer tires, but lots about tow vehicle tires. If you decide to read them all, you will never leave your house, but do reasonable research.

Whether or not you drive the truck a lot, cheap, mediocre, good or excellent tires will still be cheap, mediocre, good or excellent. You can look for an excellent tire that doesn't last beyond the out date—that's when a tire is too old even with good tread. We do drive a lot and wear out truck and SUV tires before the out date. We also have snow, sometimes a lot, and thus look for really good snow tread, not all season tires.

To me, tires are a vital part of safety and they have a lot to do with comfort. Some tires ride well, others don't. Since we wear out tires, buying ones that last the longest is usually the best option because a tire that lasts 65,000 miles at $225 each is more economical than a tire that lasts 30,000 miles and costs $125. Adding to economies is not having to research tires and go get the tires mounted one more time. Paying for mounting and balancing and other costs of tire changing is money wasted when you have to do it twice instead of once in a given period of time. And when you sell the truck, you get better money if the tires are pretty good or better than a cheap tire worn down.

We buy Michelins because they last a long time, ride very well, and have excellent traction including when they are pretty old. They are expensive initially, but not in the long run.

I don't know what you mean by low mileage, Nick. Michelin LTX truck tires are rated for 60-70,000 miles, I believe. We always get that many miles from them, sometimes more. While many people say a tire is too old at five, Michelin has recommended 7 years. Parking in the sun reduces tire life if the truck just sits there for long periods, but if you use it every week it is probably ok since that gives the chemicals in the tire a chance to work through the tire regularly—that's what extends the rubber's life.

To me, Michelins work best for us. Our Tundra came not with LT tires, but P tires. A lot of pickups come with P tires because they are cheaper. I think Bob's post above (# 13) is correct—whatever came on it is ok. But I like better tires than most OEM tires. So, figure out what your mileage is for 5 or 7 years (whatever you are comfortable with) and then check out safety, traction and your particular needs. What you can afford is also a consideration of course.

Gene
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:12 PM   #18
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Ditto on the Michelins. I went through two sets of Bridgestones on my 2011 Tundra on less than 60K miles so I bit the bullet and spent the extra for Michelins which are showing no wear after 17K miles and about 5K of towing

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Old 07-08-2016, 12:39 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene View Post
There are scores of tire threads, mostly about trailer tires, but lots about tow vehicle tires. If you decide to read them all, you will never leave your house, but do reasonable research.

Whether or not you drive the truck a lot, cheap, mediocre, good or excellent tires will still be cheap, mediocre, good or excellent. You can look for an excellent tire that doesn't last beyond the out date—that's when a tire is too old even with good tread. We do drive a lot and wear out truck and SUV tires before the out date. We also have snow, sometimes a lot, and thus look for really good snow tread, not all season tires.

To me, tires are a vital part of safety and they have a lot to do with comfort. Some tires ride well, others don't. Since we wear out tires, buying ones that last the longest is usually the best option because a tire that lasts 65,000 miles at $225 each is more economical than a tire that lasts 30,000 miles and costs $125. Adding to economies is not having to research tires and go get the tires mounted one more time. Paying for mounting and balancing and other costs of tire changing is money wasted when you have to do it twice instead of once in a given period of time. And when you sell the truck, you get better money if the tires are pretty good or better than a cheap tire worn down.

We buy Michelins because they last a long time, ride very well, and have excellent traction including when they are pretty old. They are expensive initially, but not in the long run.

I don't know what you mean by low mileage, Nick. Michelin LTX truck tires are rated for 60-70,000 miles, I believe. We always get that many miles from them, sometimes more. While many people say a tire is too old at five, Michelin has recommended 7 years. Parking in the sun reduces tire life if the truck just sits there for long periods, but if you use it every week it is probably ok since that gives the chemicals in the tire a chance to work through the tire regularly—that's what extends the rubber's life.

To me, Michelins work best for us. Our Tundra came not with LT tires, but P tires. A lot of pickups come with P tires because they are cheaper. I think Bob's post above (# 13) is correct—whatever came on it is ok. But I like better tires than most OEM tires. So, figure out what your mileage is for 5 or 7 years (whatever you are comfortable with) and then check out safety, traction and your particular needs. What you can afford is also a consideration of course.

Gene
thanks for the detailed response, I've always used Michelin tires and never had any issues. I consider them the best tires period. My son is egging me on to get
hybrid road / offroad tires. They look cool on the Tundra but are they practical for towing and other day to day uses ... we might do minor off-road driving once or twice a year while camping in the high sierra.
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Old 07-08-2016, 02:24 PM   #20
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We have the LTX A/T2 265/75R18/E on the Tundra, which is our tow vehicle. The experience with the A/T2 as reported by Gene was the final deciding factor and has worked well for us. I just went through a tire purchase for our 2000 Land Cruiser and was considering the same tire, though in a 16" size, but went with the Defender M/S2 LRE since it has a more agressive thread design for our winters up here. The LC is the daily driver with the Tundra used mostly for towing. One comment that the Discount Tire manager in Glenwood mentioned, was that the A/T2 rubber compound makes it more resistent to gravel roads and rocks. For a dryer climate I would have gone with the A/T2 LRE.
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Old 07-08-2016, 04:31 PM   #21
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There are two versions of the LTX tire—the all terrain and the other one (the M+S2 I think). They cost about the same, though the AT may be a little more. The AT has a more aggressive tread. I have used both and have not noticed a real difference in ride, though one would think the AT would be a rougher ride. I don't take the truck on 4wd drive roads (it is too big for most of them) where an all terrain tread would be better, but I have used the regular LTX M+S2 all sorts of places and in deep snow with a variety of 4wd Toyotas and never needed the AT.

Steamboat gets a lot more snow than where we live now, but when we lived in Evergreen where snow is a way of life, never had any problems with either LTX version.

I buy the Load Range E version because although it is more tire than necessary for weight, the tread is a half inch deep and lasts and lasts and lasts. If you go on roads where blowouts are said to be common, such as some in Alaska and northern Canada, a very deep tread protects you better. Not sure those roads really are as bad as they say in the Milepost though.

There are some tires that Michelin calls LT for light truck, but they are really P (passenger) tires. P will be stamped on the sidewall, not LT. Usually Michelin is consumer friendly, but this is not.

Gene
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:14 PM   #22
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Gene, I agree with you on the LRE; it just feels like a more solid ride. And I think the LRE tires help mitigate the fact that our Tundra is probably 200 lbs over gross.

Some may find LRE too stiff, but you don't have to put in the 80 psi. Around 60 psi seems to be a good range.
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:39 PM   #23
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Anyone tried the MICHELIN PREMIER LTX? Pat
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Old 07-08-2016, 07:10 PM   #24
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Anyone tried the MICHELIN PREMIER LTX? Pat

I have them on my flex, very happy sofar but I would stick with the MS2 or A/T tires for my truck. The premier seems to be more of a performance suv tire than a truck tire.
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Old 07-08-2016, 08:38 PM   #25
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-- snip -- suv tire
Thank you. Those are better truck tires. Pat
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Old 07-10-2016, 12:53 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steamy1 View Post

Some may find LRE too stiff, but you don't have to put in the 80 psi. Around 60 psi seems to be a good range.
When I was researching tires for the Tundra long ago, I called Michelin to ask about tire pressure in the LTX Load Range E. This tire is not usually recommended for this truck, so the Michelin guy (I didn't ask if his name was Bibendum) calculated what he thought was proper. He came up with 42 front, 45 rear and add 3 lbs. for towing.

I have followed those recommendations for about 8 years and the tires have worn evenly until I checked them yesterday. There was a little more wear on the outsides indicating low pressure. I sometimes forget to let air out when I'm not towing, but that would not cause more wear at the sides. I may increase the pressure by 2 lbs. and see what happens.

My first set of LR E Michelins lasted just shy of 70,000 miles. I am at 20,000 miles on the second set and they are about 45-50% worn. I just checked the last tire invoice and measured tread depth yesterday.

I don't know if they wear faster at first because half an inch of tread is pretty deep or Michelin changed something. I don't think we are driving any differently (maybe slower) and we have towed fewer miles in those last 20,000 than we did previously. I believe they are warranted for 60,000 miles, so if they wear quickly, I will be making a claim. In the last 15 years we have gotten 60,000+ miles from LTX tires.

Gene
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