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Old 07-13-2015, 11:50 AM   #57
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LTX is a line of tires sold by Michelin not all of the LTX line tires are LT (truck tires)
My Nissan Xterra has LTX-MS2 on it and they are P (passenger tires).
My 2500 Dodge 4x4 TV has LTX - AS on it and they are LT tires (load range e truck tires) .
People are confusing a companys tire line with a tire type designation.

Joe D
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Old 07-13-2015, 12:10 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by Dexterpix View Post
LTX is a line of tires sold by Michelin not all of the LTX line tires are LT (truck tires)
My Nissan Xterra has LTX-MS2 on it and they are P (passenger tires).
My 2500 Dodge 4x4 TV has LTX - AS on it and they are LT tires (load range e truck tires) .
People are confusing a companys tire line with a tire type designation.

Joe D
What differences are there between P and LT tires except for their load ratings?

Ken
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Old 07-13-2015, 01:21 PM   #59
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Michelin has used "X" as a type of tire at least since the 1960's. I think back then it was used to show it had steel cord in the tire, something no one else had done then. Maybe it related to radial tires, though, as they came out around then too.

Sometime in the past 10 years they added "X" to "LT" for their light truck tires and then M/S, M/S2 or A/T(maybe 2 also) for mud and snow or all terrain. They are pretty similar though the A/T has a bit more aggressive tread. But a few years ago, they started selling P tires with the name "LTX"—that is misleading because they are not a truck tire, but a passenger tire.

The difference? From the internet (where everything is true)—

LT vs P Tires

The tires of truck and passenger vehicles are different. The tires differ in their size and air pressure. Well, in order to differentiate between truck and passenger vehicle tires, the letters LT and P are placed in front of the tire size.

If you want to carry heavier loads, or want to travel on harsh roads, then the best tires are the LT tires, as they are tougher on the roads than the P tires. If you just want to ride on the highways, and if there is nothing much to tow or carry, then the P type is the best choice.

P tires refer to Passenger tires and LT refers to Light Truck tires. One of the main differences that can be noticed between the two types of tires is that the LT tires are not as flexible as the P tires.

When comparing their durability, the LT tires are more durable than the P type tires. Moreover, LT tires are stronger when compared to the P types. LT tires ride rougher than the P tires, which ride smoother on the roads.

Another difference that can be seen between the two types, is that the Light truck tires come with maximum inflation. Unlike the Passenger tires, the Light Truck ones are used for carrying more loads. LT tires have a load range of 10 ply, whereas P tires only have a 4 ply load range.

Light Truck tires are made of more aggressive treads than the Passenger type tires. LT tires will give a more stable feeling on the roads.


You don't have to buy only E load range LT tires, so that part is wrong and I think P tires are available with more plies. The rest seems accurate. There are also Eurometric tires, just for fun. A good LT tire can ride better than a cheap P tire.

Gene
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Old 07-13-2015, 01:24 PM   #60
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P series tires are usually one load range. They do offer some extra load range models. If you use air pressure rating as a simple way to show load range most P series tires have a max PSI of 35, the extra load one to like 40-41PSI.

LT series tires have several load ranges (B - F ) lowest PSI 35 to high of 95 PSI.

LT tires will have stiffer sidewalls to handle the increase load

This is the same for ST tires they have several load ranges and are a stiffer tire to handle to loads.

P series tires have more and much higher speed ratings than LT and ST tires the lighter construction allows heat to be managed better.

Lt tires will offer more tread types (very simple rib tire to a full off road mud)

P series tires are anything from simple basic tire to full racing tire.

I stick to tires made for the job you want them to do, and follow the tire companies guide lines for use. They made the tire, they should now how to best use it

Joe D
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Old 07-13-2015, 01:31 PM   #61
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But a few years ago, they started selling P tires with the name "LTX"—that is misleading because they are not a truck tire, but a passenger tire.


As far as I'm concerned, that's deceptive advertising.

This is what lead to my confusion in a previous post.

I can confuse myself just fine. I need no help from Michelin thank you.

Ken
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Old 07-13-2015, 01:31 PM   #62
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The idea of ST tires was to have a stronger sidewall for lateral movement when backing a trailer so you don't pull the tire off the wheel. The radials of that time had quite weak sidewalls, so the ST was invented. But as Joe says, LT's also have stronger sidewalls and work fine for trailer backing. The Michelin Rib has a very strong sidewall—it is basically an intracity delivery truck tire and made to be retreaded. Not my idea of a trailer tire, but those who use them find them great.

LT's may have lower speed ratings, but I think most are rated more than 100 mph, so if you really want to get somewhere fast with your trailer, you may have to use a P tire.

Gene
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Old 07-13-2015, 01:34 PM   #63
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Me too, confused easily.
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Old 07-13-2015, 02:09 PM   #64
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Yes, this thread has gotten very confusing, though that's pretty normal around here. Capri, I think I recall your March post on Michelin's use of the same model name for very different tires.

M.: offset for recent Airstream models (since 2000 I believe and probably before), is 0˚. Sorry to hear your Tundra has 20" tires as they cost even more and I am unsure there is any benefit to larger and larger tire diameters.

I sure am glad I am happy with our tires and wonder why I read these tire threads.

Gene

The reason you read these threads is to impart your wisdom and knowledge to your less informed or less knowledgable fellow Airstreamers.
I (and we) really appreciate it.
I glean from these threads that LT tires can safely handle more weight.
I might one day put 16" wheels on the trailer and 17" wheels on the truck to get Load Range E tires.
It is like sound equipment. Not that you plan to play a stereo at high volume all the time, but more power (headroom) means it plays more efficiently and with a better full range sound at lower volumes.
It's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
I have never had any trouble, but I never drive over 65 mph.
Even if I stay with the factory 20's on the truck, I want the Goodyear Marathon ST tires gone.


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Old 07-14-2015, 06:38 AM   #65
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Yes, LT is the general all brands classification. LTX is Michelin but so is X Radial LT. They have a different tread. The differences are not advertised. Regardless though avionstream, you are correct LT is light truck.

See, that's what a little information does. It makes people think they understand something they don't!

And I apologize, rodster, for singling out your post to respond to, but it was the most convenient.

First, there are a number of ways to sort out tires. When the tire manufacturers get together to set sizing and loading standards, they frequently use letters to designate different sizing and loading standards. The use of the letters "P", "ST", and "LT" in front of or behind the numbers in the size is that indication. - BUT - those letters don't always line up with the actual usage.

The best example of that is pickup trucks. Small pickups use P type tires, where heavy duty pickups use LT's. This has EVERYTHING to do with load carrying capacity.

Please note that while there are low load carrying capacity LT tires, they are NOT usually used on small pickups.

Now what about tire lines? That is, the names tire manufacturers use. They typically line up with the sizing and loading standards - BUT NOT ALWAYS!!

A good example is Michelin. They have the Premier LTX, LTX A/S, LTX MS, LTX MS2, etc. Please note they do NOT have an LTX.

These tires are designed for different usages on light truck vehicles - meaning pickup trucks, vans, and SUV's. Each has a slightly different design intent - for example, all season, traction, etc. - AND - each comes in appropriate sizes for the design intent. In many cases, that is BOTH P type tires and LT type tires.

Confusing? You bet. That's why there is a vehicle tire placard. It will list the original tire size and the pressure specified by the vehicle manufacturer for that size. EVERY vehicle sold in the US will have a placard - with a few exceptions, it is required by law.

If you select a tire by it's size, it's hard to go wrong. And by size, I am meaning the letters, too!

Where it does go wrong is when the vehicle manufacturer specified a size that is marginal. Trailers, especially older trailers are problem areas.
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Old 07-14-2015, 07:44 AM   #66
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Well said. The point of my post was that when people ask for or give tire type and size information it would really help if the COMPLETE size information was gives.
The use of "short-hand" nomenclature raises the potential for misunderstanding.

Leaving off the letters in the front and the "service description" if any after the rim diameter such as saying "235/75R15" means we could be talking about an
P235/75R15 105S or
LT235/75R15 101/104Q LRC or
LT235/75R15 LRC or
ST235/75R15 LRC
each of the above have different load capacities.
There are eight different max load numbers associated with these "235/75R15" tires depending on application so it is important to be specific.

NOTE The above are US tire sizes as I didn't include "Euro-Metric" nomenclature which would add a few more variations.

I covered this topic in depth way back in Sept 14 2011 on my RV Tire Blog
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Old 07-14-2015, 10:58 AM   #67
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So LTX tires are not light truck tires.?
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Old 07-14-2015, 11:31 AM   #68
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So LTX tires are not light truck tires.?
This is not stated as fact. It is what I got out of this discussion.

Some are, some aren't. LTX is a marketing ploy by Michelin to confuse buyers, so they will believe whatever the tire salesmen tell them. I have to go beyond the LTX and go to the manufacturers web site and look up the full designator for the tire, including size and all letters before and after the size. Then, probably, I can find the data on the intended uses for that particular tire and its load range. This is only valid however, if I have gotten by all the seemingly contradicting information available and still trust anything a tire manufacturer or salesman tells me.

If none of this works, then I have to wing it. If anyone in authority asks if I am using the tire properly, I will just tell them, " Yes, I know I am, because someone on an internet forum told me so."

Ken
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Old 07-15-2015, 06:56 AM   #69
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So LTX tires are not light truck tires?
Let's put it like this.

1) There is no LTX tire line. There are several lines of LTX tires with different suffixes that designate different lines of tires. Think of "LTX" as a family of tires, and what a person wants will have a different set of letters after.

2) People commonly confuse the letters "LT" in the tire size as meaning "Light Truck", and because of that think that all light trucks need to have LT tires, and vice versa - that is only sort of true. Some pickups and vans take LT tires, some take P type tires.

3) So the LTX lines of tires ARE for light truck vehicles, but you have to be careful because not all LTX tires are LT tires. Plus, if you do NOT include SUV's as "light trucks", then there is a line of LTX tires that are NOT for "light trucks".
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Old 07-15-2015, 06:59 AM   #70
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Marketing gibberish. Not a fan of Michilen anyway, so I shouldn't have asked the question.
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