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Old 10-05-2016, 07:30 AM   #1
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Tire pressure on the road

I started out in FL at about mid 80s, set my pressures to 65. I've been traveling north and now am in NY with morning temp around 50. Tire pressure is down as one would expect. Question is, should I let it stay a few psi low and press on or air them up to 65 and adjust as I transition between climates.


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Old 10-05-2016, 08:02 AM   #2
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What tires do you have? IMHO thart if you are on GYMs they need to be a 65 lbs or you are risking a very bad outcome. If you are on LT tires, you may have more wriggle room.

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Old 10-05-2016, 08:39 AM   #3
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Temperatures vary constantly during a trip and during the day. No way or need to keep up with it, unless there is an extreme change. It'll probably be in the 70's in New York today.
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Old 10-05-2016, 10:12 AM   #4
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leave em be until you get home...
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Old 10-05-2016, 11:05 AM   #5
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What kind of tires do you have, and what is the recommended tire pressure on the tires' sidewalls?

Assuming you stop for the night, you should check the tire pressures every morning when they are cold (which is ambient temperature for the locality). This is a good habit to get into, regardless of air temp and different climates on the road.

Top up to 65 [or AS recommended pressure] if necessary, and keep your speed under 65 as well for ST tires.



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Originally Posted by dblee1950 View Post
I started out in FL at about mid 80s, set my pressures to 65. I've been traveling north and now am in NY with morning temp around 50. Tire pressure is down as one would expect. Question is, should I let it stay a few psi low and press on or air them up to 65 and adjust as I transition between climates.


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Old 10-05-2016, 01:22 PM   #6
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Personal experience

I am a cyclist and add air to my bike tires each morning. I've been doing the same with my 2015 Bambi. I start each travel morning with 65 psi, measured in the shade and cool. I agree with limiting speed to 65. My tow vehicle is a 4 cylinder diesel which is in it's happy place at 100 kph aka 62 mph. 30,000 miles on the same OEM tires with no issues.
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Old 10-05-2016, 01:24 PM   #7
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Adjusting Tirepressure on the road

Each and every morning before heading out the pressure should be adjusted to 65 PSI (load range D) regardless of temperature. It should be left alone for the rest of the day - unless you have a problem. A good tire pressure monitor system (such as the TST 501) will allow monitoring all day long, as well as providing great education on pressure vs. temperature and speed.

Good luck and may your air stay put.
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Old 10-05-2016, 01:44 PM   #8
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I think it's best to update the cold pressure seasonally or during a 'significant' temperature or altitude change. If I were crossing the Rockies for example I would not stop and change anything but if I planned to stay in Denver for a week or more I probably would have a look.
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Old 10-05-2016, 02:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
What kind of tires do you have, and what is the recommended tire pressure on the tires' sidewalls?

Assuming you stop for the night, you should check the tire pressures every morning when they are cold (which is ambient temperature for the locality). This is a good habit to get into, regardless of air temp and different climates on the road.

Top up to 65 [or AS recommended pressure] if necessary, and keep your speed under 65 as well for ST tires.

OTRA 15 is correct in the advice given. To that I would add that it is a good idea to weigh your rig one axle at a time to determine your load on each while hitched to your TV. You can then go to the tire manufacturer's web site or a dealer and get the pressure vs load chart to determine the minimum recommended tire pressure you may run for that load. That will also tell you if your load needs to be redistributed if either axle weight exceeds the permitted load on the chart. If A/S recommends 65psi for the OEM tires they put on your trailer you should check daily and add air as needed to your tires at ambient temperature. My GYM tires say max 65 psi but my vintage trailer loaded only requires 45 lbs pressure. Your newer trailer is heavier hence the 65psi recommendation. Also, the load capacity of the tire is directly proportional to the pressure, therefore 65psi on the GYM tires gives you the maximum load carrying capacity.
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Old 10-05-2016, 03:37 PM   #10
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Well if you get up in the morning and the sun is on the right side tire it will have a higher pressure than the left side, so you let some air out of the right side. Then if you head out towing west for the day with the sun on the left side and the right side now in the shade, you will have quite an imbalance between the two.

I set them at the beginning of the trip and leave them alone. Our Michelins haven't lost any air in over a year.
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Old 10-05-2016, 04:40 PM   #11
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Thx all for input. I expected it to vary. For those that asked, I have 16" Michelins on my 25FC. I also have a TPMS.
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Old 10-05-2016, 06:44 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Well if you get up in the morning and the sun is on the right side tire it will have a higher pressure than the left side, so you let some air out of the right side. Then if you head out towing west for the day with the sun on the left side and the right side now in the shade, you will have quite an imbalance between the two.

I set them at the beginning of the trip and leave them alone. Our Michelins haven't lost any air in over a year.
ALWAYS set your tire pressures in the shade, in the morning shade is best.
If after a run, park in the shade for all tires, and set your pressures after three hours when the tires have stabilized.
Anything else will give you false readings to start.

If checking the tires on your TV or 'bus', raise the hood after the run to let engine heat out of the compartment. Reason?
The heat spilling out of the tire wells will warm up the front tires and give you a false reading. Once tires are stabilized, take your readings and set your pressures.
This is the ONLY way to properly set your tire pressures.
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Old 10-05-2016, 07:00 PM   #13
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You start the day before the sun gets onto your tires, by checking your tire pressure and adjusting them for the day. We started out at our home in Atlanta with the days still in the 80s. Early in the morning however it was still 72F. Passing thru SC to WV and on up to Niagra Falls the morning temp was 49F. Yes the tires were now low, and I adjusted them to the pressures I consider optimum for each axle. As I head back to Atlanta the temps will start to match those I saw earlier in Niagra. But when I head for Sarasota in February, I might have to let a little air out by the time I get to St. Pete, as I will have outrun both winter and autumn temps.
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Old 10-05-2016, 07:04 PM   #14
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I'm an every morning checker. The only way I would ever know if something has punctured a tire is to check for a slow leak/air loss. I don't have a tire pressure monitor for the trailer.

I also do a visual check of the tires every time I stop during the day.

Have not need to add any air since June. Traveled across the USA since then, and back.
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