Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2016, 02:01 PM   #15
2 Rivet Member
 
Barbieri's Avatar
 
2004 30' Classic
San Antonio , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 76
I have Carlisle tires at 225 75 R15 rated at 80 psi. I set it at 80 as per side of tire and factory rep. There is no need to change pressure because the wiggle room is built into the tire. I live in Texas, and temperature changes in winter alone would drive me crazy to have to check tire pressure every morning. I just finished a 15000 mile trip and had no problems. Get off the Goodyear Marathon tires. They are garbage.
__________________

__________________
Barbieri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 05:00 AM   #16
4 Rivet Member
 
1967 26' Overlander
Spartanburg , South Carolina
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barbieri View Post
I have Carlisle tires at 225 75 R15 rated at 80 psi. I set it at 80 as per side of tire and factory rep. There is no need to change pressure because the wiggle room is built into the tire. I live in Texas, and temperature changes in winter alone would drive me crazy to have to check tire pressure every morning. I just finished a 15000 mile trip and had no problems. Get off the Goodyear Marathon tires. They are garbage.
Be careful what you say. I have run Marathons now for more than 15 years in all kinds of conditions with no problems whatsoever. They are definitely NOT garbage. I am a retired engineer from the textile industry with no connection to GoodYear at all.
__________________

__________________
Jacob D is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 06:28 AM   #17
Rivet Master
 
paiceman's Avatar

 
2017 30' Classic
Upper St Clair , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1,605
Images: 1
I also have the 16" Michelins and have had them on several AS trailers. We had our 2017 Classic at the factory and they asked if I wanted the tires set to what they recommend of 80# per tire. I told them thanks, but no, I run at 75# per tire, never had a rivet pop and nothing is out of place in the trailer, when I ran our other AS at 80# I had a few rivets pop etc.

I do check each day with a TST monitoring system and if more than 3# low I add air. I do carry a 6 gallon compressor and fill both trailer and truck from the bed of the truck.

Bud
__________________
SAFE TRAVELS

Bud & Alice (Bud posts)
Abby- Black Lab-TDI Certified
Hopey-Yellow Lab-TDI Certified
2017 30' Classic
2015 F350 6.7 Diesel Crew Cab
USAF - Military Training Instructor (TI) - 68-72
paiceman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 07:40 AM   #18
Rivet Master
 
dkottum's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 6,946
In the seven years of travel all over the country many times with our Airstreams we have never needed to add air during a trip. I don't recall adding air to a tire during the trip in 50 years of cross-country travel.

We no longer use TPMS on our Airstream, are these things leaking air? Why would a good tire lose air during a trip?
__________________
Doug and Cheryl
2012 FC RB, Michelin 16, ProPride 1400
2016 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4X4 Ecodiesel 3.92 axles

The Truth is More Important Than the Facts
dkottum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2016, 10:57 PM   #19
Rivet Master
 
Ravenna , Ohio
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
What kind of tires do you have, and what is the recommended tire pressure on the tires' sidewalls?

Assuming you stop for the night, you should check the tire pressures every morning when they are cold (which is ambient temperature for the locality). This is a good habit to get into, regardless of air temp and different climates on the road.

Top up to 65 [or AS recommended pressure] if necessary, and keep your speed under 65 as well for ST tires.

X2

Those suggesting to leave the tire pressure low are effectively telling you to run the tires overloaded and/or with higher Interply Shear forces that can lead to tread/belt separation tire failures.

Towables should alway set the "cold" ambient tire pressure to the tire sidewall to keep Interply Shear as low as possible no matter the type or size tires you run.
__________________
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 10:57 PM   #20
3 Rivet Member
 
Adiredneck's Avatar
 
2014 27' FB Classic
Vicksburg , Mississippi
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 171
OK, I guess I've been doing this wrong for years? I thought that the "cold" tire pressure was at 70 degrees, and before the tire was driven. So, I faithfully would set tire pressures to specs at as close to 70 degrees as Mississippi weather would allow (you gotta get up pretty early in summer...)

We just got back from a 3400 mile round trip to northern NYS. I carefully set all truck tires (Firestone Transforce) and AS tires (16" Michelin XPS Rib) to their max weight/inflation rating at 80 psi at 70 degrees. While driving up, temps averaged 85+ degrees in the South; and at 67mph the TPMS showed the psi increase to around 88 lbs on all tires. However, having set everything at these specs, I did not increase the pressure when we got North and cold temps were in the 40s - which dropped psi to around 72 lbs per tire.

So, from what I read here, 70 degrees has nothing to do with "cold" temp and I should fill to 80 psi regardless of whether it is 40 degrees or 70 degrees? This past Thursday tire and ambient temps were 37 degrees when we left Maryland and 88 by the time we got to Alabama that afternoon. If we set it at 80 psi @ 37 degrees, wouldn't there be some very high pressures due to rolling on 90 degree roads by afternoon?

I guess I need some "re-education"...

Tim
__________________
"Hot meals, cold beer, dry bed & flush toilet - everything I look for in a wilderness experience..."
Adiredneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2016, 11:39 PM   #21
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 5,812
Images: 13
Cold pressure means an undriven tire for many hours. Morning would be the best.

In Phoenix there are times in June to July that the outside air temps never get in double digits! Even at night to early morning the outside air temp is over 100! So setting the tire presure at 70 degrees is not possible. Same would be true for North Dakota in February!

Cold tire pressure would be an undriven tire. Set correctly on a cold tire and leave it alone until some other morning. And for those of you that have remote pressure gauge or check after the tire is driven, yes the pressure went up. Or down or sideways. No do not let air out or change the pressure, it's a hot tire. Reset the pressure the next morning if it is not at the proper psi.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 01:52 PM   #22
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Corpus Christi , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 6,472
Images: 1
Tire pressure on the road

Tire pressure on truck is too high. Stay with door sticker range. Per our contributing tire engineers, testing done by about 2009 is safety (not so much ride) oriented.

Best is to get actual per wheel scale readings. Heaviest wheel position on an axle determines cross axle tire pressure.

Tire pressure too high reduces braking efficiency and handling on the truck. No good reason to overinflate (maybe 5-psi). See load and pressure tables, BUT stay within Dodge pressure range.

Per tire engineer CapriRacer, test is after about 90-minutes of highway travel. Glide into rest area and come to stop with minimal service brake use. If pressure rise from cold is 5-7% you're good. If it's 10% add 5-psi and test again next trip same way.

Full pressure on TT tires is correct. Check hub temps when stopped.

Travel and direct sunlight heat the tires. So, best to check in early morning. That's the reference. I may add air during the day, but in the morning make correction.

It's also the time to tighten lug nuts on TT. Before every move.

You want to be serious, get a calibrated air pressure gauge. Longacre Racing. Switz found a second at a reduced price.

Not directly related, but a Panhard Rod on the rear axle (Henderson's Lineup) will keep body from moving side to side. Reduces tire workload (and improves handling).

Grease able polyurethane bushings on the anti-roll bars means they'll react more quickly, taking strain off the tires.

I'll say the same for KONI FSD shocks (same source) as these were originally spec'd for first responder vehicles (and motor homes). Whatever reduces outside influence on the tires means an easier life for them. Less heat build during day. Better ride as well.

Finally, balancing the tire/wheel assembly on a Hunter GSP-9700 to the same spec as required on Mercedes. And, Centramatic balancers on truck and trailer (only will fit rear on my Dodge; would require grinding calipers on front).

IOW, get the TV tire pressure as low as they'll go per testing and recommended range. Steering and handling will be improved.

A VPP style hitch is what really takes the strain off of TV and TT tires. Still needs to be set up properly, though.



1990 35' Silver Streak
2004 555 Cummins
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 10-cpm solo, 18-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 09:29 PM   #23
Rivet Master
 
Ravenna , Ohio
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 589
Comments in RED

QUOTE=slowmover;1865960]Tire pressure on truck is too high. Stay with door sticker range. Per our contributing tire engineers, testing done by about 2009 is safety (not so much ride) oriented.

Door sticker is reasonable suggestion from car manufacturer but is based on estimates on how much stuff you carry.

Best is to get actual per wheel scale readings. Heaviest wheel position on an axle determines cross axle tire pressure. This is correct for motorized vehicles

Tire pressure too high reduces braking efficiency and handling on the truck. No good reason to overinflate (maybe 5-psi). See load and pressure tables, BUT stay within Dodge pressure range.

Per tire engineer CapriRacer, test is after about 90-minutes of highway travel. Glide into rest area and come to stop with minimal service brake use. If pressure rise from cold is 5-7% you're good. If it's 10% add 5-psi and test again next trip same way.

Full pressure on TT tires is correct. Yes this will lower the Interply Shear forces. Check hub temps when stopped.

Travel and direct sunlight heat the tires. So, best to check in early morning. That's the reference. I may add air during the day, but in the morning make correction.

It's also the time to tighten lug nuts on TT. Before every move.

You want to be serious, get a calibrated air pressure gauge. Longacre Racing. Switz found a second at a reduced price.

I have found the Accutire MS-4021B $12 from Amazon to be accurate to +/- 0.5 psi.


Not directly related, but a Panhard Rod on the rear axle (Henderson's Lineup) will keep body from moving side to side. Reduces tire workload (and improves handling).

Grease able polyurethane bushings on the anti-roll bars means they'll react more quickly, taking strain off the tires.

I'll say the same for KONI FSD shocks (same source) as these were originally spec'd for first responder vehicles (and motor homes). Whatever reduces outside influence on the tires means an easier life for them. Less heat build during day. Better ride as well.

Finally, balancing the tire/wheel assembly on a Hunter GSP-9700 to the same spec as required on Mercedes. And, Centramatic balancers on truck and trailer (only will fit rear on my Dodge; would require grinding calipers on front).

IOW, get the TV tire pressure as low as they'll go per testing and recommended range. Steering and handling will be improved. Not sure what this suggestion is about as improved steering usually comes with increased pressure.

A VPP style hitch is what really takes the strain off of TV and TT tires. Still needs to be set up properly, though.

1990 35' Silver Streak
2004 555 Cummins[/QUOTE]
__________________
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 10:25 PM   #24
3 Rivet Member
 
Adiredneck's Avatar
 
2014 27' FB Classic
Vicksburg , Mississippi
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 171
[QUOTE=slowmover;1865960]
A VPP style hitch is what really takes the strain off of TV and TT tires. Still needs to be set up properly, though.


Slowmover:

What is a "VPP style hitch"?

Tim
__________________
"Hot meals, cold beer, dry bed & flush toilet - everything I look for in a wilderness experience..."
Adiredneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 11:31 PM   #25
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Corpus Christi , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 6,472
Images: 1
Tire pressure on the road

Thanks Tireman9

As to suspension improvements (on a Dodge one ton) I find that at the same speeds I have less body roll. Side to side lean, as well as front to rear movement.

I can also run the same curves at somewhat higher speeds with fewer steering corrections.

I translate this as less stress on the tires when speed isn't increased due to better handling. Ditto for other suggestions.

FWIW, the first set of tires on this truck was replaced at 120k with better than 4/32s remaining. Second set showed 4 to 5 32's of wear before failure at 70k miles (wherein Michelin replaced them at less than half price within half-hour of a phone call). I might rotate at 25k intervals. Tread depth doesn't really change across the face (with the way I drive). Miles are still 50/50 streets/highways.

I'm pretty rigorous about inflation pressure versus load. Thus, a discussion by CapriRacer on the after effects of the Ford Explorer/Firestone debacle was that by 2009 it was likely that further testing resulted in a revised recommended range of pressures by vehicle manufacturers (was a wake up to me).

My truck is within 40-lbs at all corners while solo. At about 4,000-lbs per axle. Even 10-psi over "ideal" is enough to induce wheel skip or hop on poor surfaces with the rear axle (front is IFS; 2WD plus rack & pinion).

And, I've long noted that drivers of one tons are usually unfamiliar with their tendencies when towing. Loaded, and towing. Not empty, solo.

Over inflation (and especially with worm sector steering) brings steering feel to what "seems normal" is my guess. The body moving differently than the suspension.

Suspension help is a better approach.
Tires inside door sticker recommendation is closer to need, at any rate.

I'm waiting for someone to weigh the front & rear axle loads per wheel and state their own preference based on testing. I ran commercial loads in the oilfield with gooseneck trailers and grossed up to 33k. That is where full pressure (80-psi) is warranted.

VPP: Virtual Projection Point. ProPride or Hensley. (The trailer can't change course without the truck initiating the movement. Thus, the truck isn't straining against the trailers mass to keep it in alignment).



1990 35' Silver Streak
2004 555 Cummins
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 10-cpm solo, 18-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2016, 11:55 PM   #26
3 Rivet Member
 
Adiredneck's Avatar
 
2014 27' FB Classic
Vicksburg , Mississippi
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 171
Action: I lived in Glendale many years ago; so, when it comes to summer "low" temps in Phoenix, I know whereof you speak... ;-)

Slowmover and Tireman9: Thanks for the feedback. Here are the actual data and specs for my rig:

TV: 2015 Ram 3500 4x4 Club Cab with CTD and 6 spd manual; 8 ft. bed with Highway Products "Pickup Pack" mounted consisting of 2 8' side tool boxes, bed lid, and bed roller to stow all tools, gear and supplies.

Specs per door sticker:
GVWR: 12,300 lbs.
Fr. Axle: 6,000 lbs.
Rr. Axle: 7,000 lbs.

Tire PSI per sticker:
Front: 60 psi (I ran it at 80psi this trip)
Rear: 80 psi (ditto)

TV Tires: Firestone Transforce LT275/70R18 Load Range E; rated for max weight of 3640 @ 80psi.

TT: 2014 Airstream Classic 27FB, rated 9,000 lbs GVR.

TT Tires: Michelin XPS Rib LT225/75R16, Load Range E, rated for max weight of 2680 @ 80 psi. I ran them at 75 lbs for their first trip in June (well within specs for load per Michelin weight/inflation table for the tire) and 80 psi on this last trip for ride/mileage comparison. One of the reasons I spent the extra $$$ on the XPS Ribs is that they have a steel belt in the sidewall, as well as the four steel belts in the tread. My hope was that this additional sidewall reinforcement would help defend against damage from too much flexing or side-pressure while in sharp turns, and the above mentioned Interply Shear. All four TT wheels have Centramatics balancers and were spin-balanced by tire shop when they were mounted on the new Sendel rims in June. New McGard lugs are checked with torque wrench set a 110 lbs. each day before setting out, and at noon rest stop on long-haul days.

I use combination of the Milton inflator/gauge chuck on my compressor hose and Accu-Gage truck gauge when I am inflating and setting initial pressure, and keep an eye on the TV psi via the factory TPMS, and the TT psi/temp via a TST 507SE TPMS system.

I also utilize a combination of two hitch systems: An Equalizer WD/AS hitch with 1,000# bars; mounted to an AirSafe Class VI air-bag suspension hitch to soften ride for both TV and TT. Handles/rides like a charm.

CAT Scale reading from last week's trip with full fuel tank, DW, water, propane, gear and beer:

Steer Axle: 5,080 lbs.
Drive Axle: 5,580 lbs.
Trailer Axles: 6,500 lbs.
GCVW: 17,160 lbs.

In my non-expert opinion, I'm running everything well within safe capacities, capabilities and specifications. Obviously, I have tried to make my tires and running gear as safe and bullet-proof as I could, with almost all of the information learned and prejudices instilled here on the Forums. Hopefully, to prevent damage/injury to us, others, or a very expensive pair of toys - I've done as well as I could.

If you gentlemen see any glaring errors of judgement, math, or inexperience, please let me know. I am a big fan of tuition-free learning, and a bad personal experience usually comes at a high tuition cost.

Again, thanks to all who share their experiences, expertise and opinions here on the Forum - I learn something new on almost every thread!

Tim
__________________
"Hot meals, cold beer, dry bed & flush toilet - everything I look for in a wilderness experience..."
Adiredneck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2016, 12:22 AM   #27
Rivet Master

 
2007 22' International CCD
Corona , California
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2,306
[QUOTE=Adiredneck;1866191]
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowmover View Post
A VPP style hitch is what really takes the strain off of TV and TT tires. Still needs to be set up properly, though.


Slowmover:

What is a "VPP style hitch"?

Tim

Reference is to a Hensley designed pivot point projection hitch. Like a Hensley or newer design ProPride.


Sent from my pocket Internet using Airstream Forums
__________________
KE4GNK/AE
'The Silver HamShack' (2007 International 22FB CCD 75th Aniversary model)
Multiple Yaesu Radios inside and many antennae sprouting from roof, ProPride hitch
2012 shortbed crewcab 4x4 Toyota Taco TV with more antennae on it
rmkrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2016, 10:04 AM   #28
Rivet Master
 
Ravenna , Ohio
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adiredneck View Post
snip

One of the reasons I spent the extra $$$ on the XPS Ribs is that they have a steel belt in the sidewall, as well as the four steel belts in the tread. My hope was that this additional sidewall reinforcement would help defend against damage from too much flexing or side-pressure while in sharp turns, and the above mentioned Interply Shear.

snip

Tim
Suggest you re-read the tire sidewall of your XPS. Tire sidewalls do not have belts. Radial tires have belts in the tread only.

A steel body radial will have one layer or ply of steel cords running in the radial direction i.e. from bead up the sidewall to the tread, across and down the other side. So yous sidewall stamping says "Sidewall one ply steel" Steel belted radials have two or more belts which are ply at a high angle alternating up left then up right and if more belts they just keep alternating. If the tire stamping says "Tread 3 ply steel" one of the 3 is the body so such a tire would have 2 belts.

In general steel body tires are considered more like "commercial" grade tires so have a more robust construction with the associated higher costs.
__________________

__________________
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water Pressure: Shore pressure high, All pressure in trailer low.... bhooves Sinks, Showers & Toilets 9 10-16-2016 04:22 PM
High Pressure vs. Low pressure Appliances emenriquez General Appliance Topics 2 06-15-2009 02:04 AM
Tire Pressure Gauges- Pressure Varies! Ray Eklund Tires 14 07-06-2008 09:34 AM
Canadian Tire's $129 Tire Pressure Monitoring System SilverCottage Tires 9 10-30-2007 08:55 PM
Low pressure / High pressure appliances Rick LP Gas, Piping, Tanks & Regulators 1 06-15-2002 07:29 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.