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Old 05-20-2012, 06:13 PM   #29
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Maxxis Load / Inflation Chart

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Originally Posted by eldin View Post
my tire gauge reads 50 psi on maxis M8008 radial (steel belted) ST225/75R15. 25ft AS Excella. Tire decal says max PSI inflation 80PSI. Person I bought TT from says 60 PSI inflation. HELP. Live in NC summer heat Eldin 89 AS Excella 25 ft.

If you go here: http://www.maxxis.com/Repository/Files/m8008load.pdf
you will find the Maxxis inflation chart for your tires.

If the tires say they are max. inflation 80 psi, that leads to conclusion that they are load range E tires. At 80 psi, they'll carry 2,830 lbs. EACH - I didn't look up what your trailer weighs, but GVW for it has to be WAY below 11,320 lbs. (2,830 * 4). Thus, at 80 psi inflation, you won't tend to get overheat blowouts, but your trailer is gonna' take a pounding.

If it were my trailer, I'd either a.) call Airstream for a recommended inflation pressure with those tires, or b.) back the pressure down a bit, more in line with the load they're being asked to carry and see how the tread wears and whether the trailer is starting to suffer damage.
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Old 05-21-2012, 06:42 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldin View Post
my tire gauge reads 50 psi on maxis M8008 radial (steel belted) ST225/75R15. 25ft AS Excella. Tire decal says max PSI inflation 80PSI. Person I bought TT from says 60 PSI inflation. HELP. Live in NC summer heat Eldin 89 AS Excella 25 ft.
Eldin, the 80 psi maximum ratings means you have Load Range E tires (used to be called 10 ply). Tire pressure should be enough to carry the weight each tire supports. Too much pressure for the weight will result in wearing the center of the tire tread faster than the sides. Too little will wear the sides of the tread faster. There are tread depth gauges available to measure this for around $10.

There are tables on various websites (Tire Rack is one) that tell you how much weight each tire supports for a given pressure. You can find on the weight of the trailer in a couple of places on newer trailers—often on the inside of a wardrobe door and on a plate on the lower side of the trailer—near the front. Some tire store chains have info on their websites too.

Or call the tire manufacturer to get recommendations for how much pressure each tire should have. Have the loaded weight (GVWR) of the trailer and exact name and dimensions of the tire ready. Don't be surprised if they aren't sure either.

You will get recommendations to have from 50 to 80 lbs. in the tires from various Forum members. Tire pressure is debated frequently on this Forum.

I think the tire tread depth tells you whether what you have been doing is working, but doing the research on weight vs. tire pressure helps you make a decision beforehand.

Tire pressure is different for every tire and every trailer combination.

Gene
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