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Old 08-02-2011, 07:11 PM   #15
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Ignore the plate and follow the tire. The air pressure depends on the load range and the weight each tire is carrying. I have Goodyear Marathons Load Range D and I run them at 70 PSI. The side wall says 65 Max. However, Goodyear has a supplemental document that says you can at higher pressures. If I run them at 65 they wear as if under inflated. That means they are running hotter than they should.
This is good advice - if the tire is running hot, it's underinflated. If you start seeing wear in the middle of the tire, it's overinflated.

The B190 requires the rear tires to be at 80 PSI because there's 6,000 lbs sitting on that rear axle...and each tire is good for about 3,000 lbs at 80 PSI. I watch that pretty religiously, after destroying one by having it underinflated.
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Old 08-02-2011, 08:02 PM   #16
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Michelle is absolutely correct on this. When truckers start getting hot tires, they add air! I have seen people underinflate and get side wall blowouts. Inflate the tires to max cold pressure everytime you leave on a trip (and or check at reasonable intervals if you are gone for more than a week) and the only thing you will have to worry about is road hazards.

A max cold tire pressure will NOT harm your trailer!
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Old 08-02-2011, 09:10 PM   #17
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Tire Pressure

I have a 1984 31 foot Excella that is probally a carbon copy of yours (center bath/rear bed).
Mine weighs 8,000 lbs (3100 on each axle and 800 on the tongue).
That you have 700x15s to me means that you probally have LT tires just that they are bias ply but probally have a speed rating.
All that being said, I run 60 PSI in my LT225/75R16s.
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Old 08-02-2011, 09:27 PM   #18
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Learn something new every day.... 60psi=70psi.
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:20 PM   #19
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We just had our tires rotated after 5k miles, and on direct questioning, the tech. advised that we should always run the tires at their max. rated pressures, regardless of weight, because the more under inflated the tires are from their max. psi, the hotter they will become. So I always run at max. psi...cold....measured in the am.

And NEVER let air out of a hot tire.....

We use a tire pressure monitoring system (Truck Monitoring System) and it is more accurate than my pencil pressure gauge..In the morning I just look at the monitor in the truck, and it saves me the inconvenience of having to check each tire before departure.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:09 PM   #20
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[QUOTE=Zigidachs;1027220] And NEVER let air out of a hot tire.....

...blow on it 'til it cools down..

Then check it with the sooper accurate "tire monitor".
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:46 PM   #21
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Every day that we are planning to tow, we start each day with a tire pressure check. I usually get to the tires before the sunshine does. I set the tire pressure to the max cold pressure setting for both tow vehicle and trailer. Once underway, I check the pressures at meal stops. I never reduce air pressure and fortunately have not had to add air to increase pressures during a travel day.

Last year when we moved cross country, we took the path less traveled. Lots of elevation change and temperature differences on some rough 2-lane roads. We weighed 20k pounds, riding on 10 tires.

Some mornings I reduced air pressure, some mornings I added air pressure. Always, the tires were at ambient temperature when I checked. One day, we saw ambient air temps rise from 32*F to 120*F on the same day in less than 3 hours driving time. We remained in over 100*F temp for several hours the rest of that day. One morning, ambient air temp at 6am was nearly 100*F.

We had no tire problems on the trip. HTH.
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Old 08-03-2011, 09:47 AM   #22
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Just did a 1200 miles out and back and read this forum thread prior. Inflated my almost new (2008 25' Classic) Goodyears and the left rear disintegrated almost home yesterday. Pressures were bang on 65 psi.

How long do these usually last and any other Goodyear issues? Also found out A/S provides no jack and no lug wrench.....live and learn.

Cheers, Ron
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Old 08-03-2011, 11:58 AM   #23
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First of all, the plate on the trailer that says 45 psi probably means the original tires were Load Range C. They have lower maximum pressures. Now that you have LR D tires, the max, depending on the manufacturer, will be 65 or near that.

Note that on your car or truck, the tires will state a maximum psi, but the decal on the door frame will have a lower psi. The maximum psi is for when the vehicle is maxed out in its GVWR and the weight of the fully loaded car or truck equals the maximum weight rating for the tire. When you load up a pickup with bricks or cement bags, you have to increase the pressure in the tires to carry the weight.

When tires are overinflated, the center of the tread bulges and wears faster. When underinflated, the center cups inward and the edges wear faster. You can buy a tread depth gauge and check the tires periodically to see how they are wearing. If they wear on one side of the tread only, that tells you they could be out of balance.

We have LR E tires on the trailer and run them at 68 psi. That is not maximum pressure (80 or 85 depending on manufacturer) and they are wearing evenly and we have no problems. I looked at all the statistics for the tire to determine the proper psi for them considering the weight of the trailer, and then I spoke with Michelin about it, and came to the conclusion that this was the right pressure. It is actually a little more than necessary because I like a slightly overinflated tire for a margin or error. Michelin never said I had to run the tire at maximum pressure all the time. If Carlisle recommends that, I'd buy another brand.

We do not have sway problems either. If higher pressure in the tires reduces or eliminates sway problems, maybe the source of the problem is the hitch. Increasing tire pressure may be a band aid that solves sway for a while, but may wear the tires unevenly.

I think that running your new LR D tires at 45 to 50 psi would probably be fine given the weight of your trailer hasn't increased and the characteristics of your tires allow it. But check the weight of the trailer vs. the tire weight ratings. The numbers you cite for your tires indicate bias ply tires, not radials, and the answers may be different for them. I haven't used bias plies for decades upon decades, but every tire supports a given amount of weight depending on air pressure inside. Those numbers are available on a number of websites and helps determine how much air to put in them.

Underinflation is frequently said on this Forum to be a very bad thing. I agree. Overinflation leads to uneven tread wear and a harsh ride, something your trailer does not like. Underinflation is probably worse than overinflation, but neither is good.

There are many threads on tires. It is a subject of endless debate. Use the search function to find some and entertain (or frustrate) yourself and maybe after a while you will make a decision that makes sense for and to you.

Gene
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Old 08-03-2011, 12:26 PM   #24
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Just did a 1200 miles out and back and read this forum thread prior. Inflated my almost new (2008 25' Classic) Goodyears and the left rear disintegrated almost home yesterday. Pressures were bang on 65 psi.

How long do these usually last and any other Goodyear issues? Also found out A/S provides no jack and no lug wrench.....live and learn.

Cheers, Ron
I can relate. Last week verified 64-65 psi all the way around prior to leaving out for WDW Ft. Wilderness - 40 miles into the trip and less than one hour later.... -Chris
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Old 08-03-2011, 12:37 PM   #25
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I always carry a 4 way lug wrench in our trucks and made sure that one end fit the trailer. I also carry an extra bottle jack for the trailer although I also have scrap wood to pull up the trailer so the bad tire is off the ground. The bottle jack would be necessary if all the tires on one side blew or I didn't want to hitch up the trailer.

Chris, were those Marathons?

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Old 08-03-2011, 12:43 PM   #26
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Chris, were those Marathons?

Gene
Gene,
Yes, they are GYMs with a mfg date of Nov 2010 (USA). I have about 3,000 miles on the new trailer. Moved the GYM off the spare and to put back on the trailer wheel. Couldn't locate a GYM when this occured so I had to settle on a Towmaster to put back on the spare wheel.

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Old 08-03-2011, 01:48 PM   #27
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There is proper inflation, care, viglance, fussiness, etc. on tire care and pressure. Then there are occasional defective tires. Defective trumps careful! Have talked to many caravaners and there have been a awful lot of failed ST tires for whatever reasons. Hard to belive it is low pressure when these guys run TPS and are out checking air every morning.
That is why I run Michlen LT tires.
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Old 08-03-2011, 02:03 PM   #28
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There is proper inflation, care, viglance, fussiness, etc. on tire care and pressure. Then there are occasional defective tires. Defective trumps careful! Have talked to many caravaners and there have been a awful lot of failed ST tires for whatever reasons. Hard to belive it is low pressure when these guys run TPS and are out checking air every morning.
That is why I run Michlen LT tires.
Me too.

Gene
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