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Old 11-23-2008, 05:22 PM   #1
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Tire Pressure

I always thought that if I filled my tires at the recommended tire pressure while cold, I was good to go, at least for the day. Lately, however, I have read some posts where people fill their tires to the recommended inflation while cold, yet check the pressure again while warm, and make adjustments. Is this really necessary?

I did some testing and filled my tires to 65 PSI this morning at about 40 degrees farenheit. This afternoon, after warming up to 65 degrees, I rechecked and they were 70 PSI. The way I see it, this allowance for pressure difference is built into the recommendation so I don't need to worry about it, and as long as if I check the tire pressure at 40 degrees the next day, and it's still 65 PSI, I'm OK.

Does Mongo's logic need rethinking?
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Old 11-23-2008, 05:36 PM   #2
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I do much the same. I fill them cold and check them cold.

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Old 11-23-2008, 06:15 PM   #3
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It is not a bad idea to recheck your tires as the seasons change but within a given season there is no need to check them with a given day between morning and afternoon.

Have I not you are inflating your tires to 65 lbs. Unless you have a single axle trailer this is most likely over inflated. Tires should be set by load not by the legal number stamped on the sidewall.

The attached chart will give you correct inflation for a given axle load
http://www.goodyear.com/rv/pdf/rv_inflation.pdf

While in general each manufacture has the same inflation for the same size and rated tire it is a good idea to get the chart directly from your manufacture.

Don't go to a tire dealer for this because they will not even know what it is.
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Old 11-23-2008, 06:51 PM   #4
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Check and adjust inflation in the morning, then you can check throughout the day. But, DO NOT reduce the tire pressure over the course of the day, just monitor to make sure no one tire is drastically lower than the others. Tires will increase pressure as they warm up, if you reduce pressure to cold amount when warm, it will probably be badly underinflated when cold.
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Old 11-23-2008, 10:07 PM   #5
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I had the understanding that checking the tire pressure when "cold" really has less to do with the actual air temperature and more to do with checking the pressure "before driving" (as in when the tires are not warmed from driving on them). We check before we travel (and I try to check then while in the shade if possible, especially in SoAZ), but we do not decrease tire pressures while we travel...the increase in pressure due to travel (for us usually 4-6 lbs) is taken into consideration by the manufacturer... We use PressurePro tire pressure monitors so we can push the button and get a tire pressure reading at any point in transit...
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Old 11-24-2008, 01:07 AM   #6
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"Cold" tire pressure is considered to be before driving, no matter how "cold" (or not) it is outside.
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Old 11-25-2008, 07:53 AM   #7
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'round these parts, in may be June or July cold tires could be in the triple digits temp. before driving.

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Old 11-25-2008, 09:14 AM   #8
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Many individuals are of the opinion that a lower tire pressure results in an over heated tire that fails in a blow out and thus tend to grossly over inflate their tires. Yes under inflation will cause a tire to fail do to heat build up. However that is not a reason to Over Inflate a tire.

If you look at the inflation chart I post above you will see that the tires I use on my trailer LT 225 75 16 has an inflation range of from 35 to 80 lbs. Based on the weight of my trailer I inflate them to 40 lbs. If I were to inflate then to the 80 lbs. printed on the side of the tire I would not have a dish or glass when I got to the campground.

As for tire temperature when properly inflated. My tires generally run at 105 degrees F on the shaded side and 110 degrees on the sunny side on a hot summer day while starting out at 40 lbs.

Unless you have a known leaker there should be no reason to have to check your tires more often than once month or when subject to a significant ambient temperature as in a seasonal change.
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Old 11-25-2008, 11:33 AM   #9
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Manufacturers tire pressures are stated cold -- 4-hours after driving minimum, overnight preferable -- and the "coldest" point is around dawn. Adjusting pressure at this point is the recommendation. Adjusting pressure during a break in driving is at least inaccurate, at worst counter-productive.

Along with the pressure gauge, one may use an IR thermometer to measure tire sidewall temps during the driving day, looking for significant differences among TT or TV tires. This is a better manner of spending time on "maintenance" issues than messing with accurately-set tire pressures (+/- 1/2-lb of target).
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Old 11-25-2008, 12:04 PM   #10
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Every tire is designed to work with a certain amount of flex. Too hard, and you have a hard ride and poor traction for braking and cornering. Too soft and you have danger of accelerated wear, overheating, and possibly a blowout.

You need to have the appropriate pressure to support the weight on it. More weight, more pressure. Less weight, less pressure.

Too much pressure is safer than too little.

All tire manufacturers recommend setting tire pressure cold, meaning before driving. As you drive the tire will heat up and pressure will rise. If it does DO NOT adjust the pressure (down). Leave them alone. The extra few pounds will do no harm.
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Old 11-25-2008, 12:30 PM   #11
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I fill my tires to about 5 lbs less then tire sidewall says. That is what I feel comfortable with.

Underinflated tires I think are more dangerouse then slighly over filled tires. Because they will build heat.

In drag racing application. I set the slicks at 7psi then after I do my burn out and make a pass my pressure is up to as much as 15 psi. I let them back down to 7 psi and they are fine for the rest of the day, but I still check them.

I bet trailer tire pressure would rise from morning to mid day sun and heat.

I dont think there is a right answer. just my opinion
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Old 11-25-2008, 01:36 PM   #12
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Don't use drag tires as a model for maintence on trailer tires. In fact trailer tires may have enough difference in usage that they operate at temps different than the TV.

Interesting comment from HowieE above. Most of my trailer tires operate at a level of 85 to 90 of capacity all the time. So the inflation I use is the max. Tire pressures need to be matched to load ratings of the tires.

Where as my TV and car almost never have a full load. Only when towing does the TV get any where near the max load of the tires.

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Old 11-25-2008, 02:59 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Action View Post
Interesting comment from HowieE above. Most of my trailer tires operate at a level of 85 to 90 of capacity all the time. So the inflation I use is the max. Tire pressures need to be matched to load ratings of the tires.
I think you missed my point.

Tires pressure should be matched to the "LOAD" not the load rating. The load rating is the designed MAX tire pressure at MAX load for that tire.

Yes if one were to run a C rated tire on a trailer the tire pressure would most likely be close to the Max rating printed on the sidewall. In fact the max for a C rated tire is 55 lbs. and that would be at the limit under a 7.700 lbs. trailer with 4 tires. However if you are running E rated tires under the same trailer you would still inflate to 50 lbs. even though the tire has a max pressure of 80 lbs. My trailer with those same E rated tires and weighing 8,500 lbs and 6 tires calls for only 35 lbs.

Now I do put 40 lbs. in my tires only to give a margin of safety if I had to run in on 5 tires.
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Old 11-25-2008, 03:57 PM   #14
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Quote:
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Have I not you are inflating your tires to 65 lbs. Unless you have a single axle trailer this is most likely over inflated. Tires should be set by load not by the legal number stamped on the sidewall.
I use 65 PSI in my tires because that is the tire pressure that Airstream recommends for my particular tire/trailer combination. It is stamped into a small plaque on the side of my trailer. I have a heavy trailer because of the slideout.
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