Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2012, 11:34 AM   #1
1 Rivet Member
 
1967 26' Overlander
TOME , New Mexico
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 8
Tire cost

I need an idea of tire cost (5 new total) for my 67 Overlander. And any recommendations on brand and type would be appreciated! Thanks!
__________________

__________________
guadalupegrl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 12:56 PM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
overlander64's Avatar
 
1964 26' Overlander
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Anna , Illinois
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,396
Images: 183
Send a message via Yahoo to overlander64
Tire cost

Greetings guadalupegrl!

Quote:
Originally Posted by guadalupegrl View Post
I need an idea of tire cost (5 new total) for my 67 Overlander. And any recommendations on brand and type would be appreciated! Thanks!
Depending upon where you shop, typical trailer (ST) tires for your Overlander will run somewhere between $400 and $500. You will typically be looking at ST 225 75 R 15 special trailer tires (ST) in at least load range C or load range D. I utilize load range D on my Overlander, but load range C do have adequate load carrying capacity for the typical mid-1960s Overlander. Something to double-check on your coach is whether its current wheels are split-rim or today's one-piece steel wheels. Split-rims are considered by most to be obsolete and most tire stores will not install new tires on such rims. Another thing to kept in mind is that many reocmmend against stwiching to load range D tires if load range C tires are currently installed on the coach . . . I installed new wheels when I switched from load range C to load range D on my Overlander.

You may find yourself entering the tire market with trepidation if you read the thread here on the Forums regarding ST tires, particularly the Good Year Marathons made in China. Good Year Marathons were the only tires that I utilized on my travel trailers from 1980 - 2008, and I never had a problem that was the fault of the tire. In 2008, my Good Year dealer was out of stock on Marathons and tried to sell me an off-brand tire made in China . . . so I went to another local shop where I was able to purchase Carlisle trailer tires in ST 224 75 R 15 load range D. I have utilized the Carlisle tires for four seasons, and again, have had no problems with these tires . . . and they have maintained a consistent pressure better than any of my Good Year Marathons.

Today, there is a growing movement to utilize light truck tires, designated LT on Airstreams. These tires can be difficult to find in sizes appropriate for our Airstreams, but can be found with dilligent searching. The one advantage that is significant for some is that the speed rating is greater than the 65 MPH that is typical for ST tires . . . excess speed with ST tires can increase temperatures leading to early catastrophic failures. I prefer to travel secondary routes to see more of the country so my trailers rarely see speeds greater than 55 MPH.

Good luck with your Overlander!

Kevin

P.S.: Regardless of the tires that you choose to have installed, I would suggest insisting upon steel valve stems for their added durability.

You don't necessarily need a spare tire with a tandem axle Airstream. It is possible to remove the failed tire and rim, then proceed at reduced speed to a shop where the tire can be replaced. You don't need to jack up the coach to change a tire either . . . just roll the good wheel/tire up on several 2" x6" planks and the flat can be removed without the worries of jacking.

Should you find that you need new wheels, the following may be of help:

The specifications for Airstream wheels was fairly consistent from the 1960s through at least the 1990s. The standard wheel rim was typically:
  • 15"x6"
  • zero offset
  • 6 lug pattern
  • 5.5" spacing
  • center bore measuring 4.245 inches
  • rated at 2,600 pounds
The wheel is a comparatively common trailer applications. My local Good Year tire dealer stocked new rims having the correct specifications as did a horse trailer dealer and an agricultural trailer dealer. New rims from either of the three sources that I tried were less than $15.00 per wheel more for a brand new known quality wheel compared to a salvage yard wheels that could be in less than optimum condition. The center bore diameter can also pose problems as many otherwise compatible salvage yard wheels will have center bores that are too small and prove problematic when trying to mount the wheels/tires. The usual tire size recommended today is an ST or LT 225 75 R 15 in at least load range C or no more than load range D on a Vintage coach.
__________________

__________________
Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI (Lifetime Member)/VAC/Free Wheelers #6359
AIR #827
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban (7400 VORTEC/4.11 Differentials)
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre/1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible (8.2 Liter V8/2.70 Final Drive)
overlander64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2012, 04:04 PM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
1955 22' Flying Cloud
mapleton , Utah
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 464
Hi Guadalupegirl and welcome. I see from your other thread that you are also considering doing some serious interior modifications. You might want to decide where you are heading with this trailer before you invest in new tires and wheels. If you decide to camp a few times before you start serious work then by all means go ahead and replace now, but if you decide to do some work first you might as well leave the old tires in place as long as they hold air. Why have brand new tires sitting on an unused trailer? the tires have a finite lifespan so buy them when just about everything else is ready to go and you will get more use out of them
tim
__________________
rumrunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 07:25 AM   #4
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
Very good suggestion above. Especially in the SW sun of the summer.

>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2012, 07:45 AM   #5
Site Team
 
Aage's Avatar
 
1974 31' Sovereign
Ottawa , ON
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 11,204
Images: 25
Things to ponder

hi, guadgrl!

One small but important item to note when purchasing new tires: have a look at the date code which is stamped into the actual tires you are buying to make sure that they aren't already a few years old. I have heard it said here that they should be replaced at five years old, so the clock is ticking before you buy them.

Ask to see all five tires' codes before they go on your trailer, since on many tires, they will be hidden by the metal rim of your wheel, once installed.

And as mentioned above, since you are replacing them all, it's time to look at your wheels' "bling effect". Decorative polished wheels aren't all that much more money than regular steel ones that you have to put hubcaps onto, but have h-u-g-e potential to brighten up the looks of your TT.

You might be able to make a good package deal if you buy wheels, tires, and installation from the same dealer, but don't feel you have to. Good tire shops can assemble them and balance them for you from wheels and tires you bought at different places.

Good luck with your investment!
__________________
Aage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 10:32 AM   #6
3 Rivet Member
 
Vintage Kin Owner
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aage View Post
hi, guadgrl!

Ask to see all five tires' codes before they go on your trailer, since on many tires, they will be hidden by the metal rim of your wheel, once installed.

And as mentioned above, since you are replacing them all, it's time to look at your wheels' "bling effect". Decorative polished wheels aren't all that much more money than regular steel ones that you have to put hubcaps onto, but have h-u-g-e potential to brighten up the looks of your TT.

You might be able to make a good package deal if you buy wheels, tires, and installation from the same dealer, but don't feel you have to. Good tire shops can assemble them and balance them for you from wheels and tires you bought at different places.

Good luck with your investment!
Great point on the age of the tires. But personally I would stick with period correct steel wheels and hubcaps over modern custom wheels that might be out of style when you sell.
__________________

__________________
Ian Lomax
1966 Streamline Countess 26'
JeweloJalopy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.