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Old 11-26-2011, 08:07 AM   #1
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ST vs LT tires

I read somewhere that ST trailer tires are rated for 65 MPH and LT truck tires are rated for 95 MPH. I also read a post on another forum from a guy who was having lots of tire problems on a heavy fifth-wheel, even though he was cautious about his weight and speed. He switched to from 15" ST's to 16" LT's and his problems disappeared.
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Old 11-26-2011, 08:57 AM   #2
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I have 15" my AS and wanted to know what's the advantage of changing to 16"?

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Originally Posted by Phil&Sher View Post
I read somewhere that ST trailer tires are rated for 65 MPH and LT truck tires are rated for 95 MPH. I also read a post on another forum from a guy who was having lots of tire problems on a heavy fifth-wheel, even though he was cautious about his weight and speed. He switched to from 15" ST's to 16" LT's and his problems disappeared.
I have to tell you this forum is the greatest thing, next to being on the road and looking in your mirror and seeing your Airstream behind you!!!

I have been reading all the Tire posts the past few days and have decided to go from my factory ST's to the LT's as they seem to stand up better.

What is the advantage of changing from a 15" tire to 16" tire?

Many thanks,
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Old 11-26-2011, 09:40 AM   #3
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Well, I'm certainly no tire expert, but I presume that since wheel RPM would be less for a given speed, the tire temps would be lower (sidewalls flexing less). Of course, you'd have to buy 16" wheels and be sure that they'd fit your trailer.

We've only had our (used) trailer for a few months, but the dealer replaced a couple of the Goodyear Marathons prior to delivery due to sidewall bulges on tires that were only a couple of years old.

I keep my towing speed about 60MPH and check the tire pressures daily. No problems so far in about 1k miles, but if any crop up, I'll be switching to 16" LT's.
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:13 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil&Sher
... you'd have to buy 16" wheels and be sure that they'd fit your trailer...
Don't forget the spare... A less expensive steel wheel with the proper bolt pattern and offset would suffice for spare duty.
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:20 AM   #5
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Oops! I forgot about that. Also, my 15" spare fits pretty snugly as it is. I might have to consider the profile of the 16-inch spare if I don't want to carry the spare on the roof
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Old 11-26-2011, 11:52 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whirlaway

I have to tell you this forum is the greatest thing, next to being on the road and looking in your mirror and seeing your Airstream behind you!!!

I have been reading all the Tire posts the past few days and have decided to go from my factory ST's to the LT's as they seem to stand up better.

What is the advantage of changing from a 15" tire to 16" tire?

Many thanks,
There are no 15" LTs out there. Gotta go 16".
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Old 11-26-2011, 11:59 AM   #7
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Let me ask this....I've been trying to figure out what to do for a spare. Space in the carrier is a concern, cost is a concern since I don't want to do a 5tire rotation. I have found an inexpensive steel wheel of the proper specs but no inexpensive LT or other high load rated tire at 29.5" diameter.
Then I asked myself, if it's ok to drive to the next tire store on 3 wheels (4th, flat, removed), then why can't you use the stock 15" spare to get to the next tire store? I understand why you wouldn't travel long distances this way, but it is an EMERGENCY spare only for my use.
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Old 11-26-2011, 12:41 PM   #8
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I changed to Michelin LT 16" ... best upgrade decision ever! Spare fits fine. Search threads there is a lot of information on this subject here, especially during 2010-2011.
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Old 11-26-2011, 01:40 PM   #9
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Generally speaking, ST tires are junk. In Lucy's first 54,000 miles, we went through three sets of these garbage tires. Lucy's original tires were the Goodyear Marathons. These provided us with three catastrophic failures in the first 12,000 miles. We then went to the Maxxis E's. The first set went 28,000 miles before tread separation took them out. We went with another set Maxxis. These only went 14,000 miles before tread separation got them.

I finally wised up and got Lucy a set of Michelin LT's on 16" wheels. Lucy has now gone almost 30,000 miles on these without incident. So far, so good.

Brian
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Old 11-26-2011, 03:26 PM   #10
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There are no 15" LTs out there. Gotta go 16".
I just bought four Michelin LT 15 inch tires yesterday. LTX M/S2 235 75 15 108T. There are a number of 15 inch LT tires available.
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Old 11-26-2011, 03:43 PM   #11
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16" wheels

Quote:
Originally Posted by moosetags View Post
Generally speaking, ST tires are junk. In Lucy's first 54,000 miles, we went through three sets of these garbage tires. Lucy's original tires were the Goodyear Marathons. These provided us with three catastrophic failures in the first 12,000 miles. We then went to the Maxxis E's. The first set went 28,000 miles before tread separation took them out. We went with another set Maxxis. These only went 14,000 miles before tread separation got them.

I finally wised up and got Lucy a set of Michelin LT's on 16" wheels. Lucy has now gone almost 30,000 miles on these without incident. So far, so good.

Brian
Moosetags,
Nice looking wheels, hub cover and all. Are they Al. or steel? Who makes them?
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Old 11-26-2011, 03:50 PM   #12
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I just bought four Michelin LT 15 inch tires yesterday. LTX M/S2 235 75 15 108T. There are a number of 15 inch LT tires available.
Those aren't really true LT tires. They are extra load tires in the range of load range D's. They are rated for 2183 pounds and are not enough for 30'er and IMHO a 28'er. They are probably the best choice for smaller ASes.
Perhaps I should've been more clear and said there are no LRE LT tires in 15".
I have close to 8000 lbs on the axles, hitched and ready to go. 2183 pounds max just isn't enough.
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Old 11-26-2011, 04:31 PM   #13
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This is the explanation. About 2/3 of the way down is the explanation of XL p metrics vs LTs. Also tells of reduced load maximums if used on trucks vs. Cars. How does that relate to trailers.......we'll never know, since neither XLs nor LTs are intended for trailers. What's the difference? Don't know, they both have 3 steel belts. I believe the carcass and sidewalls are much more robust in LTs vs XLs.

Tire Specs Explained: Maximum Load

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Maximum Load

A tire's maximum load is the most weight the tire is designed to carry. Since a tire's load carrying capacity is related to the tire's size and how much inflation pressure is actually used, maximum loads are rated with the tire inflated to an industry assigned inflation pressure.

Additionally, load ranges are used to separate tires that share the same physical size, but differ in strength due to their internal construction. "Higher" load ranges are used to identify tires that have a stronger internal construction, and therefore can hold more air pressure and carry more weight.

Each load range has a assigned air pressure identified in pounds per square inch (psi) at which the tire's maximum load is rated. Listed below are the air pressures at which maximum load is rated for popular P-metric and LT tires:

P-Metric Passenger Vehicle Tires
Load Ranges Abbreviated Max Load Pressure
Light Load (LL) 35 psi (240 kPa)*
Standard Load (SL) 35 psi (240 kPa)*
Extra Load (XL) 41 psi (280 kPa)*
*In an effort to internationally harmonize load ratings and ranges, recently introduced and future LL, SL and XL P-Metric sizes will use ISO/Euro-metric maximum load pressures of 36 or 42 psi
Euro-Metric Passenger Vehicle Tires
Load Ranges Abbreviated Max Load Pressure
Standard Load (SL) 36 psi (250 kPa)
Extra Load** (RF) or (XL) 42 psi (290 kPa)
**Reinforced and Extra Load nomenclature may be used interchangeably to designate heavy-duty tires
LT-Metric and Flotation Light Truck Tires
Load Range Abbreviated Max Load Pressure
Load Range B (LRB) 35 psi (240 kPa)***
Load Range C (LRC) 50 psi (350 kPa)***
Load Range D (LRD) 65 psi (450 kPa)***
Load Range E (LRE) 80 psi (550 kPa)***
Load Range F (LRF) 95 psi (650 kPa)***
***Industry standards specify selected large LT tire sizes be designed with reduced maximum load pressures
P-metric tires used on passenger cars and station wagons are rated to carry 100% of the load indicated on the tire's sidewall (or listed for the tire in industry load/inflation charts). However, if the same P-metric tires are used on light trucks, (pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles for example), their carrying capacity is reduced to 91% of the load indicated on the tire's sidewall. This reduction in load results in causing light truck vehicle manufacturers to select proportionately larger P-metric sized tires for their vehicles to help offset the forces and loads resulting from a light truck's higher center of gravity and increased possibility of being occasionally "overloaded."

For example, P235/75R15 P-metric sized, standard load tires used on cars and light trucks would be rated to carry the following maximum loads at 35 psi:

Cars Full Value 2028 lbs.
Light Trucks 9% Reduced Value 1845 lbs.

Additionally, while a tire's maximum load is the most weight the tire is designed to carry, its load carrying capacity at lower inflation pressures is proportional to how much inflation pressure is used. For example, P235/75R15 P-metric sized, standard load (SL) and extra load (XL) tires used on cars would be rated to carry the following loads at the inflation pressures indicated:

Air Pressure (psi) 20 23 26 29 32 35 38 41
P235/75R15 SL 1543 1635 1753 1852 1940 2028
P235/75R15 XL 1543 1635 1753 1852 1940 2028 2105 2183

Note: 35 psi is the assigned "maximum load" pressure for standard load tires and 41 psi is the assigned "maximum load" pressure for extra load tires.

The above chart correctly shows that an extra load tire is not rated to carry any more load than a standard load tire when both are inflated to the same pressure (up to the standard load tire's "maximum load" pressure of 35 psi). This is because a tire's load capacity is a function of its size (which determines the size of the "air chamber"), its construction (which determines how much pressure can be held) and the actual air pressure used (which determines how many air molecules are forced inside the chamber). All tires with equivalent physical dimensions carry equivalent loads (until they reach their maximum load pressure).

The tire's maximum load is indicated in relatively small sized print branded near the tire's bead (adjacent to the wheel) indicating the appropriate value. Because tires are global products, their maximum load capacity is branded on the tire in kilograms (kg) and pounds (lb). These values can also be found in the industry's tire load & inflation charts.

NOTE: P-metric and Euro-metric sized tires' "maximum load" inflation pressure may be, and often are, different that the tire's "maximum inflation pressure."
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Old 11-26-2011, 04:33 PM   #14
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Those aren't really true LT tires. They are extra load tires in the range of load range D's. They are rated for 2183 pounds and are not enough for 30'er and IMHO a 28'er. They are probably the best choice for smaller ASes.
Perhaps I should've been more clear and said there are no LRE LT tires in 15".
I have close to 8000 lbs on the axles, hitched and ready to go. 2183 pounds max just isn't enough.
I feel comfortable with the pseudo LT tires. Yes they are XL. My 31 has a dry wt of 5500 & I will never get close to 8000lbs. I leave a lot of my house at home. If I thought I had 8000 lbs I might agree with you.
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