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Old 10-23-2003, 06:49 AM   #1
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Preventing Dry-Rot~ What do u do?

I was told when I 1st got my trailer that you shouldn't park your trailer directly on asphalt, as this will speed up the dry-rotting process.

So when ever I'm going to be parked for longer than a month, I pull the trailer up on leveling blocks under all four tires. I have also put boards under each tire too.

Does this apply also when parking on cement, dirt or grass?

What do you do to prevent the dry-rotting process?

What shouldn't you do?
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Old 10-23-2003, 07:57 AM   #2
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Here are a few tips that I use (knowing that dry rot is a fact if life and that the tires should still be replaced after 2, 3 or 4 seasons)....

First, when the coach is on my driveway for extended periods of time I:

- Back the trailer on thin sheets of wood

- Cover the wheels to protect them from direct sunlight and elements

- Take fresh motor oil and coat either side of the sidewalls

Now I know some folks might not agree with the oil on the sidewalls but I saw this Discovery Channel thing a few months ago and they interviewed a detail shop....this guy applies it about 3 times between several hours and since I've done it, it works VERY well. His logic was simply that the tire is an oil based product and couldn't understand why folks put silicone on it....the tire when using oil, absorbs the oil. After about 3 applications, it has oil in the rubber area and the surface remains moist and clean (but not wet looking) for months and months! Also if the sidewalls get dirty, they clean in a SNAP!

Be careful not to get oil on or near the treads....for obvious reasons! I've since done this to all my tires on the ol' fleet of vehicles I have, each one has left me with a postive impression. One other thing is to make sure you wipe any excess that may not have been absorbed...you don't want motor oil sprayed across body panels of any vehicle as the tire rotates.....

Anyway, back to the overall list above, don't forget the others too I find they are very important too when having the unit sit for long periods. Plus the thin boards help prevent the asphalt from sinking under the tire weight. I would do the same steps on grass, cement or asphalt.

Eric
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Old 10-23-2003, 09:48 AM   #3
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Eric,

Thanks for the tip on oiling the sidewalls to keep the rubber from drying out!!!
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Old 10-23-2003, 09:58 AM   #4
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I going to try motor oil on my tractor tires. They are very expensive to replace, and I could never ware them out through the amount of use I put on them.

Jim
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Old 10-23-2003, 09:59 AM   #5
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Anytime...I was skeptical at first, but once you try it, I think you'll be very happy with the results....
Just as an update, I have yet to re-oil the sidewalls (both sides of the tire) since doing this. It's been about a month and a half and the sidewalls look amazing, even with all the gravel and dirt roads I've had to use throughout construction season out here. The car has been through the car wash about 4x too and the sidwalls just rinse right off.

Oh yea, then there is also the dry rot protection....

Eric
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Old 10-23-2003, 10:05 AM   #6
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They way I did it was after the tires were cleaned, I took some 5w30. I just took a rag, soaked it as needed (had latex gloves on my hands and would suggest you do the same--cancer and toxic stuff and all) and wiped both sides of the sidewalls.

I then made sure each side of the sidewall was throughly wet with oil. I waited about 3-4 hours for it to soak in and then came back and dabbed the excess spots off and then repeated the process. 3-4 hours later, I dabbed the excess once again.

The next day, I did the whole process one time more, dabbed up the excess and have not touched the tires since.

Now on one vehicle as a test, I did the application once, not the three times and it was a very respectable outcome, but I found that a min of 2 applications seems to work a bit better and 3 pretty much is me just being excessive (but the guy on TV did it three times too, but much shorter intervals.)

Just be very careful to dab any excess off so that the vehicle is not sprayed with oil as the wheel turn...also be careful not to get oil on your rims...I don't think you'll have issues with the tractor rims, but some of these alum/chrome rims might not like oil.....

Happy oiling....

Eric
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Old 10-23-2003, 01:04 PM   #7
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Now you have me wondering, I recall reading how race car drivers in the 20'S and 30'S would run with one wheel in the center of the lane in the oil streak to make the tires last longer

Aaron
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Old 10-23-2003, 01:22 PM   #8
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I'm glad you all fiind it useful.....I thought I was one of the last to know...you know once it's on TV, I figured the secret was out.

They didn't specify on the show what weight oil to use. I really don't think it matters, you just don't want real thick stuff like 80w oil. 5/30 is cheap, but I think 10/30 or 10/40 would work too or straight 10. My results were using 5/30 FWIW....

The tires on my Impala SS are pretty costly too. So far, so good.

Best of luck to you all...

Eric
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Old 10-23-2003, 04:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by Silvertwinkie
They didn't specify on the show what weight oil to use. I really don't think it matters, you just don't want real thick stuff like 80w oil. 5/30 is cheap, but I think 10/30 or 10/40 would work too or straight 10. My results were using 5/30 FWIW....
Eric
I suspect that good old 30-weight non-detergent might be best. I can't see where all the additives would apply when using oil in this manner.

In the Airstream manual, non-detergent oil is specified for the hitch latch. I keep a can handy for this purpose.
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Old 10-23-2003, 04:17 PM   #10
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Dry rot?

Some of the tire mfg sites say don't put any petroleum based products on tires, it dissolves the rubber. I'm just quoting them, not endorsing their obsolecence.
In the fire dept, we used brake fluid to polish tires.
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Old 10-23-2003, 04:50 PM   #11
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Just read this post, and was surfing the internet and found the RV Doctor. Read this post/question.

For what it is worth...

http://www.rvdoctor.com/rvdoctor262.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear RV Doctor,
I recently read an article you wrote regarding tire damage by ultraviolet rays; it was very informative. I was talking to another RVer recently who told me that wiping the sidewalls with transmission fluid will help prevent sidewall cracks due to ultraviolet rays. My question to you is can this be possible? He claims that the properties of transmission fluid and the tires are very similar and that's why it works. I would appreciate your comments on this since I just purchased six new tires for my rig after the originals were so cracked that I felt it would be dangerous to drive on them.

Carlo
(Las Vegas, NV)


Carlo,
Negative on the tranny fluid Carlo. This will cause the tires to dry out excessively. As the oil evaporates it will deplete all the natural surface waxes blended in during manufacture. Avoid any product that contains petroleum-based or silicone substances. There are some nice products available in the aftermarket that can block UV rays and protect against ozone damage, but they typically will leave the tires with a dull sheen rather than the nice shiny surface most people like; plus they are probably less expensive. Cover the tires when not in use. The flexing and bending they receive while driving will bring the waxes back to the surface.
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Old 10-23-2003, 05:04 PM   #12
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There was a guy I met once - who had a 1940's schoolbus with the original tires on them. He worked at General Tires for 40+ years... when I asked him what he did to keep the tires - he said put Gesso (sp) on them... same stuff you use to under coat acrylic paintings on canvas for a vibrant finish while keeping the vanvas flexible...and to slow drying time when mixed directly into the acrylic paints...remains flexible even after hardening...
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Old 10-23-2003, 05:30 PM   #13
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Thumbs up Yep...

Jody

You're right about the spelling..
GESSO

ciao
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Old 10-23-2003, 05:46 PM   #14
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Well now I'm in Doubt

I've read several articles saying oils are not good on tires. Here is an exerpt from a google search:
(motorcycle site)

Tire Care Challenge
Your bike's tires have several formidable enemies: water, formaldehyde, petroleum distillates, ultraviolet light, and ozone. Water washes away the natural oils in rubber that keep it elastic. Formaldehyde and petroleum distillates act as a solvent, eating rubber on contact. When ozone, an odorless gas which is part of the air we breathe, is combined with ultraviolet (UV) light, a reaction occurs that attacks the tire and its polymers (the agents that bind the rubber).

bold added by me...
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