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Old 10-23-2003, 04:55 PM   #15
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Another source from Goodyear:

Oil, Solvents and Grease
Mounted or unmounted tires
should never be stored on oily floors
or otherwise in contact with solvents,
oil or grease. Nor should tires be stored
in the same or adjoining rooms with
volatile solvents. These solids, liquids or
vapors are readily absorbed in rubber
and will damage and weaken it .
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Old 10-23-2003, 05:09 PM   #16
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I have an issue with the above quote on transmission oil evaporating.

I do not believe oil evaporates!

Water evaporates. Silicone coiuld. Brake fluid might.

Engine oil, automatic transmission oil, and rear axle grease could not evaporate unless we are talking about burning or combustion. The oil in thoses liquids does not evaporate.

And my opinion on applying an oil to a tire is that it does act as a solvent. (Cleaner) For a short term application, (such as cleaning) I would think solvents would have only a small effect. And I am open to being wrong on that opinion. Look at carb cleaner or brake cleaner. Those chemicals are stuffed with petroleum distillates and solvents. I do not use them on tires nor on any rubber vinyl items.

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Old 10-23-2003, 05:15 PM   #17
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Gesso

That products website recommends it for ridged not flexible canvas. Not sure it would be much good for flexible tires.

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Old 10-23-2003, 05:21 PM   #18
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The biggest point that may need to be realized is that oils and petroleum by products when applied - tend to heat. Tires generate heat in form of friction of road contact - plus that absorbed from heat generated from ball bearings etc.. Natural property of such petroleum products is to react to it. This to causes undo degeneration of the tires underneath the application since the tire itself as well has these properties. So while such applications in a storage enviroment may be the lesser of two evils - I would think it may be wise not to practice this method when actually towing on a steady basis or over long hauls. The best surefire way to prevent tire rot - is when you intend on storing the unit for long periods of time - remove the tires and place them in a cool - dark - dry location - or make it part of the schedule that you bring the trailer out for a jaunt around the block or two every month or two... also make sure you check tire pressures prior to storage and inflate / deflate to proper temps that the weather conditions dictate - which will substainally improve the life of the tire as well. I know I am guilty of the same procedure which is why I ended up having to replace tires on my Mustang that had less than 15K on them. (left it outside and low profile tires do not really like storage for long periods in 15 degree weather with PSI set at 90 degree temps settings....
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Old 10-23-2003, 05:30 PM   #19
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And yet another source from Car Care Specialties:

"My personal favorite tire and exterior rubber/vinyl trim protectant is Black Again. It is, in my opinion, the best non-silicone oil based product to restore the jet-black patina to tires and exterior rubber/vinyl. A white creamy polymer emulsion, with a heavy duty UV protectant, it works equally well on all colors of exterior trim. An excellent spray on type of protectant for tires and rubber trim is One Grand Exterior Rubber Treatment. Spray on, allow to penetrate and buff off the excess, leaving a medium gloss, non-greasy finish. Harly Tire Nu is another spay on product with a high gloss finish. Meguiar #40 is a vinyl and rubber cleaner and conditioner. I feel it works better on vinyl than it does on rubber. Leaves a medium gloss finish. Sonax Trim Protectant cleans and protects exterior vinyl and rubber, producing a high gloss finish. Zymol Tyre is a new product that leaves a medium gloss and helps restore some of the black patina to rubber. Wurth Rubber Care, Sonax Rubber Care and Zymol Seal are designed for the "live" rubber door gaskets. These products are rich in glycerin and help maintain the flexibility and sealing ability of the gaskets. A nice side benefit is that they help keep doors from freezing in winter.
© 1999 Car Care Specialties, Inc."
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Old 10-23-2003, 05:37 PM   #20
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This is an advertisement

but contains some good info from their website.....

"303 Aerospace Protectant on Antique (Classic Car) tires !
You’ve seen them around, those spiffy, brand-new looking Classic Cars that catch everyone’s eye.
As you might guess, these collector cars don’t get driven much, often only on perfect sunny days, to club gatherings or car shows.
Because they’re seldom driven, classic car tires only rarely are warn out. Instead they share the problem shared by RVers & trailer boaters….the tire side walls dry, check and eventually crack. With miles of healthy treat remaining, the side walls fail.
Tire manufacturers use specialized waxes to forestall this problem. When tires are in use, they flex. This flexing causes the waxes to migrate to the surface where they form a physical barrier to keep air (ozone and other oxidizing gases) away from the tire polymer. This process, waxes moving to the surface because of flexing, is called ‘Blooming’.
When tires are not used regularly (a stored classic car, tractor or motorcycle), blooming does not occur.
Unfortunately, many “protectants” and “tire dressings” use petrochemicals and silicone oil formulations which remove the protective waxes thus increasing the rate of degradation. Tire manufacturers are well aware that these products do this. When evidence of the use of these products is found during a side wall failure warranty situation, this alone is often cause for not warranting the tire.
303 Aerospace Protectant does NOT contain petrochemicals or silicone oils and does not remove the protective wax layer. Instead it forms a durable barrier ozone has to eat through before it can get to the wax, before it can get to the tire. 303 also delivers a set of powerful UV stabilizers into the rubber to protect against UV degradation…the second environmental factor related to side wall failure.
303 Aerospace Protectant protects against ozone & UV and, used regularly, protects tires against the drying and checking that leads to side wall failure. (A large N. California public utility found only 303 protected the tires of utility vehicles used around geothermal plants, while untreated tires commonly last only a year due to the emission of subterranean gasses in those areas). And if that wasn’t enough, 303 Aerospace Protectant imparts the lustrous, rich, dark black look and feel of brand new rubber. Here’s how:
Spray 303 Aerospace Protectant on a clean and dry tire until the side wall is thoroughly wet with 303. Without touching the rubber, use a soft, absorbent cloth to wipe away any 303 over spray from the rim. Do each tire the same way.
The first treatment takes a little more product. After 10 minutes or so, on any part of the tire where 303 has completely absorbed in and dried, mist on a little more 303. When you see the tires won’t absorb any more 303, wipe each tire completely dry to pick up any excess 303."
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Old 10-23-2003, 08:46 PM   #21
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My 2 cents... The best method of tire longivity is to park on wood planks and cover when not on a trip. If possiable pull the trailer at least once a month far enough to get the tires up to normal temp.
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Old 10-23-2003, 09:10 PM   #22
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my 20000 volts worth...

do not allow oil to come in contact with rubber!

my life depends on the daily care and use of rubber. at my job, I'm a lineman for those of you who don't know.

i regularly do live hand work on circuits energized above 12,000 volts.

i use rubber gloves that are less than one sixteenth of an inch thick to keep me from becoming part of the circuit. and rubber sleeves that cover all of my arms also.

caring for it is life and death for me!

pounded into our skulls from day one, is to never let oil contact rubber for any amount of time.

it swells, becomes soft, and disintergrates almost instantly!

go ahead and wipe it on your tires if you want, i won't!

my gloves/sleeves get oiled from occasional hydralic leaks on my bucket truck. they go to the rubber goods lab for a retest and or disposal!

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Old 10-23-2003, 10:49 PM   #23
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Ozone?

Backing up to the RVDoctor -- he includes ozone as someting to avoid. I have always heard that it causes rubber to get punky (gloves, tubing, waders, etc).

I know that brushes on motor armatures generate small amounts of ozone and have tried to avoid storing rubber products in rooms where motors frequently run. Has anybody heard such an advisory applied to tires?
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Old 10-24-2003, 05:21 AM   #24
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Re: Ozone?

Quote:
Originally posted by Canoe'stream
Backing up to the RVDoctor -- he includes ozone as someting to avoid. I have always heard that it causes rubber to get punky (gloves, tubing, waders, etc).

I know that brushes on motor armatures generate small amounts of ozone and have tried to avoid storing rubber products in rooms where motors frequently run. Has anybody heard such an advisory applied to tires?
haven't directly heard that about tires bob.

however, i do know the tires on trucks at our power plants do not last very long due to ozone.

back to the rubber gloves, ozone creates small cracks in rubber.

it almost looks like someone had cut it with a knife. again, way bad.

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Old 10-24-2003, 07:02 AM   #25
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I have been using Turtle Wax Tire Wax ( with UV protectant) on my tires isnce it came to the market last year. I use it every 3-4 months, easy to apply and the sidewalls retain a shine, and flexible appearance quite awhile even in the hot southern sun.
I have tried other products, but this seems to hold up the best.
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Old 10-24-2003, 08:39 AM   #26
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Seemed like a good idea at first, but there's no oil in the future for my tractor tires or A/S tires.
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Old 11-17-2003, 10:21 PM   #27
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As a Rubber Chemist in my other life, I can report that mineral oil is a part of an automobile tire rubber formulation. Its function is to act as a plasticizer. and it does migrate to the surface over time and temperature.
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